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World Food Day - Amina J. Mohammed Video Message (16 October 2017)
Description: Video message by H.E. Ms. Amina J. Mohammed, Deputy Secretary-General, on World Food Day New York, 16 October 2017.
  16 Oct 2017   2m20s 18 371 0
The impact of glacier retreat in the  Andes
Description: Overview of the challenges of the impact of glacier retreat in the Andes, and the activities of the International Hydrological Programme of UNESCO through an international multidisciplinary network to identify vulnerabilities, policy needs as well as adaptation strategies.
  10 Oct 2017   3m43s 5 188 0
The Landseekers - Working to Solve Climate Displacement
Description: Our work around the world with climate displaced communities has shown DS time and time again that land lies at the core of rights-based solutions to climate displacement. This short film contains interviews of some of the world’s first ‘landseekers’ who work tirelessly in support of climate displaced communities everywhere.
  09 Oct 2017   5m18s 3 68 0
Hurricanes Irma and Maria & other topics - Daily Briefing (9 October 2017)
Description: Daily Press Briefing: Antigua & Barbuda Dominica, Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Humanitarian Aid, Iraq, Ukraine, Kyrgyzstan, Mali, Agriculture, Food Security, Press Conference Today Briefing by Stéphane Dujarric, Spokesperson for the Secretary-General HIGHLIGHTS ----------------------- -IN ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA, DOMINICA, SECRETARY-GENERAL APPEALS FOR INTERNATIONAL SOLIDARITY IN WAKE OF HURRICANES -NUMBER OF ROHINGYA REFUGEES IN BANGLADESH REACHES 519,000 – U.N. RELIEF WING - TWO PEACEKEEPERS KILLED IN ATTACK AGAINST U.N. BASE IN D.R. CONGO’S NORTH KIVU - U.N. EMERGENCY RESPONSE FUND REACHES ANNUAL FUNDING GOAL OF $450 MILLION, MORE NEEDED FOR 2018 - FIGHTING ENDING IN IRAQ’S HAWIJA BUT U.N. CONCERNED OVER SAFETY OF CIVILIANS - U.N. SENIOR RELIEF OFFICIAL TO VISIT UKRAINE - U.N. AGENCY AND KYRGYZSTAN DEVELOP FOOD INSECURITY WARNING SYSTEM - THOUSANDS OF CHILDREN AT RISK IN MALI AMID NUTRITION CRISIS - UNICEF - RURAL AREAS KEY TO ECONOMIC GROWTH IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES – U.N. REPORT - SECRETARY-GENERAL URGES INVESTMENT IN FOOD SECURITY, RURAL DEVELOPMENT TO BUILD RESILIENT COMMUNITIES Full Highlights: https://www.un.org/sg/en/content/noon-briefing-highlight?date%5Bvalue%5D%5Bdate%5D=9%20October%202017
  09 Oct 2017   14m54s 11 293 0
Hurricane Affected Countries -  Media Stakeout with António Guterres (UN Secretary-General)
Description: Informal comments to the media by United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres on the countries affected by the recent hurricanes, as well as on climate change and other matters.
  04 Oct 2017   14m55s 31 1417 0
“Climate change and health: challenges, promising practices and financing in the Americas”
Description: “Climate change and health: challenges, promising practices and financing in the Americas” The speakers during this session were: Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of WHO Dr. Carissa Etienne, Director of PAHO Dr. Isabella Danel, Deputy Director of PAHO Hon. Miguel Mayo, Minister of Health of Panama Mr. Angus Friday, Ambassador of Grenada to the OAS Dr. Theresa Tam, Chief Public Health Officer, Public Health Agency of Canada Dr. Juan Pablo Bonilla, Manager, Climate Change and Sustainable Development of the Inter-American Development Bank
  02 Oct 2017   1h28m29s 3 86 0
Turning on water security
Description: This documentary by Hero Film for CDKN explores why climate change has become an issue for water security and people's overall security in Africa - and how capacity-building efforts by CDKN and the Global Water Partnership are helping decision-makers invest in more climate-resilient infrastructure.
  27 Sep 2017   8m45s 1 47 0
Aid Performance and Climate Change
Description: Monday 25 September 2017, 14.30-16.30 DIIS ∙ Danish Institute for International Studies Auditorium Background The quality of partnerships is key. The richer countries spend about €140 billion yearly on overseas aid, mainly to keep human development going. These efforts are undermined by climate change, water-catchment damage, biodiversity loss, and desertification, and their interactions with social systems at all scales, which few aid designs or evaluations fully address. This must change if aid performance is to be improved. Constraints to overcome include limited understanding of the very complex systems that aid investments affect, and of the ecology behind climate change adaptation and mitigation. This seminar will discuss how to address these problems and others, by looking at the use of multiple points of view (including core evaluation criteria of relevance, efficiency, effectiveness, impact, sustainability, connectedness, coherence, and replicability, and other key considerations of partner satisfaction, cross-cutting themes, and design quality) to describe each aid investment as a complex system in its own unique context. It will also explore the need for understanding the historical, social, and ecological context of any investment as part of due diligence in evaluation or design, issues to do with the quality of partnerships, and the detection of ripening circumstances that allow transformations to be achieved. In his most recent book, Aid Performance and Climate Change, Julian Caldecott compiles lessons into a practical guide to the design and evaluation of investments related to climate change mitigation (REDD+, low-carbon technologies) and adaptation (ecosystems, biodiversity, water). With examples of success and failure throughout, Julian Caldecott reviews cases, ideas, and options for mitigation using technology and ecology for adaptation by preserving resilience and diversity, while exploring related priorities, treaties, and opportunities. His book combines an empirical, eye-witness approach with methodological conclusions, and offers a resource for those looking to improve aid design and evaluation, and to train the next generation of aid professionals in ways that respond to the causes and consequences of climate change. Speakers Julian Caldecott, PhD, Director, Creatura Ltd Mike Speirs, Senior Adviser, Evaluation & Research Department, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark Ole Winckler Andersen, Senior Analyst, DIIS Programme 0:00-4:10 Welcome, Helle Munk Ravnborg 4:13-43:14 Aid Performance and Climate Change, Julian Caldecott 43:57-55:04 Discussant, Mike Speirs 55:24-1:03:05 Discussant, Ole Winckler Andersen 1:03:11-1:49:48 Q&A, Moderator: Helle Munk Ravnborg Read more on diis.dk.
  25 Sep 2017   1h49m53s 1 58 0
Global climate governance in a changing world
Description: Global climate governance in a changing world Are new coalitions reshaping climate negotiations? Thursday 14 September 2017, 15.00-17.00 DIIS ∙ Danish Institute for International Studies Background In November, government representatives will meet in Bonn, Germany to continue negotiations on how to implement the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change. The negotiations take place against the backdrop of the US government’s spring 2017 decision to withdraw from the accord, drawing attention to the role of many other state and non-state actors in sustaining its momentum. In this changing context, this seminar asks: • What old and new coalitions are driving climate negotiations forward? • How is the traditional divide between North and South developing? • What are the key topics on the agenda in the negotiations, and what are Denmark’s particular interests? • Where can Denmark look for climate allies within and beyond the EU? International negotiations, to address the causes and consequences of climate change, have long provided an arena of contention between industrialized countries with a large historical responsibility for greenhouse gas emissions on one side, and developing countries that have contributed less to climate change but are more vulnerable to its negative effects on the other. In recent years, however, the diversity of national experiences, interests, and political initiatives related to climate change has become increasingly clear. New coalitions and actor groupings are contributing to reshaping climate negotiations. This shift presents an opportunity for navigating away from political stalemates, but also creates a more complicated picture of where the key areas for agreement and disagreement among negotiating parties lie. This seminar will explore the changing actor dynamics in climate negotiations in the lead up to the 23rd Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC (COP 23). The seminar will outline emerging constellations of actor interests and discuss the core issues for debate as parties work on finalizing the implementation plan for the Paris Agreement. It will also discuss Denmark’s priorities in this year’s negotiations and the prospects for promoting Danish positions on climate questions. Speakers Lau Øfjord Blaxekjær, Assistant Professor and Programme Director, University of the Faroe Islands Anette Ejersted, Chief Negotiator, International Office, Danish Ministry of Energy, Utilities, and Climate Mikkel Funder, Senior Researcher, DIIS Erik Lundsgaarde, Senior Researcher, DIIS Programme 0:00-8:52 Welcome and introduction, Erik Lundsgaarde 9:09-45:31 New narratives and practices of global climate governance, Lau Øfjord Blaxekjær 47:49-1:04:00 Danish priorities and outlook toward COP 23, Anette Ejersted 1:06:04-1:15:25 Reflections from discussant, Mikkel Funder 1:15:37-1:45:39 Audience questions and open discussion, moderator: Mikkel Funder Read more at www.diis.dk
  14 Sep 2017   1h45m41s 2 113 0
Meeting the global demand for food assistance - panel
Description: This event, drawing on the World Food Programme's (WFP) 2017 global stocktake of food assistance, brings together voices from across academic, NGO and donor communities.
  05 Sep 2017   51m24s 1 112 0
How to ensure Food Security in times of Climate Change
Description: In this video, experts discuss the role climate change plays as a conflict multiplier. Key aspects include shocks in food production and the disintegration of livelihood systems, putting increased pressure on local populations that are dependent on agricultural activities. Land restoration, climate change mitigation and early warning systems can be supported by effective global governance for curtailing climate-related risks to peace. The Climate Diplomacy initiative is a collaborative effort of the German Federal Foreign Office in partnership with adelphi. http://www.climate-diplomacy.org Subscribe to the newsletter here: http://bit.ly/subscribeECC Follow Climate Diplomacy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ClimateDiplo "Numerous experts fear that climate change exists as a risk factor for peace. One key impact is that climate change is likely to disrupt food production in many regions. This will have serious consequences for local livelihoods - particularly those dependent on farming, fishing and herding. Others will also be affected, as the risk of public unrest and civil conflict intensifies when food prices and availability become more volatile. Oli Brown (http://bit.ly/UNEProle): Climate change plays out in many different ways around food security and water and land and so on. Fundamentally, it’s redrawing the maps of our world and that is very destabilizing, it potentially makes life a lot more difficult in different parts of the world through food security problems, through internal displacement, through problems of water. Sue Lautze (http://bit.ly/FAOclim): There can be no food security without peace, there also cannot be any peace without food security! John Liu (http://bit.ly/trueWealth): Well, it is pretty complex because you have geologic, evolutionary, and human history and so we have millions of years of data and thousands of years of data and it says human beings have damaged natural ecosystem function on a planetary scale. And it seems to me that climate change is more of a symptom than an actual end result and we have also seen that it is possible to rehabilitate large scale damaged ecosystems. This knowledge is a responsibility. This is the way to end poverty. This is the way to have sufficient water resources, to have food security and this is the way to address climate change. As demographic change puts additional pressure on agricultural systems, it’s more important than ever to safeguard the biosphere’s ability to produce enough food to fulfill humanity’s needs. It is crucial, therefore, to ensure that vulnerable communities are able to adapt to negative impacts. Kitty van der Heijden (http://bit.ly/NileWater): Take one example in my own backyard, I live in Ethiopia, as I said, in the province of the north of Tigray. You know, heavily stricken by El Niño, climate impacts, huge food insecurity – so what do you do? Years ago, we started with many other partners to talk about restoring degraded lands. You can do that with very simple means: Giving the farmers ownership over the trees. By now farmers themselves, with their own hands, moved 90 million tons of soil, of dirt and of stones to help with water harvesting, for terassing of the hilly terrain. If you look at that region now, it is the one region that is still food secure, that despite the drought, despite El Niño. It did not cost a heck of a lot of money. Land restoration is but one example of many actions which can be taken to ensure food security and prevent conflict. Other examples include climate change mitigation, improving access to food or refining early warning/early action systems. Global governance can support these efforts, for example by coordinating the responses, reforming trade regimes, and establishing equitable insurance schemes. To learn more about climate change, food security and conflict, and to find recommendations, have a look at the interactive ECC Factbook: • Global Food Price Shocks. ECC Factbook: http://bit.ly/FoodPriceShock • Food price volatility and fragility in the MENA region. Climate Diplomacy: http://bit.ly/MENAfoodprice • Supporting Global Food Security in a Changing Climate Through Transatlantic Cooperation By Michael Werz and Benjamin Pohl: http://bit.ly/TransCoopFS" This interview was conducted at the Planetary Security Conference in The Hague, 5-6 December 2016. It is produced by Paul Müller-Hahl (Lichtbilder Filmproduktion) and directed by Stella Schaller (adelphi).
  04 Sep 2017   4m2s 10 611 0
Tuvalu Coastal Adaptation Project: Defending Tuvalu's coasts from the impacts of climate change
Description: Officially launched by the Prime Minister of Tuvalu on August 30 2017 in the capital of Funafuti, the Tuvalu Coastal Adaptation Project, implemented by UNDP, is set to shore up Tuvalu's coastal defenses in the face of rising sea levels and storm surges driven by climate change. The Tuvalu Coastal Adaptation Project, set to run for seven years, is financed with US$36 million from the Green Climate Fund and $2.9 million from the Government of Tuvalu. “Some time ago a little girl on the island of Nanumea asked me: ‘Prime Minister what can you do to save me? How can you ensure I can continue living on my island?’ That question struck at the bottom of my heart. It has become my mission and must be the mission that every Tuvaluan to paddle together to.” said Prime Minister Enele Sopoaga, at the launch event. “This project is the pride of Tuvalu. Its implementation is based on strong partnership with island leaders and communities, and with our partner UNDP we will paddle together to build resilience...” Learn more: http://www.adaptation-undp.org/projects/tuvalu-coastal-adaptation-project Follow the project on Twitter #TCAPGCF
  30 Aug 2017   2m5s 2 124 0