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16 Aug 2016 description
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EMILY BAUMGAERTNER

KINSHASA, Democratic Republic of the Congo—In the doorway of a one-room yellow fever ward in downtown Kinshasa, a toddler named Julia is slung over her mother’s shoulder. Moments later a nurse directs mother and child to the last vacant bed and inserts an intravenous line into the girl’s wrist. Her lemon-yellow eyes staring vacantly ahead, Julia does not flinch as the needle punctures her skin. She could be awaiting a hand massage or a manicure.

22 Jun 2016 description
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EMILY BAUMGAERTNER

In January 2016, I spent four hours on a Wednesday afternoon wondering if maybe I had Ebola. I was a week into a reporting trip in Freetown, Sierra Leone, and that morning, I had woken up with a pounding headache, aching joints, and chills in 96-degree mugginess. That week, I had walked through several Ebola treatment units, two with suspected active cases, and touched dozens of potential carriers. Yet in spite of my trip’s mission to uncover how dormant Ebola is still seeking fresh, vulnerable hosts—like me—I didn’t think much of the symptoms. Jet lag?

21 Apr 2016 description
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LESLIE ROBERTS

PAILIN, Cambodia—No one knows exactly why resistance to malaria drugs always emerges first in this remote western province of Cambodia, nestled in the Cardamom Mountains. “The reasons are as much social as biological,” says malariologist Tom Peto, who is here in this dusty, unremarkable-looking town battling the latest threat to global malaria control: multiple drug–resistant (MDR) malaria.

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21 Dec 2015 description
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JAE LEE

Francis Kyakulaga, a district sanitation manager, and I had finished eating a meal at the ground floor restaurant of the Mwaana Hotel on the Trans-African Highway in Uganda. During the meal, we noticed an increasing commotion in the hotel lobby area, and Kyakulaga asked a man what was happening. He informed us that someone had collapsed upstairs.

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04 Jun 2015 description
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MATT HONGOLTZ-HETLING AND MICHAEL G. SEAMANS

KONO, Sierra Leone — A recent two-week visit to Kono, a remote and rural district in Sierra Leone, showed that trust is at the heart of a nonprofit’s effort to combat not only the spread of Ebola but the world’s worst infant mortality rate.

There, a small nonprofit called the Wellbody Alliance is grappling with the loss of trust caused by the Ebola epidemic, and working to rebuild that trust with a bold new program.

30 Apr 2015 description
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Joshua Bukenya was barely a week old when he started having convulsions in March, 2014. His worried parents took him to be prayed over at a church near their home in eastern Uganda's Buyende district. At first, it seemed to work, said his mother, Mera. But, with time, it became clear that the child's head was growing abnormally large. In November, his mother brought him to the CURE Children's Hospital in the city of Mbale for treatment.

28 Apr 2015 description
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DORMA, Sierra Leone — Inside his mud-walled house, the witch doctor cast his curse. Here, in the remote Dorma Village of Sierra Leone, where some of the poorest people in the world spend most of their day struggling to feed their families, the witch doctor’s power over life and death was well known.

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06 Feb 2015 description
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AMY MAXMEN

FREETOWN, Sierra Leone—A great quarrel followed the death of a pregnant Guinean woman in June. Mourners refused to allow a team of outsiders dressed in what looked like white space suits to bury her Ebola-infected corpse. If she was to be saved from eternal wandering and reach the village of the dead, they insisted, her fetus must be removed.

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28 Jan 2015 description
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FREETOWN, Sierra Leone—A sea of rusted, tin-roofed shanties cascades chaotically to the Atlantic. Between the makeshift shelters of Kroo Bay, a slum in the capital of Sierra Leone, people wash, cook, urinate, and repair roofs, radios, and engines.

06 Jan 2015 description
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AMY MAXMEN

Haja Umu Jalloh has not left the room and cordoned-off porch for three weeks. She eats bowls of rice and sauce, slid underneath a nylon rope she cannot cross. She has lost her family — her parents, her aunt and uncle, her 1-year-old son. But the 17-year-old says defiantly, "I feel happy because I am protecting others."

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05 Jan 2015 description
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AMY MAXMEN

Sogbandi Botton was hired by the government to track down people who show symptoms of Ebola and deliver them to medical care. But Botton, a medical student, says that most of the health complaints he has heard lately can be traced to the side effects of a malaria drug. “People are vomiting and tired,” he says. “Two of them couldn’t even stand up.”

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24 Dec 2014 description
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ERIKA CHECK HAYDEN

Alex Moigboi was panicking. He was preparing to enter the Ebola ward wearing just a pair of gloves and a plastic gown over his scrubs. It was totally inadequate—like a firefighter entering a burning building wearing a pair of Ray-Bans—and Alex knew it. But he couldn’t find the rest of the protective gear he needed: goggles, a Tyvek waterproof suit.

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06 Oct 2014 description
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SONIA SHAH

30 Jun 2014 description
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ROGER THUROW

GUATEMALA CITY — In a hip restaurant set within a high-fashion clothing store, baristas created “Super Nutritious” drinks like the Sangre de Vampiro, a mixture of pineapple, celery, beets, lemon, orange juice and organic honey. “Rich in antioxidants,” boasts the menu.

Elsewhere in the restaurant, the subject of malnutrition was on the table. “Guatemala is fourth place in the world in chronically malnourished children,” Alejandro Biguria, a young architect in this capital city, was saying. “It’s outrageous.”

18 Jun 2014 description
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Screenshot of the interactive content as of 18 Jun 2014.

ZACH CHILD AND DAN MCCAREY

It’s the nature of journalism to focus on what’s wrong and in a world that’s full of violence and suffering there’s no shortage of subjects. A new Pulitzer Center interactive map spotlights instead a remarkable success, and one that has gone under-reported — the extraordinary decline in the rate of child mortality.

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12 Feb 2014 description
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Published February 11, 2014

Kem Knapp Sawyer

Dr. Kasereka “Jo” Lusi, an orthopedic surgeon who performs much needed operations in the war-torn region of Goma, the largest city in eastern Congo, is also a forceful advocate for women’s rights.

“If you assist women and children you have begun to deal with the health of a nation,” he said. In a country where “raping a woman is like nothing,” he added, “we must show women their rights and teach the men.”

10 Feb 2014 description
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CONGO, AFRICA—"It used to be just a form of recreation for us,” Chiku Lwambo says, “but now with contemporary dance we have found a way to express ourselves and take a stand."

Chiku was taking a rehearsal break at Yolé!Africa, an arts center in Goma, the largest city in eastern Congo. Chiku, 26, and his twin Chito are co-directors of Busara, a dance company they formed in 2009.

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02 Dec 2013 description
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An abandoned measure in malaria prevention has been resurrected in six African nations this year. About 1.2 million healthy children are swallowing malaria drugs to prevent the disease during the rainy season in regions where malaria mainly strikes within those months.

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