Updates

Your gateway to all content to date. Search and/or drill down with filters to narrow down the content.

42 entries found
Sort by: Latest |Relevance
12 Dec 2011 description

Introduction

The Iraq Knowledge Network (IKN) survey is part of a Socio-Economic Monitoring System being developed by the Iraqi Ministry of Planning to advance evidence based planning and improve services provided to Iraqi citizens. The IKN survey data was collected in the first quarter of 2011 from 28,875 Iraqi households. The sample was designed to provide statistics at the district and governorate levels and nationally by urban and rural areas. This factsheet is a brief analysis of essential services data from the IKN.

30 May 2011 description

IAU May 2011 newsletter highlights the IAU new products including factsheets on violence against women, water resource management and landmines and UXOs and the Iraq information portal.

30 Nov 2010 description

Overview

Situated in central Iraq just south of Baghdad, Babil is part of the so-called "Cradle of Civilisation". The governorate is located on the site of the ancient Babylonian civilization, which dates back to the beginning of the second millennium BC. King Nebuchadnezzar II built the famous Hanging Gardens of Babylon around 600 BC, but the gardens were destroyed by successive earthquakes around 400 years later.

30 Nov 2010 description

Overview

Kerbala is located between Anbar, Babil and Najaf in southern central Iraq. It is one of the country's smallest and least populated governorates.

30 Nov 2010 description

Overview

Covering almost all of western Iraq, Anbar is Iraq's largest governorate, but also the most sparsely populated. Desert dominates the landscape, particularly in al-Rutba district. The governorate borders Saudi Arabia, Syria and Jordan.

Between 2003 and 2005, the city of Falluja was the scene of continued confrontations between the Multi National Forces in Iraq (MNF-I) and armed groups in which many civilians were killed. MNF-I forces gained control of the city during Operation "Phantom Fury", launched in November 2004.

30 Nov 2010 description

Overview

Situated on the border with Turkey, Dahuk, is Iraq's most northern governorate. Along with Erbil and Sulaymaniyah, Dahuk makes up the area administrated by the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG). Much of Dahuk's landscape is dominated by mountains. There are some outstanding issues between Ninewa and Dahuk regarding the administrative status of Al-Shikhan, Telafar, Tilkaif, Akre and Sinjar districts.

30 Nov 2010 description

Overview

Located in the north of Iraq, Erbil borders Turkey to the north and Iran to the east. Erbil combines with Dahuk and Sulaymaniyah to form the area administrated by the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG). The city of Erbil is the capital of both Erbil governorate and the KRG. The administrative status of Makhmur district, which borders on Ninewa, has yet to be officially determined. The security situation remains generally calm.

30 Nov 2010 description

Overview

Situated in the south eastern corner of Iraq, Basrah is the socioeconomic hub of southern Iraq. The governorate capital of the same name is Iraq's third largest city. The governorate's geography is diverse, ranging from the Marshland areas in the north to plains and desert further south.

Basrah contains a significant proportion of Iraq's oil reserves, and the Umm Qasr port is the country's only shipping hub. The provincial government's economic development priorities therefore focus on oil and transport, with agriculture playing a small role.

30 Nov 2010 description

Overview

Located in northern Iraq, Kirkuk (formerly known as Tameem) produces a significant proportion of Iraq's oil exports. Saddam Hussein pursued a policy of "Arabization" in the governorate, expelling much of its Kurdish and Turkmen populations and replacing them with Arabs (mostly Shi'a) from the south. After 2003, many of those displaced returned to reclaim their homes and property.

Kirkuk's administrative status is under dispute between the Iraqi central government and the semi-autonomous Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG).

30 Nov 2010 description

Overview

Located on Iraq's southern border with Saudi Arabia, Muthanna is Iraq's second largest governorate, but also the second least populated. The landscape is dominated by desert, with natural water sources confined to the northern areas around the Euphrates River. The capital, Samawah, lies near the site of the ancient city of Uruk, which dates back to the 4th millennium BC.

30 Nov 2010 description

Overview

Located on Iraq's eastern border with Iran, Diyala borders Baghdad to the south east. The population is the most rural in Iraq. The landscape varies dramatically from the Himreen mountains in the north to the desert in the south. Diyala has a diverse ethnic composition of Kurds, Turkmen and Arabs.

30 Nov 2010 description

Overview

Tracing its origins back to the end of the 7th century AD, Wassit is situated on Iraq's eastern border with Iran. The governorate is an important trade route for goods being transported to Iran, north to Baghdad or south to Missan along the Tigris River. Clashes between local militias and government forces persisted in the latter half of 2008, but the situation became calmer during 2009.

Wassit has potential for growth and diversity in its agricultural and industrial output.

30 Nov 2010 description

Overview

Qadissiya is located in southern central Iraq on Muthanna's northern border. The Shamiya River (a major branch of the Euphrates) runs through Hamza district in the south western corner of the governorate. The ruined city of Nipur, once the religious capital of the Sumerian civilization of the 4th millennium BC, is the most famous of the governorate's numerous ancient sites. The Battle of Qadissiya in the 16th year of the Hijra (636 AD) witnessed a major victory for Caliph Omar over the Persian Sassanids, bringing Islam to the area now covered by Iraq and Iran.

30 Nov 2010 description

Overview

Located in the north east of Iraq on the border with Iran, Sulaymaniyah combines with Erbil and Dahuk governorates to form the area administrated by the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG). Sulaymaniyah contains the third largest share of the population, which is one of the most urbanized in Iraq. The landscape becomes increasingly mountainous towards the eastern border with Iran.

Unemployment is relatively low in the governorate at 12%.

30 Nov 2010 description

Overview

Baghdad is home to the largest share of Iraq's population, the vast majority of which live in the capital city of the same name.

30 Nov 2010 description

Overview

Located in northern Iraq and bordering with Syria, Ninewa is Iraq's third largest and second most populated governorate. The capital, Mosul, is Iraq's third largest city. The province is home to the Mosque of the Prophet Yunus (known as Jonah in the Bible), the Grand Mosque dating back to 568 AD, and the ancient Martuma church.

30 Nov 2010 description

Overview

Najaf is located between Anbar and Muthanna governorates on Iraq's southern border with Saudi Arabia. Its landscape is dominated by desert, particularly towards the border with Saudi Arabia. Najaf city hosts the shrine of Ali Ibn Abi Talib, who is regarded by Shi'a Muslims the first Imam and by Sunni Muslims the fourth Caliph. The city is therefore one of the most holy sites in Shi'a Islam, attracting high numbers of religious tourists from within Iraq and abroad, and a centre for religious scholarship.

30 Nov 2010 description

Overview

Situated in the south east of Iraq, north west of Basrah, Thi-Qar is the site of the ancient Sumerian cities of Ur, Eridu, Ngirsu and Lagash. The security situation in the governorate remains calm.

The draining of the Marshland areas in the south west of the governorate during the 1980s had a severe impact on the governorate's agriculture-based economy. Unemployment is high at 31% compared to a 15% national average.

30 Nov 2010 description

Overview

Missan is located near Iraq's south eastern corner, bordering Basrah to the south and Iran to the east and north. Missan's historical roots can be traced from 324 BC, when King Alexander III of Macedon (Alexander the Great) built the city of Cherkhina at the meeting point of the Degla and Al-Karoun rivers. Over 40% of the population lives in the Marshlands, which cover Qala'at Saleh, Al-Mejar Al-Kabir, Al-Maimouna and Al-Kahla districts.