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13 Feb 2018 description

Opened in July 2016, Pagirinya settlement hosts more than 32,000 refugees displaced from South Sudan. The humanitarian response across all sectors has now stabilized and is beginning to shift beyond emergency operations. The settlement’s organized, physical design facilitates access to important facilities, including health centers and schools. However, services in many sectors, such as health and nutrition and water, health and sanitation, must be improved to meet the needs of the population.

Gaps & Challenges

13 Feb 2018 description

Originally closed in 2006 after many South Sudanese refugees returned home, Olua I/II was reopened in 2012 to host another influx of South Sudanese refugees fleeing inter-communal violence. Settlement residents, similarly to other refugees in Adjumani district, live in close proximity to Ugandan nationals and share services and institutions with the host community. Although there is relatively peaceful coexistence between communities, refugees face challenging conditions and need more extensive assistance relating to livelihoods opportunities and education in particular.

13 Feb 2018 description

After opening in January 2014, Nyumanzi has become the largest refugee settlement in Adjumani district in terms of population size. Despite their relatively recent arrival, residents are already well-established and a strong community has emerged in which refugee households actively collaborate with each other to share resources. Although many refugees are resilient, gaps in critical sectors, such as education and water, health and santitation, persist and undermine refugees’ ability to cope with their displacement.

Gaps & Challenges

13 Feb 2018 description

Baratuku, initially established in 1991, has hosted successive waves of South Sudanese refugees since the Second Sudanese War. The settlement’s current population is comprised of some South Sudanese refugees from the 1990s, who were not able to return home, and recent arrivals who have fled the country since 2013. Humanitarian organizations have begun to shift from emergency response to stabilization.

13 Feb 2018 description

Mungula I/II has consistently hosted South Sudanese refugees since it was first established in 1996. As a result, there are close linkages between settlement residents and the neighbouring host community. While implementing and operational partners initially provided critical support during the South Sudanese refugee emergency, a strategy for empowering local organizations to carry on activities in the medium and long-term response is essential.

16 Jan 2018 description

Key Figures

1,395,146 total refugees and asylum-seekers

  • 1,336,898 bio-metrically registered

  • 58,248 pending bio-metric registration

04 Jan 2018 description

Oruchinga settlement, opened as a transit center in 1959 and was officially established as a settlement in 1961, hosts more than 6,900 refugees from Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Rwanda. The settlement is not receiving new arrivals, aside from family reunifications, referrals, and protection cases. Although shelter and infrastructure are developed, and the refugees seem to be well integrated with the host community, protection concerns and conflict over land and resources remain a challenge.

Gaps & Challenges

29 Dec 2017 description

Palorinya settlement, established in December 2016, hosts more than 180,000 South Sudanese refugees across 37.58 square kilometers of land. While infrastructure and funding challenges are significant barriers to a more comprehensive response, partners continue to provide essential services and assistance within the settlement.

Gaps & Challenges

04 Dec 2017 description

Originally established in 1997 to receive refugees fleeing the Second Sudanese Civil War, Maaji settlement II and III were re-opened in 2015 to host new refugee arrivals from South Sudan. While the settlement is no longer receiving new arrivals, humanitarian partners continue to support efforts to improve standards and services for refugees and host community alike.

Gaps and Challenges

  • Insufficient permanent health facilities and lack of an outreach unit leave facilities crowded and health services overstretched.

27 Nov 2017 description

Key Figures

1,400,218 total refugees and asylum-seekers

  • 1,301,018 bio-metrically registered

  • 99,200 pending bio-metric registration

30 Oct 2017 description

1,381,207 Total refugees and asylum-seekers in country (as of 30 September 2017)

1,034,106 Total S.Sudan refugees and asylum-seekers in country (as of 30 September 2017)

347,389 S.Sudan new arrival in country (1 Jan - 18 Sept 2017)

61% Of population are children under 18

82% of the Population are women and children <18

3% Of the population are eldery

51% Of all South Sudan refugees are in Uganda

14 Sep 2017 description

Key Figures

1,355,764 total refugees and asylum-seekers

  • 1,235,765 bio-metrically registered
  • 119,999 pending bio-metric registration
20 Aug 2017 description

South Sudan, Burundi and DRC Refugee Response Plans

Key Figures
REFUGEES IN NEED (by end 2017) 1,497,126
EXPECTED new INFLUX in 2017
520,000

Requirements

960.17 MILLION
TOTAL

673.19 MILLION
SOUTH SUDAN RRP

215.33 MILLION
DRC RRP

71.64 MILLION
BURUNDI RRP

SOUTH SUDAN – UGANDA REFUGEE RESPONSE PLAN

23 Jun 2017 description

Key Figures

  • Refugee Population Planning Figure (by End 2017) 1,497,126

  • Expected New Influx in 2017 520,000

Requirements (in USD)

  • 960.17 Million Total

  • 673.19 Million South Sudan RRP

  • 215.33 Million DRC RRP

  • 71.64 Million Burundi RRP