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24 Feb 2015 description

ABSTRACT: Over 800 million people in 70 countries are classified as “food insecure.” Much humanitarian emphasis focuses on the negative physical consequences of food insecurity, neglecting its deleterious psychological effects. Negative perceptions of food security often coincide with acute mental distress, a complicating factor that intervention policies frequently overlook. This paper posits that understanding the relationships among food security, mental health, and physical health is critical to the formation of effective aid policies.

20 Feb 2015 description

ABSTRACT: With the end of the Cold War, both the concept and practice of humanitarian action have significantly changed. The emergence of the so-called ‘complex humanitarian crises’ made it clear that traditional humanitarian responses based on the classical principles of impartiality and neutrality were not sufficient nor the most appropriate to respond to such complex challenges.

21 Jan 2014 description

In 2013, a climate of insecurity persists in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), despite the presence of the United Nations’ (UN) largest peacekeeping mission, MONUSCO.[i] DRC’s recent past saw armed groups mushrooming and successively challenging the Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (FARDC). In vast, contested areas, territory repeatedly changes hands and the region remains marked by recurring changes in alliances between armed groups as well as their continued re-configuration and (re-)emergence.

03 May 2010 description

By Giulio Di Blasi

Introduction

Following the demise of the Washington Consensus, which was insisting on the need of freeing markets in order to achieve sustainable growth, politics and the state have came back at the center of the debates about development.

26 Apr 2010 description

By Huma Haider

Introduction

Forced migration and displacement is a profound injustice. It undermines human dignity and security and eliminates choice about where and how people want to live. An important aspect of redress is thus the right of refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs) to freely choose a solution to their dislocation. This right of free choice is guaranteed under humanitarian and human rights law.

04 Apr 2010 description


By the JHA Editors and Noamschimmel

Published April 4th, 2010

Keywords: asylum, genocide, human rights, justice, refugees, restorative, Rwanda

"If I were not stopped short by poverty, I would travel far from here, to a country where I would go to school all week long, and play soccer on a nice grassy field, and where no one would want to mistrust me and kill me, ever again."

- Cassius Niyonsaba, Genocide survivor, Rwanda. Extract from 'Life Laid Bare' by Jean Hatzfeld.

02 Apr 2010 description

By Ritendra Tamang and Ramjee Parajulee

Introduction

Population displacement resulting from armed conflict is not a new phenomenon. However, human displacement became a global crisis in the 20th century as a result of changes in geopolitical relations between states and an increase in the number of wars around the world.

05 Feb 2010 description

By Alvaro Mellado Dominguez

This article is the product of my personal reflection and research after working in a malnutrition crisis in Ethiopia in 2008. I came back to the university directly from the field to start to analyse my impressions. The first explanation to be considered is that of overpopulation. According to the World Food Program (WFP) and The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) the population growth was 2.77% per year and the estimated population in Ethiopia was 79.24 million in mid-year 2008 (FAO/WFP 2008:10).

05 Feb 2010 description

By Alvaro Mellado Dominguez

This article is the product of my personal reflection and research after working in a malnutrition crisis in Ethiopia in 2008. I came back to the university directly from the field to start to analyse my impressions. The first explanation to be considered is that of overpopulation. According to the World Food Program (WFP) and The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) the population growth was 2.77% per year and the estimated population in Ethiopia was 79.24 million in mid-year 2008 (FAO/WFP 2008:10).