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Understanding how crises affect women and men, girls and boys of different ages and disparities is critical to effective humanitarian preparedness and response. Women, girls, boys and men have distinct needs, priorities, responsibilities, limitations and protection needs. They are exposed to differential risks and vulnerabilities but also play unique and important roles in preparedness and in responding to emergencies, conflicts and building peace within their respective communities. Gender equality in humanitarian action is about better targeting and programming and therefore about effectiveness of humanitarian action reaching all segments of the affected population.

All Updates on Gender

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05 Sep 2017 description

Developed by UN Women in collaboration with the Ministry of Women, Children and Social Welfare (MOWCSW), Government of Nepal, with collective inputs by the UNCT Gender Theme Group Task Team on Inter-Cluster Gender in Humanitarian Action

2017 Flood Data

04 Sep 2017 description


Although the legal frameworks of Nepal largely support gender equality and social inclusion, various social norms and discriminatory practices have a devastating impact on the most vulnerable and marginalized populations when disaster strikes.

10 Aug 2015 description
report Government of Nepal

1. Housing and Human Settlements


The sector of housing and human settlements was affected the most. The total effects (damages and losses) are valued at NPR 350,379 million, with the total damages amounting to NPR 303,631 million and the total losses estimated at NPR 46,748 million.

23 Jun 2015 description
report Government of Nepal

Executive Summary

Background Nepal is the 11th most earthquake-prone country in the world. Ever since the first recorded earthquake of 1255 AD that killed one-third of the population of the Kathmandu Valley and its King, Abhaya Malla, Nepal has experienced a major earthquake every few generations. The last great earthquake (of magnitude 8.4) in 1934 AD resulted in more than 10,000 deaths in the Kathmandu Valley. Most of the infrastructure and major heritage sites had to be rebuilt. There have since been earthquakes causing severe human and physical loss in 1980, 1988 and 2011.