Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe: Tsvangirai against joining Mugabe govt -source

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By Nelson Banya

HARARE, Nov 14 (Reuters) - Zimbabwean opposition MDC leader Morgan Tsvangirai is against joining a unity government with President Robert Mugabe until all issues in power-sharing talks are resolved, a party source said on Friday.

Tsvangirai has accused Mugabe of trying to take control of the most powerful ministries and freeze out his party in violation of the Sept. 15 agreement seen as the best chance to rescue Zimbabwe's wrecked economy.

"His personal position is that we should not participate in the government until all the outstanding issues have been resolved," the source told Reuters. The party is currently holding talks on how to proceed.

The Movement for Democratic Change's (MDC) executive was meeting on Friday to decide on whether to join a government with Mugabe's ZANU-PF under a power-sharing deal that is in danger of crumbling.

Although Tsvangirai flatly rejected a resolution in a summit of regional leaders calling for the two sides to share control of the Home Affairs ministry -- the main sticking point -- the MDC appears to be divided on joining a government.

"Indications are that while there are clear divisions on the matter, those for joining the government appear to be in the minority, but one cannot say with certainty before the meetings end," said one party source.

MDC sources say some members of Tsvangirai's inner circle are leaning on him to join a unity government.

Some MDC officials intend to take the dispute over ministerial allocations and other issues to the African Union, hoping the continental body would put pressure on Mugabe.

Countries in the Southern African Development Community have failed to persuade Zimbabwe's parties, including a breakaway MDC faction, to bury their differences and move on to the daunting task of easing an economic crisis.

(Editing by Michael Georgy)

Reuters - Thomson Reuters Foundation
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