Yemen

WHO Yemen Situation Report, July 2020 - Issue No.7

Format
Situation Report
Source
Posted
Originally published

Attachments

HIGHLIGHTS

• While humanitarian needs are increasing in Yemen, a significant gap in funding has worsened the situation further. The UN warns that humanitarian operations in Yemen are shutting down.

• WHO 2020 response requires USD 234M. As of 31 July, 47.8M has been received in response to COVID19 and outbreaks control and containment.

• However, COVID-19 continues to claim lives in Yemen, the actual figures of cases and deaths are likely to be much higher than being reported by authorities.

• Conflict keeps raging. As of July, there were 43 active frontlines across the country.

• WHO continued its support to targeted hospitals to ensure functionality and continuous provision of trauma care services.

• Amid an ongoing fuel crisis, WHO continues its support to targeted health facilities with fuel provision to ensure functionality and continuous provision of life-saving health care services.

Situation Update

● A new threat of famine: A new Integrated Phase Classification (IPC) analysis released by the World Food Program (WFP), the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) on 22 July, has warned that economic shocks, conflict, floods, locusts and COVID-19 could reverse food security gains in Yemen. The report analyses the situation of 7.9 million people in 133 districts in southern governorates. It forecasts an alarming increase in the number of people facing high levels of acute food insecurity (IPC Phase 3 and IPC Phase 4), from 2 million to 3.2 million in the next six months, even if existing levels of food assistance are maintained. Such a scenario would reverse improvements made since the 2018/2019 IPC analysis, when more than half a million people moved below IPC Phase 3, primarily because of a massive scale-up of humanitarian food assistance.

● Funding Gap aggravates suffering in Yemen: While humanitarian needs are increasing in Yemen, a significant gap in funding has worsened the situation further. Out of US$1.35 billion pledged by donors on 2 June at the High-Level Pledging Event in Riyadh, only US$ 650 million were received by the end of July, which is less than the fifth of the US$ 3.2 billion required for the humanitarian operations in Yemen. Since mid-April, 31 of 41 of critical UN programmes have reduced or closed for lack of funding.

● COVID-19 continues to claim lives in Yemen: Health partners remain concerned that the actual figures are likely to be much higher than the 1,732 confirmed cases and 494 associated deaths reported as of 31 July. Underreporting continues for various reasons including a shortage of testing facilities, difficulties in accessing health care, fear of stigma, the perceived risks of seeking treatment, and a lack of official reporting, particularly in northern governorates.

● Conflict keeps raging. As of July, there were 43 active frontlines across the country. The month of July has marked increasing hostilities in Hajjah and Al Jawf governorates.
Reports indicated that civilians were killed and injured including children and women.

● Torrential rains and flooding hit Yemen in, damaging infrastructure, destroying homes and shelters and causing deaths and injuries. Heavy rains that started in April and continued into July affected thousands of families, many of them already displaced.
The governorates of Al Hudaydah, Sana’a, Taizz, Ibb, Abyan, Lahj and Marib were the most affected.