Yemen

WFP Yemen Situation Report #3, March 2022

Attachments

In Numbers:

17.4 million people food insecure

31,000 people in famine-like conditions

3.5 million people acutely malnourished

11 million people assisted by WFP in March

Highlights:

• WFP data show that inadequate food consumption increased significantly in Yemen in March, reaching the highest level seen since February 2018. Food prices also increased notably, with the cost of the minimum food basket reaching an all-time high in March.

• The fuel crisis worsened in March, severely delaying deliveries of WFP food and nutrition commodities.

• Yemen’s warring parties in late March announced the temporary cessation of hostilities. On 01 April, UN Special Envoy for Yemen, Hans Grundberg announced that the parties had agreed to a two-month truce.

SITUATION UPDATE

Food Security Situation:

• According to the latest WFP Food Security Update, the nationwide prevalence of inadequate food consumption increased significantly in March 2022, reaching the highest levels seen since February 2018: Half of all surveyed Yemeni households (50 percent) reported inadequate food consumption in March, an increase of six percentage points from February, and above the “very high” threshold of 40 percent.

• In areas under the Sana’a-based authorities the percentage of the population reporting inadequate food consumption reached 50 percent in March, (up from 43 percent in February). In areas under the internationally recognized Government of Yemen (IRG), the percentage reached 49 percent (up from 47 percent in February).

• Food prices also increased significantly in March: Food affordability, as measured by the average cost of the minimum food basket, worsened overall, reaching an all-time high in March 2022.

Fuel Situation:

• The ongoing fuel crisis continued to worsen across the country in March, significantly impacting WFP operations. While the fuel shortages are most acute in areas under the Sana’a-based authorities, fuel shortages are also being reported from areas under the IRG.

• Dispatches of WFP commodities are being severely affected by the fuel crisis, as transporters are forced to wait for up to 15 days for the provision of fuel. At the end of March, dispatches for the ongoing second general food assistance (GFA) dispatch cycle (March-April) were only halfway complete, and WFP expects continuing delays in the coming weeks.

Security Situation:

• On 05 March, two international staff members from Médecins sans frontières (MSF) were kidnapped by unknown assailants in Hadramawt governorate, according to media reports. The abductions come less than a month after five UN staff members were kidnapped in Abyan governorate on 11 February.

• On 26 March, an airstrike in Sana’a city struck 30 meters from the UN Common Accommodation Facility, home to most international UN staff in Sana’a. The airstrike caused minor damage to the compound, and no staff were injured.

• Yemen’s warring parties in late March announced the temporary cessation of hostilities. On 01 April, UN Special Envoy for Yemen, Hans Grundberg announced that the parties had agreed to a two-month ceasefire

• As of the end of March, IOM Rapid Displacement Tracking reported 28,700 people displaced due to conflict across Yemen so far in 2022.

Economic Situation:

• The Yemeni riyal (YER) remained relatively stable in March in areas under the IRG. As of the end of the month, the riyal traded at YER 1,220/USD 1.

• Meanwhile, the YER remained stable in areas under the Sana’a-based authorities, averaging YER 600/USD 1.