UNICEF Yemen Humanitarian Situation Report (April 2019) [EN/AR]

Report
from UN Children's Fund
Published on 30 Apr 2019
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Highlights

  • UNICEF in partnership with Ministry of Public Health and Population and WHO supported and launched a nine-day round of Oral Cholera Vaccination (OCV) campaign on 24 April. The campaign was rolled-out in three districts in the Amanat Al Asimah which were not previously targeted. A total of 1,088,818 people over the age of one were vaccinated during this campaign. This is a first dose of OCV which intends to offer immunity against cholera for approximately six months. A second OCV campaign will follow in these three districts within the next six months to boost the immunity up to three years.

  • Acute fuel and gas shortages throughout northern Yemen have led to long queues, with people reportedly waiting in line for days in some areas. Fuel prices on the black market have increased to YER 18,000 for 20 litres as opposed to the official price of YER 7,300. The shortage impacts on the cost of transport and threatens to increase the price of other commodities and services in country.

  • The escalation in violence continues in Hajjah and has triggered mass population movements since February of this year. An estimated 68,000 families have been displaced. Humanitarian actors conducted a multi-cluster mission to Hajjah early April and have commenced Rapid Response assistance. (OCHA Humanitarian Update 22 March – 17 April 2019)

12.3 million # of children in need of humanitarian assistance (estimated)

24.1 million # of people in need (OCHA, 2019 Yemen Humanitarian Needs Overview

1.71 million # of children internally displaced (IDPs)

4.7 million # of children in need of educational assistance

360,000 # of children under 5 suffering Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM)

17.8 million # of people in need of WASH assistance

19.7 million # of people in need of basic health care

UNICEF Appeal 2019
US$ 536 million

Funding Available*
US$ 222 million

Situation Overview & Humanitarian Needs

The number of Acute Watery Diarrhoea/suspected cholera cases has continued to rise since the start of 2019, with 311 out of 333 districts reporting suspected cases this year so far. Since 1 January 2019 to 30 April 2019, there have been 284,905 suspected cases and 568 associated deaths recorded (CFR 0.20 per cent). While children under five represent a quarter of the total suspected cases, the elderly are most seriously affected. Seventy per cent of suspected cases are reported from six governorates: Amanat al Asimah, Al Hudaydah, Sana’a, Amran, Ibb and Dhamar governorates: 147 districts have been identified as a priority for the response. Health and WASH clusters have significantly scaled-up their response; UNICEF is working closely with the relevant Ministries, WHO and other humanitarian partners to ensure an effective response.

Acute fuel and gas shortages throughout northern Yemen have led to long queues, with people reportedly waiting in line for days in some areas. Fuel prices on the black market have increased to YER 18,000 for 20 litres as opposed to the official price of YER 7,300. The shortage impacts on the cost of transport and threatens to increase the price of other commodities and services in country. The shortages have led to daily protests outside the UNDP building in Sana’a, where protestors have been calling on the UN to intervene to allow oil tankers off the coast of Al Hudaydah to dock and discharge their oil supplies. As of 21 April, 11 ships were cleared in the coalition holding area off the coast of Al Hudaydah containing 231,000 litres of fuel.

The Emergency Relief Coordinator and Under-Secretary General Mark Lowcock has urged donors to convert pledges into cash as the Yemen humanitarian response faces a funding crisis in his address to the Security Council on 15 April. He further added that without payments, UN agencies and partners face ‘no option but to close or scale down programmes and at a time when we are struggling to prevent widespread famine and roll back cholera and other diseases-would be catastrophic.’ He ended with a plea for peace, noting that ‘without peace we will simply go on treating symptoms of this crisis instead of addressing the cause.’

UNICEF’s Social Policy programme has supported the Ministry of Planning with the publication of the 40th edition of the Yemen Socio-Economic Update (YSEU). The edition focused on the “Prospects for Yemeni Economy, and Livelihoods Priorities”, and outlines three scenarios for the situation development. The First Scenario is the Optimistic scenario which assumes reaching an inclusive political settlement, punctuated by political and economic confidence-building steps. The second scenario “middle” assumes that current situation and conflict will continue sporadically, punctuated by slow and protracted political talks. The third scenario “pessimistic” assumes political blockage and widening military confrontations, and hence the growing economic and humanitarian cost and widening development gap between Yemen and other countries in the region.