Yemen + 1 more

Consolidated Appeals Process (CAP): Mid-Year Review - Yemen Humanitarian Response Plan 2010

Format
Evaluation and Lessons Learned
Source
Posted
Originally published

Attachments


1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The situation in Yemen is a complex mix of interlinked acute and chronic emergencies and needs. The situation is now becoming increasingly difficult for humanitarian actors to manage. Some of the challenges facing humanitarian organizations are insecurity in the north and lack of sustained access to hundreds of thousands of internally displaced people (IDPs), a significant refugee influx, and widespread and worrying levels of food insecurity and malnutrition. These challenges show no signs of amelioration in the near to medium term. The needs are growing, while resources are not keeping anywhere near the pace necessary to maintain operations and programmes. The Yemen Humanitarian Response Plan (YHRP) is only 31% funded as of this Mid-Year Review (MYR) (June 25).

The ceasefire in the northern conflict-affected governorates, agreed on February 11 between the Government and the Al-Houthis, continues to hold. However, progress is very slow in implementing the ceasefire conditions. The levels of damage and displacement are far greater than in previous rounds of fighting, and the humanitarian situation is precarious. The Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) currently estimates that there are some 342,000 IDPs throughout the five conflict-affected governorates of Hajjah, Amran, Sa'ada, Al-Jawf and Sana'a. In Sa'ada Governorate alone, there are an estimated 110,000 IDPs. The overwhelming majority of IDPs are not in camps, but in host communities. In addition, significant numbers of non-displaced people in Sa'ada Governorate suffer from lack of access to basic services and emergency relief assistance.

Due to the overall levels of insecurity, humanitarian organizations in the YHRP continue to have limited sustained access to many of these people, particularly in Sa'ada, Al-Jawf and northern Amran governorates. However, this does not mean that these people are not receiving assistance. Throughout the conflict, IDPs in Sa'ada City received assistance through local non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and the Yemen Red Crescent Society. Since the ceasefire, levels of assistance in these areas have improved. In addition, in Mandaba (northern Sa'ada Governorate, near the border with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia) during and since the conflict, cross-border actions have provided life-saving assistance to more than 12,000 IDPs in the area.

There are low levels of funding across all clusters and low Government capacity to handle the humanitarian situation. Therefore, even if access could be sustained there are limits on what could be done to meet IDPs' needs. The low level of funding is hampering humanitarian organizations' ability to deliver assistance and to plan. For example, as of May, the World Food Programme had to reduce by half the life-saving food rations provided to IDPs from the Sa'ada conflict. The Health Cluster and the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Cluster have been unable to extend their services to scattered populations, and many organizations have had to shift funding from development programmes. At the same time that the country and the humanitarian community are dealing with the effects of the war in the north, attention is also needed for the significant refugee presence, largely in the south of the country, and for high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition countrywide.

Despite these issues of access, capacity and funding, the humanitarian community in Yemen has made good progress since the beginning of the year in improving coordination structures; finding alternative means of providing assistance; providing assistance to increasing numbers of people; reaching newly accessible areas; and managing the limited resources provided so far. Registration of IDPs, initially a significant problem, has improved greatly. A review of projects led to a rigorous categorization into a three-tier framework of life-saving, time-critical and support services.

The strategic objectives stated in the YHRP in December remain valid. To continue saving lives and assisting and protecting hundreds of thousands of people, the organizations participating in this YHRP need revised requirements of US$ 187 million until the end of this year. As of the middle of June, donors had generously committed $57.6 million, leaving unmet requirements of $129.5 million. Far more is required: the HCT urges donors to fully fund the projects contained within this appeal.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Table I: Summary of requirements and funding (grouped by cluster)

Table II: Summary of requirements and funding (grouped by appealing organization)

Table III: Summary of requirements and funding (grouped by priority)

2. CHANGES IN THE CONTEXT, HUMANITARIAN NEEDS AND RESPONSE

3. PROGRESS TOWARDS ACHIEVING STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES AND SECTORAL TARGETS

3.1 STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

3.2 REVISED STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES AND SCENARIOS

3.3 REVISED CRITERIA FOR CATEGORIZATION OF PROJECTS

3.4 SECTOR RESPONSE PLANS

Food and Agriculture

Health

Nutrition

Protection

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene

Shelter/NFI/Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM)

Education

Early Recovery

Multi-Sector (Refugee Response)

Coordination and Support Services

4. FORWARD VIEW

ANNEX I: LIST OF PROJECTS AND FUNDING TABLES

Table IV: List of Appeal projects (grouped by cluster), with funding status of each

Table V: Total funding per donor (to projects listed in the Appeal)

Table VI: Total humanitarian assistance per donor (Appeal plus other*)

Table VII: Summary of funding to projects not listed in the Appeal

ANNEX II: ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

Please note that appeals are revised regularly. The latest version of this document is available on http://www.humanitarianappeal.net

Full project details can be viewed, downloaded and printed from www.reliefweb.int/fts

Note: The full text of this appeal is available on-line in Adobe Acrobat (pdf) format and may also be downloaded in zipped MS Word format.

Full Original Appeal [pdf* format] [zipped MS Word format]

* Get the Adobe Acrobat Viewer (free)

For additional copies, please contact:

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Palais des Nations
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CH - 1211 Geneva, Switzerland
Tel.: (41 22) 917.1972
Fax: (41 22) 917.0368
E-Mail: cap@reliefweb.int

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit https://www.unocha.org/.