WHO Zika Virus, Microcephaly and Guillain-Barré Syndrome Situation Report, 1 December 2016

Report
from World Health Organization
Published on 01 Dec 2016 View Original

KEY UPDATES

  • Countries and territories reporting mosquito-borne Zika virus infections for the first time in the past week:
    • None
  • Countries and territories reporting microcephaly and other central nervous system (CNS) malformations potentially associated with Zika virus infection for the first time in the past week:
    • None
  • Countries and territories reporting Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) cases associated with Zika virus infection for the first time in the past week:
  • The Plurinational State of Bolivia

ANALYSIS

  • Overall, the global risk assessment has not changed. Zika virus continues to spread geographically to areas where competent vectors are present. Although a decline in cases of Zika infection has been reported in some countries, or in some parts of countries, vigilance needs to remain high.

SITUATION

  • Seventy-five countries and territories (Fig. 1, Table 1) have reported evidence of mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission since 2007 (69 with reports from 2015 onwards), of which:
    • Fifty-eight with a reported outbreak from 2015 onwards (Fig. 2, Table 1).
    • Seven with having possible endemic transmission or evidence of local mosquito-borne Zika infections in 2016.
  • Ten with evidence of local mosquito-borne Zika infections in or before 2015, but without documentation of cases in 2016, or with the outbreak terminated.
  • Twelve countries have reported evidence of person-to-person transmission of Zika virus (Table 2).
  • Twenty-eight countries or territories have reported microcephaly and other CNS malformations potentially associated with Zika virus infection, or suggestive of congenital infection (Table 3).
  • Twenty countries or territories have reported an increased incidence of GBS and/or laboratory confirmation of a Zika virus infection among GBS cases (Table 4).
  • The first Zika case in Myanmar reported on 4 November was confirmed by the Ministry of Health and Sport (MoHS). According to the final case report, there have been no additional cases of Zika detected in the last month despite a community-wide search for Zika cases. The MoHS concluded that this case was not due to local mosquito-borne transmission but possibly through person-to-person transmission. The husband of the case had recent travel history to multiple countries that have reported evidence of local mosquito-borne Zika infections in 2016.