Latin America & the Caribbean: Weekly Situation Update (25 November-02 December 2019) As of 2 December 2019

KEY FIGURES

18 NAMED STORMS DURING THE 2019 ATLANTIC HURRICANE SEASON
4 CONSECUTIVE ABOVE-NORMAL HURRICANE SEASONS

KEY FACTS

Forecasts expect neutral El Niño conditions for 2020, which would benefit the first 2020 harvest season

THE CARIBBEAN: HURRICANE SEASON

The 2019 Atlantic hurricane season, which ends on 30 November, produced 18 named storms including six hurricanes, with three qualifying as major hurricanes.
Initial season outlooks from the United States National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration (NOAA) called for as many as 17 named storms, 5-9 hurricanes and 2-4 major hurricanes. The 2019 results marked the fourth consecutive year of above-normal activity in the Atlantic, only the second four-year period of above-normal activity in history after 1998-2001.
The 2019 season also saw five tropical cyclones form in the Gulf of Mexico, tying a record set in 2003 and 1957.
The season saw three major hurricanes (Dorian, Humberto and Lorenzo), with Dorian joining Gilbert (1988) and Wilma (2015) as the second strongest storms on record in the Atlantic basin in terms of wind speeds, which reached 185 mph.
The average season has 12 named storms, six hurricanes and three major hurricanes, according to NOAA.

HONDURAS: DENGUE

The Ministry of Health reports that there were 101,102 total cases of dengue in Honduras through Epidemiological Week 46 (10-16 November), with 19,240 cases of severe dengue. The areas most affected by severe dengue remain Cortés, Santa Bárbara, the metropolitan district of San Pedro Sula, and the metropolitan central district, home to the capital of Tegucigalpa. Cases for EW 46 are down from the previous week.
The outbreak, already the deadliest in Honduras’ history, claimed an additional eight lives between EW 45 and EW 46, bringing the total to 165 deaths, some 70 per cent of which are children and adolescents under 18.
Authorities continue to appeal to the public to contribute to prevention and mitigation measures to help slow down the outbreak and ease the burden on Honduras’ overrun public health system.

CENTRAL AMERICA: FOOD SECURITY

According to a recent FEWS Net food security outlook report, demand for temporary labor is beginning in Central America, which stands to improve food access. Poorer households who experienced losses in the first harvest (commonly known as the Primera) and with reduced labor opportunities and limited food supplies will still likely be face Integrated Food Security Phase
Classification (IPC) 2 (Stressed); those engaged in negative coping strategies will likely face IPC Phase 3 (Crisis).
The report forecasts neutral El Niño conditions for 2020, which should bring about a normal first rainy season that will benefit the 2020 Primera.

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
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