Joint Movement policy on MHPSS adopted at 33rd International Conference

No one is immune to the psychological, emotional and social consequences of armed conflict, natural disasters and other emergencies. But with the right support and care most people will be able to cope, resume functioning and recover emotionally. Unfortunately, around the world, 80 percent of people with mental health conditions are without any form of quality, affordable mental health care. Even before the crisis strikes.

Every day the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement is confronted with the extensive unmet mental health and psychosocial needs of people around the world. Needs that increase dramatically during armed conflicts, natural disasters and other emergencies. Needs that are often intensified when people are on the move. In conflict-affected areas more than one in five suffers from mental health conditions such as despression or anxiety.

The prevalence of mental health conditions is expected to more than double in a humanitarian crisis. While physical wounds may heal and houses are rebuilt with time, emotional wounds can linger long after the crisis is over. And they often remain hidden. People, especially children, carry the impact of traumatic events into their recovery and future. This may lead to an increase in suicide rates, impact livelihood and educational success.

It can have a negative influence on people’s health, wellbeing and life expectancy.

The 33rd International Conference of the Red Cross Red Crescent marked two important milestones in the field of mental health and psychosocial support: The adoption of a joint Movement policy and a resolution on Addressing mental health and psychosocial needs of people affected by armed conflicts, natural disasters and other emergencies.

The policy and the resolution is an important tool in the efforts of the Red Cross Red Crescent Movement’s effort to scale up and scale deep in our MHPSS response

Together, we can do more and reach further.

No one is immune to the psychological, emotional and social consequences of armed conflict, natural disasters and other emergencies. But with the right support and care most people will be able to cope, resume functioning and recover emotionally. Unfortunately, around the world, 80 percent of people with mental health conditions are without any form of quality, affordable mental health care. Even before the crisis strikes.

Every day the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement is confronted with the extensive unmet mental health and psychosocial needs of people around the world. Needs that increase dramatically during armed conflicts, natural disasters and other emergencies. Needs that are often intensified when people are on the move. In conflict-affected areas more than one in five suffers from mental health conditions such as depression or anxiety.

The prevalence of mental health conditions is expected to more than double in a humanitarian crisis While physical wounds may heal and houses are rebuilt with time, emotional wounds can linger long after the crisis is over. And they often remain hidden. People, especially children, carry the impact of traumatic events into their recovery and future. This may lead to an increase in suicide rates, impact livelihood and educational success.

It can have a negative influence on people’s health, wellbeing and life expectancy.

The 33rd International Conference of the Red Cross Red Crescent marked two important milestones in the field of mental health and psychosocial support: The adoption of a joint Movement policy and a resolution on Addressing mental health and psychosocial needs of people affected by armed conflicts, natural disasters and other emergencies.

The policy and the resolution is an important tool in the efforts of the Red Cross Red Crescent Movement’s effort to scale up and scale deep in our MHPSS response

Together, we can do more and reach further.