International Activity Report 2018

Report
from Médecins Sans Frontières
Published on 10 Jul 2019 View Original

THE YEAR IN REVIEW

By Dr Marc Biot, Dr Isabelle Defourny, Marcel Langenbach, Kenneth Lavelle, Bertrand Perrochet and Teresa Sancristoval, Directors of Operations

In 2018, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams provided medical and humanitarian assistance to people facing extreme hardship in over 70 countries. From treating war-wounded ever closer to frontlines in Yemen, to responding to epidemic outbreaks such as cholera in Niger, or providing assistance to people fleeing violence in the Central African Republic, emergency response continued to be a core part of our work.

As 2018 drew to a close, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) was in the midst of its second Ebola outbreak of the year, and its biggest ever. MSF was part of the response, led by the Ministry of Health. Although rapid and well-resourced, with teams having access to a promising new vaccine and several new drugs with the potential to better protect and treat people, the response, and those managing it, failed to adapt to people’s priorities, and to gain the trust of the community. This lack of trust in the health services meant people delayed or avoided seeking treatment. By the end of the year, the epidemic in North Kivu and Ituri provinces had claimed more than 360 lives and in some areas was still not under control.

Seeking care in war zones

Early in the year, Syrian civilians and medical staff were caught in the violence in Idlib, in the northwest, and in East Ghouta, near the capital Damascus. In East Ghouta, the barrage was relentless in February and March, with waves of dead and injured arriving at MSF- supported hospitals and health posts. As the siege blocked incoming aid, medical staff had few medical supplies to work with. By the end of the offensive, 19 of the 20 hospitals and clinics we supported were destroyed or abandoned, leaving civilians with few options to seek medical help.

The war in Yemen, which has left the country and its healthcare system in ruins, entered its fourth year. The Saudi- and Emirati-led coalition continued to target civilian areas with airstrikes and bombings, including our new cholera treatment centre in Abs. The war is taking a heavy toll on people, who often must negotiate constantly changing frontlines to find care for their war- wounds or their general medical needs. Yemen was the country where our teams treated the highest number of war-wounded in 2018, over 16,000 people. After a major offensive was launched in Hodeidah in June, doctors in our Aden hospital treated Hodeidah residents who had been driven for six hours, the majority of them in a critical condition. Conflict intensified on several frontlines at the end of the year, leading to an influx of people with war-related injuries. We also treated more than 150 people wounded by mines planted by Houthi-led Ansar Allah troops around Mocha. Constant attacks on our staff and patients at facilities in Ad Dhale forced us to withdraw from the town in November.