World

Global health sector strategies on, respectively, HIV, viral hepatitis and sexually transmitted infections for the period 2022-2030 [EN/AR/RU/ZH]

Attachments

GHSS 2022-2030

JUNE 2022

1 Ending epidemics in a new global health era

The 2022–2030 global health sector strategies on, respectively, HIV, viral hepatitis and sexually transmitted infections guide the health sector in implementing strategically focused responses to achieve the goals of ending AIDS, viral hepatitis B and C and sexually transmitted infections by 2030. Building on the achievements and lessons learned under the 2016-2021 global health sector strategies, the 2022-2030 strategies consider the epidemiological, technological and contextual shifts of recent years, foster learnings across the disease areas, and create opportunities to leverage innovations and new knowledge for effective responses to HIV, viral hepatitis and sexually transmitted infections. The strategies recommend shared and disease-specific country actions for the next eight years, supported by actions by WHO and partners.

Each country should define the populations that are most affected and at risk for HIV, viral hepatitis and sexually transmitted infections and commit to actions that respond to local epidemiological and health system contexts while upholding fundamental human rights and through a focus on equitable access to health and evidence-informed practice.

The 2022-2030 strategies underline the critical role of the health sector in ending these epidemics, acknowledging that a multisectoral “Health in All Policies” approach is required to remove structural and systemic barriers to accelerating progress. The strategies call for a more precise focus to reach the people most affected and at risk for each disease and to address inequities. They promote synergies under a universal health coverage and primary health care framework and contribute to achieving the goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

1.1 Major epidemics with uneven progress

HIV, viral hepatitis and sexually transmitted infections collectively cause 2.3 million deaths and 1.2 million cases of cancer each year, and continue to impose a major public health burden worldwide. More than 1 million people are newly infected with sexually transmitted infections each day, and 4.5 million with HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C, each year. Although progress has been made in all three disease areas, the global response is off-track and most global health targets for 2020 were missed (Box 1.1). The full benefits of available tools and technologies are not being realized, many populations are left behind, and structural, systemic and financial barriers to accelerating progress persist. The COVID-19 pandemic has further hampered progress, and accelerated action is needed to end these epidemics.