Desert Locust Bulletin 412 (January 2013) [EN/AR]

Report
from Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Published on 04 Feb 2013

General Situation during January 2013
Forecast until mid-March 2013

The Desert Locust situation deteriorated further in the winter breeding areas along the Red Sea during January. Locust numbers increased substantially as eggs hatched and hoppers formed numerous groups and bands in southeast Egypt, Sudan, northeast Eritrea and in Saudi Arabia. Swarms were also reported in these countries. Control operations were undertaken, including aerial operations in Sudan and Saudi Arabia. There is a high risk that a second generation of breeding will occur in the coming months that will cause locust numbers to increase further. All efforts are required to control the infestations in order to reduce potential migration to the spring breeding areas in the interior of Saudi Arabia. In Northwest Africa, groups and at least one small swarm formed in the Western Sahara and moved into adjacent areas of northwest Mauritania, and control operations were undertaken. The situation remained calm in the Sahel of West Africa.

Western Region. The locust situation continued to improve in the region during January. Nevertheless, hopper groups and small bands formed in the southern Western Sahara that gave rise to small adult groups, which moved into adjacent areas of northwest Mauritania where at least one small swarm was reported near the coast. Limited control operations were carried out in Morocco and Mauritania. In Algeria, a few egg-laying adult groups were treated near irrigated areas in the central Sahara. In the Sahel, locust numbers continued to decline in northern Niger where only isolated adults remained in the Air Mountains. During the forecast period, low numbers of locusts will persist in parts of northwest Mauritania, in adjacent areas of the Western Sahara, and in parts of northern Mali and Niger. An increasing number of adults are likely to appear along the southern side of the Atlas Mountains in Morocco and Algeria as temperatures warm up in March and small-scale breeding could occur in areas that receive rainfall.

Central Region. Locust numbers increased significantly during January along the coastal plains in southeast Egypt, Sudan, northeast Eritrea, and in Saudi Arabia where hopper bands and swarms formed. Although substantial control operations were carried out in Sudan, Saudi Arabia, and Egypt and, to a lesser extent, in Eritrea, a second generation of breeding is likely to occur during the forecast period that would cause locust numbers to increase further and more hopper bands and swarms to form. Survey and control operations must continue in order to reduce the number of infestations and their migration to the large and vast spring breeding areas in the interior of Saudi Arabia from March onwards. Elsewhere, isolated adults were present on the northern coast of Oman where small-scale breeding could occur if rains fall.

Eastern Region. No locusts were reported in the region during January. Low numbers of adults are likely to appear in a few areas on the coast of Baluchistan in western Pakistan and southeast Iran, and breed on a small scale in areas that receive rainfall. No significant developments are likely.