The central Mediterranean route: the deadliest migration route - InFocus 2, March 2018

Report
from Mixed Migration Hub
Published on 31 Mar 2018 View Original

The increase in the numbers of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers traveling in mixed migratory movements continues to be a major political and humanitarian challenge. North Africa is affected as a region of origin, transit and destination for those who have left their homes fleeing war, conflict, discrimination, and those seeking to improve their opportunities and to build a better future. North Africa is a complex migratory hub characterized by major inter-regional movements which in the last several years has witnessed a large increase in the numbers of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers looking to reach Europe.
Equally, thousands of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers continue to be claimed by the Mediterranean as they attempt the journey by sea from North Africa. This document aims to shed some light on the factors contributing to the increased risk to life and safety along one of the world’s deadliest migration routes.

THE ROUTES

The Mediterranean is home to three main migratory routes used by migrants, refugees and asylum seekers to cross irregularly into Europe. They are the Central Mediterranean Route (CMR) which refers to the sea journey from North Africa (mainly Libya) to Italy, the Eastern Mediterranean Route (EMR) which refers to the sea crossing from Turkey to Greece and the Western Mediterranean Route (WMR), the sea crossing from Morocco to mainland Spain and land crossings into the Spanish enclaves of Ceuta and Melilla.
While the number of arrivals through the EMR had decreased significantly in recent years, and some decreases were recorded along the CMR, the Mediterranean continues to be a major transit point. The CMR saw its largest arrival numbers in 2016, with 181,436 migrants, refugees and asylum seekers arriving to Italy by sea. 2017 saw the arrival of 119,369 persons which marked a 34% decrease from the previous year. Between 1 January and 14 February 2018, 8,407 migrants, refugees and asylum seekers have arrived by sea to Italy, Spain, Greece and Cyprus through the Central and Western Mediterranean Routes. (1) Children are increasingly making up a significant portion of those traveling and accounting for 14.7% (2) of all travelers. Furthermore, 92% of all children arriving to Italy between January and September of 2017 were unaccompanied or separated.