Tanzania + 2 more

UNICEF Tanzania Situation Report Burundi Refugee Response February 2017

Format
Situation Report
Source
Posted
Originally published

Attachments

Highlights

  • Tanzania is host to largest number of Burundian refugees in the region. 298,439 refugees from Burundi and the DRC are sheltered in three refugee camps in northern Tanzania.

  • The current influx of refugees into Tanzania from Burundi averages between 600 and 700 people per day.

  • Children are bearing the brunt of the crisis, as 57 per cent of the Burundian and DRC refugee population is under the age of 18 and 22 per cent are under five.

  • Only 52 per cent of school aged children are attending school in the three refugee camps.

  • Over 50,000 people in Mtendeli camp are covered by only one health clinic, where one clinician attends to 70-90 patients a day.

  • The per cent of facility deliveries has significantly increased over the past year and currently stands at 98 per cent in Mtendeli and Nyarugusu refugee camps.

Situation in Numbers

Key Figures

236,434 New refugee arrivals from Burundi and DRC (plus births) since May 2015 (UNHCR 19/02/17)

298,439 Total refugees living in the three camps in Tanzania - combined old and new caseloads (UNHCR 19/02/17)

131,479 Refugee children (0-17 years of age) currently living in the 3 camps in Tanzania (UNHCR 19/02/17)

Situation Overview and Humanitarian Needs

Tanzania hosts the largest number of Burundian refugees in the Eastern and Southern Africa region, and when combined with the pre-existing caseload of refugees from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), the total number of refugees in Tanzania is 298,439. The current influx of refugees into Tanzania from Burundi averages between 600 and 700 people per day. While the socio-political situation in Burundi remains tense and unpredictable, cross-border influxes are expected to continue throughout 2017.

Refugees in Tanzania are hosted in three refugee camps (Nyarugusu, Mtendeli and Nduta) located along the Burundian boarder. Although the government and partner assistance continues, all three refugee camps are beyond their intended capacity and the delays in finding a suitable fourth camp site is leading to overcrowding and stretching of resources, particularly for water, health clinics and space for schools.
Children are bearing the brunt of the crisis, as 57 per cent of the Burundian and DRC refugee population is under the age of 18 and 22 per cent are under five. With overstretched health and nutrition facilities as well as water and sanitation shortages, the risk of disease among the population is increasing. Protection concerns such as sexual and gender-based violence are significant, while inadequate numbers of schools are making it difficult for children to access quality education.