Tanzania

Tanzania: 2015/16 food security and vulnerability situation - Food & Livelihoods Insecurity (VAC 2015 Results)

Attachments

Summary of the 2015/16 Tanzania food security and vulnerability situation based on the results of the 2015 vulnerability assessment.

Crop Production Season Overview 2014/15
Major hazards/shocks in 2014/2015 season

• Rainfall onset: Late onset of seasonal rains (Long rains-Masika).

• Dry spells: Prolonged dry spell in all seasons (Vuli, Masika and Msimu).

• Rainfall distribution: Poor rainfall distribution in all three seasons (Nov-Dec 2014 short rain season, Nov 2014 – April 2015 rain season and March – April, 2015 long rain season).

• Destructive animals Vuli rainfall season (October –December, 2014 season over bimodal areas)

• Mostly above average rainfall performance but poor distribution caused wilting of crops leading to poor crop production in those areas.
Masika rainfall season (March –May, 2015 season over bimodal areas)

• Mostly above average to average rainfall performance but late onset caused crop failure leading to crop poor production in those areas.
Msimu rainfall season (November 2014–April, 2015 season over unimodal areas)

• Mostly average rainfall performance but poor rainfall distribution and long dry spell durations at tasselling and flowering stages caused crop failure leading to poor crop production in those areas.

•Central areas of the country are expected to have below average food production due to poor seasonal rainfall distribution.

• Western areas are expected to have average food production except few districts in Tabora region which are expected to have below average production.

• Southern regions are expected to have below average food production due to poor rainfall distribution .• Northern regions are expected to have below average crop production due to late onset of masika seasonal rains leading to shorter season and crop failure.

Key Outcomes & Findings 2014/15

• 21 councils were identified to be under stress.

• 424,136 people (7% of the total) in 21 councils were identified to be food and nutrition insecure.

• 9,916.9 MT of maize equivalent was recommended for this population between March and April, 2015 • However, 1,148,288 people were projected to be food insecure in May 2015.

• Market condition: Staple food prices were showing increasing trend from January 2015.

• Livestock's condition was good favored by pasture and water availability.

Key Recommendations

• Continuous monitoring of areas identified to be at risk of food and nutrition insecurity between June and September 2015.

• To provide food and seed aid.

• To promote households good use practice of food crop harvested during the 2014/15 production year.

• Improvement and construction of roads in the rural areas.

• Enhancement of rehabilitation and establishment of irrigation schemes.

• Promote the use of early maturing and drought tolerant crops like cassava and millet.

• Strengthening of the livestock early warning system to ensure sustainable food security.

• Continue to strengthen input supplies programme to smallholder farmers.

• Strengthen construction of water facilities such as boreholes and dams in areas with poor or low access to safe drinking water.

• Distribution of subsidies seeds and fertilizers for next production year.

• The government should be in the fore front to spread the collective warehouse based marketing system to as many regions and districts as possible to provide markets for food crops.

Disclaimer

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
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