Tanzania

IPC in Zanzibar Tanzania: Acute Food Insecurity Situation: July – September 2017

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KEY HIGHLIGHTS

  • This is the first IPC analysis conducted in Zanzibar. The analysis conducted in five out of 11 districts of Zanzibar in July 2017, and was led by Zanzibar Food Security and Nutrition Monitoring – Technical Working Group with the support of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations. The analysis was conducted for the period of July to September 2017 and projection was made for the period of October to December 2017.

  • Around 18,000 (2%) of the assessed population from Micheweni and Kaskazini A Districts A are in Emergency (IPC Phase 4), and are facing food gaps requiring immediate assistance.

  • Generally, the food security situation in two districts Micheweni and Kaskazini A indicate that about 25% and 20% of the population are in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) respectively, representing 28,000 people in Micheweni and 25,000 in Kaskazini A.

  • The main causes of the current food insecurity in Zanzibar are failed Vuli rainfall season (October to December) in 2016/17, heavy rains at the end of the Masika rainy season which affected planted crops and infrastructure and high food prices.

  • Resilience building initiatives are desired to protect household food consumption as well as income generation activities for about 69% population in IPC Phase 2 (Stressed)

OVERVIEW

Recent weather extremes (drought and floods) experienced in the isles for two consecutive cropping seasons (Vuli 2016 and Masika 2017) has left substantial number of people affected. To assess the situation and understand the impact, the Revolutionary Government of Zanzibar conducted the first IPC analysis in July, 2017 in five districts out of total eleven (11) districts, of which 2 in Pemba (Micheweni and Mkoani) and 3 in Unguja (Kaskazini “A”, Magharibi and Kusini). The assessment led by the Zanzibar Food Security and Nutrition Monitoring – Technical Working Group with the support of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations. The analysis was conducted for the period of July to September 2017 and projection was made for the period of October to December 2017.
The assessment revealed that food security status of 30% (about 33,000 people) and 25% (about 31,000 people) of the assessed population in the two districts i.e. Micheweni and Kaskazini “A”, respectively, are in IPC Phase 3 and above. This indicates that urgent action is required in these areas to protect livelihoods, reduce food consumption gaps and reduce acute malnutrition.

Generally, findings of the assessment shows that majority of the assessed households (69%) are Stressed (IPC Phase 2), only able to afford minimally adequate food consumption but are unable to afford essential non-food expenditures without engaging in irreversible coping strategies. The Households most affected were those who depend on agriculture production in both Unguja and Pemba and those impacted by floods in Pemba.