Ukraine

Ukraine: Humanitarian Impact Situation Report (As of 3:00 p.m. (EET) on 18 March 2022) [EN/RU/UK]

Attachments

This report is produced by OCHA Ukraine in collaboration with humanitarian partners. It covers the period from 3 p.m. (EET) 17 March to 3 p.m. (EET) 18 March.

KEY FIGURES (FLASH APPEAL 2022)

12M people in need
(Source: 2022 Flash Appeal)

6M people targeted
(Source: 2022 Flash Appeal)

$1.1B funding required (US$)
(Source: 2022 Flash Appeal)

36% funded
(Source: FTS)

HIGHLIGHTS

• Now in its fourth week, the ongoing military offensive has already caused 2,149 civilian casualties, including 816 killed, according to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). The actual figures are likely much higher as fierce clashes continue across the country.

• Nearly 6.5 million people have been forcibly displaced within Ukraine, adding to the almost 3.3 million and counting who have fled the country since 24 February. Combined, the number of internally displaced persons (IDPs) and those who have fled to other countries amount to around 9.8 million people – more than 23 per cent of the country’s population.

• On 18 March, the first UN-organized convoy, including relief items from the international non-governmental organization (INGO) People in Need (PIN) and four UN entities (UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), World Food Programme (WFP) and World Health Organization (WHO), reached Sumy (Sumska oblast, north-east). The convoy delivered 130 tons of much-needed medical supplies, bottled water, ready-to-eat meals and canned food for 35,000 people as well as essential equipment for the repair of water systems that will help improve access to water for some 50,000 people.

• The situation in Mariupol (Donetska oblast, east) continues to deteriorate. The city’s Deputy Mayor Serhii Orlov says that the estimated death toll of more than 2,350 people is likely as much as two times higher. Mariupol’s City Council reports that around 80 per cent of the city’s housing stock has been affected by ongoing hostilities, with nearly 30 per cent estimated to be damaged beyond the point of repair.

• In the southern city of Mykolaiv (Mykolaivska oblast, south), Human Rights Watch claims that cluster munition rockets – which are subject to an international treaty ban on account of their widespread indiscriminate effects and the long-lasting dangers they pose to civilians – were repeatedly fired into the densely populated city on three separate occasions between 7 and 13 March, causing several civilian casualties and damaging homes, businesses and other civilian infrastructure.

SITUATION OVERVIEW

Now in its fourth week, the military offensive in Ukraine continues to generate increasing civilian casualties and grave humanitarian consequences. As of 17 March, OHCHR reports 2,149 civilian casualties, including 816 killed, figures that are likely much higher. These include 903 reported casualties in Donetska and Luhanska oblasts (172 killed and 503 injured in Government-controlled areas (GCA), and 50 killed and 178 injured in non-Government-controlled areas (NGCA) and 1,246 civilian casualties in other parts of Ukraine.

Ongoing hostilities in Ukraine continue to drive unprecedented levels of displacement both inside the country and across international borders. The International Organization for Migration (IOM) conducted a representative survey of the general population in Ukraine to gather initial insights into internal displacement and mobility flows. The methodology and results of the survey were reviewed by the Protection Cluster, OCHA, UNHCR and REACH, and the group agreed that IOM’s survey provided a credible population figure for internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Ukraine, which is now estimated at 6.48 million, adding to the almost 3.3 million and counting who have fled the country since 24 February, according to UNHCR.

Combined, the number of IDPs and those who have fled to other countries amount to around 9.8 million people – more than 23 per cent of the country’s population. In a context characterized by large-scale and complex movements, the risks of gender-based violence (GBV), human trafficking, and sexual exploitation and abuse have risen exponentially both within and outside Ukraine. As such, Accountability to Affected Populations and protection considerations must be at the heart of all response activities.

On 17 March, the Government of Ukraine reported that nearly 6,000 people – most from the southern city of Mariupol and small towns across Kyivska oblast, including Borodianka, Brovary and Shevchenko – were evacuated along eight of the nine agreed-upon evacuation corridors. Meanwhile, the Russian Federation reports that around 300,000 people have crossed the border from Ukraine towards Russia since the escalation of hostilities. This includes people who have reportedly been evacuated and those who have crossed the border seeking refuge on their own. The UN does not have means to verify the actual numbers of people evacuated.

Early on 18 March, multiple missile strikes reportedly destroyed the Lviv State Aircraft Repair Facility (Lvivska oblast, west) – located just 6 km from the city centre of Lviv – as ongoing hostilities continue to spread further west. In the past two weeks, there has been an increase in attacks on both military and civilian infrastructure in western Ukraine, including against airports and military facilities in Ivano-Frankivska (west), Lvivska and Volynska (north-west) oblasts.

Eastern Ukraine continues to bear the brunt of the ongoing military offensive as ongoing hostilities have flared up in recent days. The current situation is only exacerbating pre-existing vulnerabilities and unmet humanitarian needs that have accumulated over the last eight years of active fighting in Donetska and Luhanska oblasts (east).

On 17 March, in the town of Merefa (Kharkivska oblast, east) – about 25 km south-west of Kharkiv – at least 21 people were reportedly killed and other 25 injured, 10 of whom remain in serious condition, following relentless shelling. The next day, on 18 March in neighbouring Donetska oblast, local officials report that a missile strike killed at least two people and injured six others in the city of Kramatorsk.

In the southern Khersonska oblast, oblast authorities say the number of people without access to water and electricity continues to increase, reaching 45,750 as of 17 March – an increase of about 1,250 compared to the day before. Overall, more than 65 settlements have no access to electricity, while nearly 20 only have partial access to power. As of 16 March, the Ministry of Energy says that more than 933,000 users across Ukraine remain without electricity.

In the southern city of Mykolaiv, Human Rights Watch claims that cluster munition rockets – which are subject to an international treaty ban on account of their widespread indiscriminate effects and the long-lasting dangers they pose to civilians – were repeatedly fired into the densely populated city on three separate occasions between 7 and 13 March, causing several civilian casualties and damaging homes, businesses and other civilian infrastructure.

The situation in Mariupol continues to get worse by the hour. The city’s Deputy Mayor Serhii Orlov says that the estimated death toll of more than 2,350 people is likely as much as two times higher in reality, as there are still many people trapped under the rubble. Mr. Orlov adds that 80-90 per cent of the city has been bombed since 24 February, leaving almost all buildings in the city either damaged or destroyed.

The City Council of Mariupol says the city is being hit by 50 to 100 artillery shells every day, forcing hundreds of thousands of people into hiding in overcrowded shelters and basements with limited food and water. According to the City Council, around 80 per cent of Mariupol’s housing stock has been affected by ongoing hostilities, with nearly 30 per cent estimated to be damaged beyond the point of repair.

Disclaimer

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit https://www.unocha.org/.