Ukraine + 8 more

Ukraine: Humanitarian Impact Situation Report (As of 12:00 p.m. (EET) on 18 April 2022)

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HIGHLIGHTS

• Even though hostilities continue to be concentrated in the eastern and southern parts of Ukraine, several oblasts across the country have been affected by missile strikes, reportedly resulting in multiple civilian casualties and damages to civilian infrastructure.

• On 16 April, four staff members of World Central Kitchen (WCK) were injured in one of the restaurants operated by the WCK in Kharkiv (Kharkivska oblast, east) as a result of an attack on the city, according to the WCK CEO.

• The number of people displaced by the ongoing fighting has now surpassed the 12-million mark: over 4.9 million people have crossed international borders and at least 7.1 million have been displaced internally since 24 February.

• The World Food Programme (WFP) has reached more than 1.5 million affected and displaced people in Ukraine with food and cash assistance to date.

• The UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) has provided aid to around 250,000 people through the distribution of non-food items (NFI), hygiene kits and food assistance.

• Since 24 February, Direct Relief has provided over 250 tons of medical aid and almost 50 million doses of medicines. Direct Relief has also shipped 14 million doses of levothyroxine, a drug used to treat impaired thyroid function, for further distribution among health facilities in Ukraine.

SITUATION OVERVIEW

General humanitarian situation. Even though hostilities continue to be concentrated in the eastern and southern parts of Ukraine, several oblasts across the country have been affected by missile strikes, reportedly resulting in multiple civilian casualties and damage to civilian infrastructure. Apart from the areas that were affected by hostilities in the past week (eastern Donetska, Kharkivska and Luhanska oblasts, and southern Khersonska oblast), damage and civilian casualties were also reported in Dnipropetrovska (centre), Kirovohradska (centre), Kyivska (north), Lvivska (west), Mykolaivska (south) and Poltavska (centre) oblasts.

On 16 April, WCK CEO Nate Mook informed that one of the WCK-operated restaurants in Kharkiv was severely damaged reportedly as a result of a missile strike, injuring four WCK staff members. This incident comes shortly after the statement published by Caritas last week, confirming the deaths of two of its staff members and five of their relatives in Mariupol (Donetska oblast) in mid-March. In response to the Mariupol incident, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator Martin Griffiths called upon the parties of the conflict to respect their obligations under international humanitarian law to protect civilians.

As hostilities rage on, the civilian toll of the ongoing fighting continues to grow. As of 17 April, the number of civilian casualties since 24 February 2022 stands at 4,890, including 2,072 killed and 2,818 injured, according to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). Most of the civilian casualties recorded were caused by the use of explosive weapons with a wide impact area, including shelling from heavy artillery, multiple launch rocket systems and airstrikes. OHCHR believes the actual figures are considerably higher, as the receipt of information from some locations where intense hostilities have been going on has been delayed, and many reports are still pending corroboration.

Impacts on food and nutrition. According to the Ukrainian Minister of Agriculture Mykola Soskyi, even if the fighting ended tomorrow, the wave of high prices for basic food commodities would still be felt globally for another three-to-five years. As reported earlier, Ukraine, along with the Russian Federation, is one of the world’s top producers and exporters of staples, including wheat and barley, maize and sunflower oil. Mr. Sokyi further explained that even if agricultural production were able to continue now, Ukraine then faces the problem of how to export grain and other products in the current circumstances.

According to the Minister, there is now a significant surplus of oil and grain in Ukraine. The latter is about 20 million tons and the remnants of wheat stand at twice the domestic demand. Reportedly, certain logistics chains are already operating on the borders with Hungary, Poland and Romania, but the neck of export routes is still too narrow, while the demand is high. Last week, the UN Secretary-General António Guterres presented the first detailed brief of the Global Crisis Response Group on Food, Energy and Finance (GCRG), which was set up to study the effects of the war in Ukraine on the most vulnerable. In its brief, GCRG warned that the Ukraine crisis risks tipping up to 1.7 billion people — over one-fifth of the global population — into poverty, destitution and hunger.

Impacts on migrants’ rights. The Euro-Mediterranean Human Rights Monitor (EMHRM) has described in a 17 April report Ukraine’s reported detention of dozens of migrants during the current conflict as “inhumane and unjustifiable.” The organization says that around 45 migrants are reportedly being held at the Zhuravychi Migrant Accommodation Centre in Volynska oblast (west) after having attempted to cross the border into Poland and been handed over to the Ukrainian authorities. EMHRM also reports that, after summary court proceedings without any legal counseling or the possibility to claim asylum, the migrants were sentenced to between 6 and 18 months of detention for irregular crossing. The organization describes the conditions at the accommodation centre as difficult even before the recent escalation, which has “significantly worsened” since. The EMHRM report includes descriptions of reported intimidation and violence at the Zhuravychi centre and concludes that its location places dozens of Afghan, Bangladeshi, Indian, Pakistani and Sudanese nationals at risk solely because of their irregular migration status.

Eastern Ukraine. The fiercest fighting reportedly continues to take place in eastern Ukraine, primarily in Donetska and Luhanska oblasts and in parts of Kharkivska oblast. According to the President of Ukraine Volodymyr Zelenskyy, between 13 and 17 April, 18 civilians were reportedly killed and another 106 injured as a result of active fighting and airstrikes in Kharkiv alone. Dozens of civilian casualties and scores of homes and other civilian infrastructure damaged were also reported in both Government- and non-Government-controlled parts of Donetska and Luhanska oblast, according to Ukrainian local authorities and entities in non-Government-controlled areas (NGCA).

Southern Ukraine. According to the mayor of Mykolaiv (Mykolaivska oblast), on 15 April, 39 civilians were reportedly injured as a result of an alleged attack on the city. Moreover, Mykolaivska oblast Governor Vitaliy Kim informed that the city of Mykolaiv and the surrounding areas had reportedly been under continuous rocket attacks since 17 April, already resulting in damage to power lines and water infrastructure. In addition, according to the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Cluster, Mykolaiv has now been without piped water for four days, forcing people to use water from streams and rivers.

Western Ukraine. The city of Lviv (Lvivska oblast), hosting dozens of diplomatic missions and international organizations that relocated from Kyiv, was reportedly hit by several missiles on 18 April, reportedly leaving seven people killed and 11 injured, according to local authorities. The city of Lviv was reportedly last affected by hostilities on 28 March, when the Aircraft Repair Plant was allegedly destroyed. Meanwhile, the incident that happened earlier today is likely the first one that caused civilian casualties, although OHCHR has not yet confirmed the information about the casualties.

Displacement. The number of people displaced by the ongoing fighting has now surpassed the 12-million mark: over 4.9 million people have crossed international borders and at least 7.1 million have been displaced internally since 24 February.

Between 15 and 17 April, according to the Ministry for Reintegration of Ukraine, more than 4,300 civilians were evacuated from areas affected by hostilities. Evacuations from Luhanska oblast have reportedly become more complicated as the fighting intensifies, and on 17 April, it was allegedly impossible to evacuate people from Lysychansk (Luhanska oblast) due to continuous shelling. Further, no evacuation routes were reportedly agreed upon for 18 April, according to the Ministry for Reintegration. Separately, the Russian Federation reported that, since 24 February, more than 863,600 people, including more than 158,170 children, have crossed into its territory. The UN does not have the means to verify the number of people who crossed international borders reported by the UN Member States. At the same time, as of 17 April, UNHCR estimates that over 522,000 people have sought refuge in the Russian Federation.

Disclaimer

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit https://www.unocha.org/.