Ukraine

Protecting & prioritising people with specific needs in the Ukrainian humanitarian response, May 2022 [EN/UK]

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WHO IS THIS DOCUMENT FOR?

This document provides guidance for humanitarian and development actors on how to address protection risks and socio-economic vulnerabilities in their work, and highlights aspects to consider in operations to ensure a protection focused response adapted to the different needs of the affected population in Ukraine.

MANY IDPS AND CONFLICT AFFECTED PEOPLE ARE IN NEED – WHY A PROTECTION AND VULNERABILITY FOCUS?

THOSE MOST IN NEED

Millions of people in Ukraine have been affected by the conflict. Within populations, certain individuals and groups may be more vulnerable than others being exposed to distinct protection risks due to their individual factors. It is necessary, and a priority, to identify such individuals or groups, enhance their resilience and address specific needs stemming from specific vulnerabilities, through protection services that are gender and age sensitive.

NEED FOR PRIORITIZATION

Funding and resource constraints mean that humanitarian and development assistance needs to be targeted based on certain criteria. Prioritization should be done bearing in mind protection risks, gender roles and socio-economic vulnerability concerns.

ENSURING THAT YOU HAVE THE FULL PICTURE

Including disaggregated data [details of gender, age, marital status, household composition, disability, economic situation, serious medical conditions, priorities and capabilities, and also conduct gender analysis] in assessments and when deciding on who-where-what-when-how to support will result in a fuller picture related to needs.

COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION AND INCLUSION must be ensured at all stages of targeting in an inclusive, timely, systematic and transparent manner. Ensure that it is broad-based and allows community participation (men, women, persons with disabilities, older people, children, LGBTIQ+ people, ethnic minorities) in all phases of the program: (i) assessment phase of whom to support; (ii) in deciding what type of assistance; (iii) when and how information is shared with beneficiaries; and (iv) during implementation.

AVOID UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES AND FUTURE PROTECTION ISSUES

How assistance is provided and to whom can create tension among IDPs, conflictaffected people and host communities. It is essential that the community understands how and why prioritization was done, informing women, girls, men and boys of the resources available and how to influence the project, so it is important to establish transparent and regular communication. It is also important to include accountability mechanisms and maintain feedback for women, girls, men and boys as part of protection in all programs, to allow affected populations to report gaps and misconduct that exacerbates or creates protection risks.

PRIORITIZATION CRITERIA SHOULD BE HUMAN-RIGHTS BASED, EVIDENCE-BASED, RELEVANT AND ACCURATE

Assessments, gender analysis, and surveys – ensure that data and details on vulnerable groups (disaggregated by gender and age) are included so you can identify them and address their needs in line with international human-rights standards. It is important to make sure that data collection is inclusive and captures the specific needs of LGBTIQ+, minority groups, persons with disabilities, etc. - and in cases quantitative data is not available, consider other qualitative sources indicating protection risks and needs of specific population groups as a reference for prioritization. This is the basis for an inclusive programming adapted to the needs of affected populations. Partners are encouraged to use the IASC Gender with Age Marker (GAM) as a tool to assess to which extent programs address gender- and age-related differences in the design and implementation of humanitarian programs.

CAN YOU PROVIDE A LIST OF THOSE MOST VULNERABLE THAT SHOULD BE PRIORITIZED? There is no generic prioritization list. Each organization should assess vulnerability for each project, in a participatory manner, at the planning stage before a humanitarian response or development project is initiated. Ensure that vulnerability assessments integrate gender analysis and that projects have a gender equality component.