Uganda

Rainy season may increase cholera cases — Ministry of health

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By Vicky Wandawa

According to a statement from the ministry, with the rainy season contamination of water sources and floods, washing away the latrines are expected to aggravate the risk factors.

CHOLERA

KAMPALA - The beginning of the second rainy season (September-November) is likely to spike the number of cholera cases, the ministry of health has warned.

According to a statement from the ministry, with the rainy season contamination of water sources and floods, washing away the latrines are expected to aggravate the risk factors.

Since June 2019, the cholera outbreak has affected five districts in Uganda namely Kyegegwa, Bududa, Kisoro, Isingiro, and Busia where cases have been reported with two deaths so far.

“This week on Tuesday, 12 cases were investigated and cholera was confirmed among patients who reported at Nabulola Health Center and Dubani Mission hospital in Busia district,” reads the statement.

In order to contain the outbreaks, the ministry of health with the local governments and development partners is carrying out measures to avert further spread.

There is intensified health education for hygiene improvement, with emphasis on handwashing with water and soap, keeping clean homes, covering food and eating hot food.

Cholera treatment centers have been established in each of the affected districts for the management of cases. Additional medicines have been provided to replenish the stock already used in affected districts.

“For the districts such as Bududa which faced a landslide, targeted Oral Cholera Vaccination (OCV) was carried out in 23 parishes where cases were reported,” reads the communiqué.

Symptoms of cholera begin to show in just a few hours or as long as five days after infection. About one in 20 people infected are faced with severe watery diarrhea accompanied by vomiting, which can quickly lead to dehydration. Although many infected people may have minimal or no symptoms, they can still contribute to the spread of the infection.

The public is further urged to be vigilant and report any suspected cholera cases and other strange deaths to the nearest health facility, or call our toll-free line, 0800-100-066.