Consolidated Appeals Process (CAP): Appeal 2009 for Uganda

Report
from UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Published on 19 Nov 2008


1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The situation across much of conflict-affected northern Uganda continues to progress along the transition from humanitarian to recovery and development action. In 2009, distinct humanitarian needs will continue to require a coordinated international response, even as recovery and development is recognised as the dominant paradigm across the majority of existing areas of operation. Indeed, the humanitarian action outlined in the 2009 Consolidated Appeal for Uganda should be considered as an essential support to promote further gains such as those made since the signing of the original Cessation of Hostilities between the Government of Uganda and the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) in August 2006, despite the lack of a conclusive end to the peace process. It is vital, however, that added urgency be placed on increasing the impact of recovery and development activities by both the Government of Uganda and the international community in their areas of comparative advantage in order to consolidate these peace dividends.

By contrast, a third consecutive year of drought, below-normal harvests and animal disease, coupled with the historic marginalisation of the region, has jeopardised the food, nutritional and livelihood security of up to 800,000 people in Karamoja (80% of the region's population). The severity of the crisis has and will continue to necessitate targeted humanitarian actions complementing longer-term development programming, which will prove the sole means of ensuring that this vulnerable region attains a similar level of development as the rest of the country.

Additionally, continued vulnerability to natural hazards, particularly drought, floods and outbreaks of infectious human, animal and crop diseases, and weak existing capacity at local and district levels to prepare for and respond to potential disasters mandate action be taken to strengthen disaster preparedness and response capacity in keeping with the Hyogo Framework. The continued presence of more than 146,400 refugees also requires humanitarian action to meet the needs of those who have sought shelter in the country.

Overall, four separate spheres of humanitarian needs are seen to require a concerted response in the coming year, corresponding to four distinct regions of the country: Acholi, Teso, Karamoja and the refugee-hosting areas of West Nile/Western Uganda. Thus, the 2009 CAP has been developed and is presented according to the regional specificities at play – particularly with regard to the response plans developed by the clusters/sectors. However, three strategic objectives have been commonly arrived at through the individual regional consultations, These are: 1) to supplement government efforts to provide basic services that save lives and alleviate suffering, as the basis for creating the conditions for achieving the three durable solutions; 2) to enhance food and nutritional security to save lives, alleviate suffering and kick-start livelihoods; and 3) to contribute to strengthening district capacity for emergency preparedness and response.

Reflecting both the diversity of regional humanitarian contexts and the commonality of strategic objectives developed throughout the CAP 2009 process, all projects have been prioritised on a regional basis, according to the weighted importance of the 2009 strategic objectives to which they respond.

Thus, in Acholi, the specific context and planned response emphasizes the humanitarian needs of the region's remaining population of internally displaced persons (IDPs), particularly those of extremely vulnerable individuals (EVIs) who face additional challenges to the achievement of a durable solution to their displacement, as well as for vulnerable groups in transit sites and villages of origin, in total a population of some 606,000. Given the importance of access to life-saving basic services in promoting the achievement of durable solutions in the region and the relatively greater food security that increased access to cultivable land and lesser vulnerability to natural hazards, projects to be undertaken in Acholi have been tiered across the clusters/sectors by prioritising them in order of their response to the strategic objectives, where A corresponds to the first strategic objective, B to the second and C to the third.

Similarly, in Teso, the specific context and needs-based response has led to the identification of an estimated 60,160 individuals as a target population encompassing remaining IDPs, particularly EVIs, as well as vulnerable groups in return areas, including parts of the host community. Thus, projects prioritised as A again respond to the first strategic objective. However, given the specific vulnerability of the region to multiple natural hazards, projects prioritised as B on the three-tier system respond to the third strategic objective, while C projects respond to the second.

In Karamoja, where the successive years of drought and dependence on largely pastoralist livelihoods threatened by the ravages of animal disease have brought the majority of the population into a situation of acute food insecurity, projects that respond to the second strategic objective have been given the A priority, and those responding to the third the B priority, while those seeking to supplement basic services, while essential, have been given the C priority. This also reflects the importance of viewing the humanitarian response in Karamoja as a sub-set – albeit an urgent one – of the much greater need for sustained developmental commitment in the region.

Across the refugee-hosting districts of the West Nile region and other districts of western Uganda, the project prioritisation has been conducted on the same basis as in the Acholi region.

Region
Priority
Related Strategic Objective
Acholi
A
Strategic Objective 1 (Basic Services)
B
Strategic Objective 2 (Food and Nutritional Security and Livelihoods)
C
Strategic Objective 3 (Disaster Preparedness and Response)
Teso
A
Strategic Objective 1 (Basic Services)
B
Strategic Objective 3 (Disaster Preparedness and Response)
C
Strategic Objective 2 (Food and Nutritional Security and Livelihoods)
Karamoja
A
Strategic Objective 2 (Food and Nutritional Security and Livelihoods)
B
Strategic Objective 3 (Disaster Preparedness and Response)
C
Strategic Objective 1 (Basic Services)
West Nile
A
Strategic Objective 1 (Basic Services)
B
Strategic Objective 2 (Food and Nutritional Security and Livelihoods)
C
Strategic Objective 3 (Disaster Preparedness and Response)

Throughout the development of the 2009 appeal, the humanitarian community has continued the process, started at the 2008 mid-year review, of sharpening its focus to concentrate on those most urgent and life-saving actions, while trusting that the unambiguous need to consolidate the peace dividends accrued to date will be met by recovery and development counterparts operating under national leadership, whether at the level of central, district or local government. A definition of humanitarian action in Uganda in 2009 has been jointly developed and agreed, to facilitate this sharpening of focus.

On the basis of the above, therefore, the humanitarian community in Uganda is requesting a total of $225,288,099 to meet the most urgent humanitarian needs of approximately 1.6 million vulnerable individuals across the four regions of humanitarian operation in 2009.

Some basic facts about Uganda:


Most recent data
Previously
Population
29.6 million(UBOS 2007)
24.2 million (UBOS 2002)
Life expectancy
50.4 years(UBOS 2008)
46.4 years (UNFPA 1990)
Under-five mortality
137/1,000(UDHS 2006)
152/1000 (UDHS 2000/1)
Maternal mortality
435/100,000 (UDHS 2006)
505/100,000 (UDHS 2000/1)
Gross domestic product (GDP) per capita
$430(UBOS 2008)
$300 (UBOS 2003)
Population living on less than $1 per day
31%(UBOS 2007)
43% (UBOS 2000)
Proportion of population without sustainable
access to improved drinking water source
33%(UDHS 2006)
85% (UNFPA 1990)
Total number of IDPs
921,000*(UNHCR 2008)
1.8 million (UNHCR 2005)
Total number of Refugees in Uganda
146,400(UNHCR 2008)
220,000 (UNHCR 2007)
ECHO Vulnerability and Crisis Index score
3/3
Human Development Index ranking
154 of 177 (UNDP 2007/8)
150 of 173 (UNDP 2002)
* As of 30 September, there were approximately 562,000 IDPs remaining in camps across northern Uganda,
primarily in the Acholi sub-region, and a further 359,000 displaced persons living in transit sites. More than
1 million former IDPs have returned to their village of origin.
sites. More than 1 million former IDPs have returned to their village of origin.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Table I. Summary of Requirements - By Location

Table II. Summary of Requirements - By Sector/Cluster

Table III. Summary of Requirements - By Appealing Organisation

2. 2008 IN REVIEW

2.1 STRENGTHS / ACHIEVEMENTS BY CLUSTER/SECTOR

2.3 LESSONS LEARNED AND DONOR FUNDING TRENDS

3. THE 2009 COMMON HUMANITARIAN ACTION PLAN

3.1 THE CONTEXT

3.2 HUMANITARIAN CONSEQUENCES

3.3 SCENARIOS

3.3.1 Best Case Scenario (General)
3.3.2 Worst Case Scenario (General)
3.3.3 Most Likely Scenario
3.3.4 Humanitarian Consequences and Planning Figures

3.4 STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES FOR HUMANITARIAN RESPONSE IN 2009

3.4.1 Operational Approach

3.4.2 Roles and Competencies

3.5 CLUSTER/SECTOR RESPONSE PLANS BY REGION

3.5.1 Acholi sub-region
3.4.2 Teso sub-region
3.4.3 Karamoja region
3.5.4 West Nile and other Refugee-Hosting Districts

4. CRITERIA FOR SELECTION AND PRIORITISATION OF PROJECTS

4.1 CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF PROJECTS

4.2 CRITERIA FOR PRIORITISATION OF PROJECTS

5. MONITORING PLAN

6. DISTRICT PROFILES

ANNEX I. STRATEGIC MONITORING MATRIX FOR 2008

ANNEX II. ADAPTING THE CLUSTERS – IASC APPROVED GUIDANCE

ANNEX III. TABLE IV. LIST OF PROJECTS – (GROUPED BY SECTOR/CLUSTER)

ANNEX IV. TABLE V. LIST OF PROJECTS – (GROUPED BY APPEALING ORGANISATION)

ANNEX V. TABLE VI. SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS – BY IASC STANDARD SECTOR

ANNEX VI. DONOR RESPONSE TO 2008 APPEAL

ANNEX VII. ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

Please note that appeals are revised regularly. The latest version of this document is available on http://www.humanitarianappeal.net.

Full project details can be viewed, downloaded and printed from www.reliefweb.int/fts

Note: The full text of this appeal is available on-line in Adobe Acrobat (pdf) format and may also be downloaded in zipped MS Word format.

Volume 1 - Full Original Appeal [pdf* format] [zipped MS Word format]
* Get the Adobe Acrobat Viewer (free)

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