Uganda

Consolidated Appeals Process (CAP): Appeal 2008 for Uganda

Format
Appeal
Source
Posted
Originally published


1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

One and a half years on from the start of the peace negotiations between the Government of Uganda and the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), the humanitarian situation in northern Uganda continues to improve. By 30 September 2007, more than half of the 1.8 million northern Ugandans internally displaced at the start of 2005 had entered the return process, including half a million people who have completed the return and 400,000 who have made initial movements out of the camps.

In the Lango sub-region, where the bulk of the formerly displaced population who have returned to their villages of origin resides, the return process is expected to conclude by the end of 2007. In the Acholi sub-region, however, it is expected to continue past 2008, as movements out of the camps in Acholi have been slower due to several factors, including the longer duration of the conflict and camp life. The majority of Acholis who have left the camps have returned not to their villages of origin, but rather have settled in spontaneous transit sites from which they have better access to their own land for purposes of cultivation. In 2008, the expectation is that 35% of remaining internally displaced persons (IDPs) in the Acholi sub-region will complete the return, while 45% will be in transit and 20% will remain in camps.

This scenario underscores the need to ensure that an effective humanitarian response meets IDPs' needs at all points of the return. With the goal of ensuring a seamless transition to recovery, neither humanitarian donors nor response organisations can afford to cease their support until the IDPs have completed the return process, whether through progressive movements from an IDP camp to transit site(s) to village of origin or by opting to remain in their present locations as these locations are transformed into viable communities(1). Thus, the humanitarian community faces a threefold challenge to ensure that adequate basic services are provided through all the phases of displacement: in camps, transit sites and return areas.

The attendant risks if this triple mandate is not fulfilled have been highlighted all too sharply in 2007 in the Lango sub-region, where increased rates of malnutrition and mortality overtook a displaced population returning to areas of origin in which there was no or little access to basic services, such as health care and water and sanitation, and insufficient food. To redress this phenomenon, the humanitarian and human rights community has agreed to shift operations in northern Uganda away from site-specific delivery of humanitarian assistance, modelling the response instead on a community-based Parish Approach that prioritises rehabilitating existing infrastructure at locations accessible to the returning populations wherever they are.

In complement, the humanitarian community will look to the Government of Uganda and the development community to increase their presence and programmes throughout northern Uganda in order to promote the seamless transition from crisis to recovery. During the first quarter of 2008, open discussions will be held at the district level in order to establish a clear and transparent set of criteria to define the end state for humanitarian programming: a viable post-conflict community. It is also hoped that the Government of Uganda's Peace, Recovery and Development Plan (PRDP) for Northern Uganda, launched on 15 October 2007, will quickly be implemented, providing an overarching structure for recovery and development. However, given the lack of an established funding mechanism for development-oriented activities, some initial recovery projects have been included in the 2008 CAP. The humanitarian community will continue its close coordination with the Government as the PRDP is implemented.

While northern Uganda continues to improve, however, the situation in parts of north-eastern Uganda poses a serious challenge. Less than half of the 110,000 displaced persons living in camps in the Teso districts of Amuria and Katakwi are expected to return to their places of origin in 2008 due to insecurity associated with continued aggressive activities by illegally-armed Karimojong and lack of sufficient policing and protective deployments of Anti Stock Theft Units (ASTUs). Those remaining in camps or transit sites will require more and better humanitarian assistance in the year to come, including assistance to recover from the additional impact of the 2007 flooding, which was felt most severely by the displaced population in Teso.

Note:

(1) Indeed, a recent study in Gulu district suggests that a significant proportion of the displaced population may have no immediate intention to move "all the way home". Rather, for considerations related to enhanced security, proximity to basic services and acclimatisation to community life, many may choose to remain in transit sites – and even in the original camps – commuting the short distance to their villages of origin in order to carry out food production and income-generating activities (Waiting for Godot in Gulu, OCHA, 2007).

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Table I. Summary of Requirements – By Cluster

Table II. Summary of Requirements – By Appealing Organisation

2. 2007 IN REVIEW

2.1 Strengths/Achievements by Cluster

2.2 Constraints/Challenges by cluster

3. THE 2008 COMMON HUMANITARIAN ACTION PLAN

3.1 The Humanitarian Context and its Consequences

3.1.1 Context

3.1.2 Humanitarian Consequences

3.2 Scenarios

3.2.1 Best Case Scenario

3.2.2 Worst Case Scenario

3.2.3 Most Likely Scenario

3.3 Strategic Priorities for Humanitarian Response

3.3.1 Operational Approach

3.3.2 Roles and Competencies

3.4 Response Plans

3.4.1 CAMP COORDINATION AND CAMP MANAGEMENT

3.4.2 COORDINATION

3.4.3 EARLY RECOVERY (GOVERNANCE, INFRASTRUCTURE AND LIVELIHOODS)

3.4.4 EDUCATION

3.4.5 EMERGENCY NON-FOOD ITEMS

3.4.6 FOOD SECURITY

3.4.7 HEALTH, NUTRITION AND HIV/AIDS

3.4.8 MULTI-SECTOR REFUGEE PROGRAMME

3.4.9 PROTECTION

3.4.10 WATER, SANITATION AND HYGIENE (WASH)

4. STRATEGIC MONITORING PLAN

5. CRITERIA FOR SELECTION AND PRIORITISATION OF PROJECTS

6. SUMMARY: STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK FOR HUMANITARIAN RESPONSE

7. DISTRICT PROFILES

Table III. List of Projects - By Cluster

Table IV. List of Projects - By Appealing Organisation

Table V. Summary of Requirements - By Sector

ANNEX I. DONOR RESPONSE TO 2007 APPEAL

ANNEX II. ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

Please note that appeals are revised regularly. The latest version of this document is available on http://www.humanitarianappeal.net

PROJECT SUMMARY SHEETS ARE IN A SEPARATE VOLUME ENTITLED "PROJECTS"

Note: The full text of this appeal is available on-line in Adobe Acrobat (pdf) format and may also be downloaded in zipped MS Word format.

Volume 1 - Full Original Appeal [pdf* format] [zipped MS Word format]
Volume 2 - Projects [pdf* format] [zipped MS Word format]

* Get the Adobe Acrobat Viewer (free)

For additional copies, please contact:

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Palais des Nations
8-14 Avenue de la Paix
CH - 1211 Geneva, Switzerland

Tel.: (41 22) 917.1972
Fax: (41 22) 917.0368
E-Mail: cap@reliefweb.int

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit https://www.unocha.org/.