(3RP) Regional Refugee and Resilience Plan in response to the Syria Crisis | 2018 Annual Report [EN/AR]

Report
from UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Published on 25 Mar 2019 View Original
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HIGHLIGHTS ACROSS THE REGION

BRIDGE. OUTSOURCE. TRANSFORM – IMPACT SOURCING PLATFORM FOR YOUTH

UNICEF and Digital Oppurtunity Trust (DOT) Lebanon developed an impact sourcing platform - Bridge. Outsource. Transform. (“B.O.T.”) - to tackle high youth unemployment in Lebanon. B.O.T. matches marginalized youth in Lebanon, who have been trained with digital skills through UNICEF’s Generation of Innovation Leaders (GIL) program, with online income-generatingopportunities. During its pilot phase, 125 young adults earned approximately USD 60,000 on the platform. In addition, B.O.T. won the recent Global Social Venture Competition in the region in partnership with BeryTech (Business Innovation & Incubation Center in Lebanon for Entrepreneurs). It will now participate in the next stage, a Global Round competing against social startups from all around the world.

ILO’S WORKPLACE ADAPTATION TRAINING

The International Labour Organization (ILO) implemented a “Workplace Adaptation Training” programme to support the integration of Syrian refugees into host communities and for Turkish national workers to become more understanding and accepting of Syrian refugees and their situation. Some 150 beneficiaries in 16 workplaces have so far benefitted from the programme. Challenges related to work permits and language barriers are constantly cited as the key obstacles to access to employment for refugees, and this programme also seeks to address these issues.

MEETING FOR A RENEWED RESILIENCE COMMITMENT

A ‘Meeting for a Renewed Resilience Commitment’ was held in April in Amman prior to the Brussels II Conference.
Participants re-affirmed their commitment to stronger and effective resilience-based programming in supporting affected individuals, communities and institutions. Participants included Government representatives from Lebanon and Jordan, members of diplomatic missions, UN Agencies, NGOs and CSO’s and think tanks.

BLOCKCHAIN IN JORDAN

Based on the success of the Building Blocks pilot project launched in 2017, WFP-Jordan has expanded the use of blockchain technology to deliver humanitarian assistance to 110,000 Syrian refugees in Azraq and Zaatari refugee camps, enhancing the delivery of cash-based transfers (CBT). By the end of the year, a total of USD 39 million was transferred to beneficiaries using Blockchain. This technology has enabled WFP to provide CBT assistance in a more efficient and less costly manner. In 2019, WFP is planning to expand the use of Building Blocks to reach Syrian refugees in host communities.

SOCIAL INNOVATION LABS

In 2018, UNICEF Jordan scaled-up its social innovation labs programme, expanding its reach from 30,000 to 90,000 young people through the establishment of an additional 43 physical labs in Makani centres. At the labs, UNICEF’s “UPSHIFT” curriculum is implemented, which aims to help young identify the biggest challenges they are facing in their communities and coming up with innovative ventures to address these challenges. The labs also serve as a positive learning environment for unstructured activities, and some labs offer technical training in robotics, creative media, and coding

AN INNOVATIVE RESPONSE BOOSTING RESILIENCE IN TURKEY’S HEALTH SECTOR

The Ministry of Health of Turkey (MoH), supported by WHO, the European Union, health sector partners and other humanitarian actors, has led a country-wide response aimed at strengthening refugee-sensitive health service delivery. The programme aims to provide linguistic- and culturally-sensitive primary healthcare services for the Syrian population. The programme has established a network of Migrant Health Centres (MHCs) across the country where Syrian doctors and nurses offer health services to other fellow Syrians.
Within this scheme, WHO and MoH began to train Syrian doctors and nurses to serve in the Turkish health care system across the network of MHCs. The training programme, aimed at teaching Syrian health care workers how to navigate the system, consists of a one-week theoretical training and a six-week on-the-job training. During the practical stage, Syrian health care workers are guided and supervised by Turkish health care workers while providing health care services in seven Refugee Health Training Centres across the country.
In 2018, over 580,000 primary health care consultations were provided in the seven Refugee Health Training Centres, relating to immunization, maternal care and child health care. Some 234 Syrian doctors, 308 Syrian nurses and 629 interpreters/ patient guides were trained; and, some 1,357 Syrian health professionals are currently employed by Ministry of Health and serving in Migration Health Centres across the country.

STRENGTHENING NATIONAL LEADERSHIP AS THE RESPONSE EVOLVES IN IRAQ

As the response continues to evolve in Iraq, from an emergency to a longer-term solutions and development approach, a number of measures have been taken to gradually shift the response from 3RP partner-led activities to government-led activities, supported by 3RP partners. In 2018, this includes capacity building and partnership between UNHCR and government entities, such as child protection training for Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs (MoLSA)/ Directorates of Social Affairs (DoSA) staff, and Gender Based Violence (GBV) prevention and response training for staff of the General Directorate of combating violence against women (DCVAW).
Going forward, this transition will also see existing refugee camps transform into viable settlements, and the gradual inclusion of Syrian refugees into the existing national systems and services.

PERCEPTIONS OF SOCIAL TENSIONS IN LEBANON

In 2018, the Social Stability sector in Lebanon generated a tool that allowed the results of the UNDP/ARK Group perception surveys on social tensions to be shared with partners in an easily accessible way. The platform is designed to offer quantitative data on host community-refugee relations in a tailored format for humanitarian and development practitioners and decision-makers. It presents data from all four iterations of data collection and includes maps so that Information regarding specific sectors is easily accessible. The dashboard is accessible though the following link: http://tiny. cc/nvh9vy.