Syria

UNICEF Whole of Syria - Northwest Syria Situation Report No. 2 (1 - 26 February 2020)

Format
Situation Report
Source
Posted
Originally published

Attachments

Highlights

• The humanitarian crisis for people in northwest Syria continues to reach new and dire levels. 948,000 people have been displaced since 1st December 2019, exceeding previous worst case planning figures by the humanitarian community. Of these, some 569,000 are children and over 195,000 are women, together comprising 81 percent of the newly displaced population.

• Indiscriminate attacks in civilian areas continue to drive people from their homes and destroy vital services, including hospitals, markets, and schools. In the last week, in Idlib, 10 schools and kindergartens have come under attack, killing at least 9 children and 3 teachers.

• Considering the scale of this dire humanitarian situation, humanitarian actors on the ground continue to leverage all efforts to scale up. However, people’s needs are so vast, that with the current resources it is a struggle to meet their needs, which grow exponentially despite all humanitarian efforts.

• UNICEF and partners are scaling up their response to meet the needs of 800,000 internally displaced people in northwest Syria. The scale up plan is US$ 36 million with US$ 18.8 million as a gap considering funding received from CERF.

Situation Overview & Humanitarian Needs

Renewed military operations and an escalation of hostilities continued in southern and eastern Idlib and Western Aleppo.

Government of Syria (GoS) and allies continued to advance in the past days in eastern and southern Idlib and northern Hama, with 30 communities and villages coming under its control. Military action has been associated with high number of civilian casualties.

In the last week, in Idlib, 10 schools and kindergartens have come under attack, killing at least 9 children and 3 teachers.

Attacks have also been reported on one health centre, two collective centres, a city council building and a bakery. The hospital and city council building in Idlib city and the hospital in Ma’arrat Tamasrin were reportedly put out of service due to the severity of material damage.

According to OHCHR monitoring at least 108 civilians including 19 women and 36 children were reportedly killed as a result of what were reported to be airstrikes and ground-based strikes by pro-government forces between 1-20 February.

Turkey deployed a reported 7,000 troops into Idlib and established additional four observation points in rural southern Idlib. So far, the total number of Turkish observation points in Idlib and Aleppo reached 43.

The humanitarian crisis for people in northwest Syria continues to reach dire levels. 948,000 people have been displaced since 1st December 2019, exceeding worst case planning figures by the humanitarian community. Of these, some 569,000 are children and over 195,000 are women, together comprising 81 percent of the newly displaced population.

Most people moved within Idlib governorate; with Dana sub-district hosting the largest population of the newly displaced people, followed by Ma’aret Tamsrin, Salqin and Idlib city. Tens of thousands of others moved to areas in northern Aleppo governorate, mainly Afrin, A’zaz, Jandairis and Al Bab.

Over 380,000 of the total displaced fled to areas in northern Aleppo governorate such as Afrin, A’zaz and Al Bab. Some 17,000 people are still living under trees and in open spaces, representing 1.5 per cent of the recently displaced population. 21 per cent live in formal camps (some 196,000 people), 9 per cent are in collective centres (some 82,000 people) and 14 per cent in individual tents (some 135,000 people), while 36 per cent live with host families or in rented houses (some 343,000 people) and 17 per cent – some 163,000 people – are in unfinished houses or buildings.

Indiscriminate attacks in civilian areas continue to drive people from their homes and destroy vital services, including hospitals, markets, and schools. Cold weather has made the situation worse for people exposed in harsh conditions.
The frontlines in northwest Syria are rapidly moving closer to densely populated areas, with bombardments increasingly affecting IDP sites and the areas around them.

Despite the deteriorating situation on the ground, humanitarian agencies continue to leverage all efforts to scale up.
However, current resources and capacities are unable to meet the exponentially growing needs of internally displaced and host community populations.