Sudan

USCR Sudan - News Update 30 Mar 2000

Format
News and Press Release
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Posted
Originally published
BOMBING OF CIVILIAN TARGETS ACCELERATES IN SOUTHERN SUDAN
The bombing of hospitals, schools, relief centers and other civilian targets in southern Sudan by the Khartoum government has dramatically expanded in the last eight weeks.

Recent bombings include:

  • Comboni Primary School (Kauda, February 7th, fourteen children killed, eighteen injured)
  • Samaritan's Purse's hospital (Lui, March 1st, two killed)
  • Concern Worldwide's relief center (Yirol, March 6th)
  • Samaritan's Purse's hospital (Lui, March 7th)
  • Voice of the Martyrs' hospital (March 14th, one killed, one injured)
  • Diocese of Torit hospital (Nimule, March 14th, one killed, seven injured)
  • Samaritan's Purse hospital (Lui, March 23rd, six injured)
  • Displaced persons camp (Kotobi, March 24th)
  • ZOA Refugee Care hospital (Tali, March 25th, one killed)
In addition, uncounted villages, markets, and displaced persons centers have also been bombed.

These bombings continue in clear violation of the Geneva Conventions and all international norms with respect to the treatment of civilians caught up in war situations.

THOUSANDS OF NEW REFUGEES FLEEING SOUTHERN SUDAN

The rate of refugees fleeing Sudan has significantly increased in the first months of 2000. More than 400 a week are reaching Lokichokio, Kenya. As many as 900 have arrived in Uganda in early March. More than 5,500 have arrived in Ethiopia this year. UNHCR sites government air raids, factional fighting and general lawlessness as the causes of this increased refugee flows.

UNHCR registered over 50,000 newly arrived refugees from Sudan in 1999. The majority fled to neighboring Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, and Chad.

CANADIAN OIL DEVELOPMENT CONTINUES IN SUDAN

Fosters Resources Ltd. announced March 12th that its affiliate Melut Petroleum Co., Ltd. has acquired a concession to explore a new oil project in the Upper Nile region of Sudan and will spend $30 million over three years in the development phase.

In 1999 aid workers witnessed first hand the death and destruction wrought against civilians so that the Sudanese government could enter into the agreement with Fosters. More than 30,000 people in the region were forced to flee their homes due to fighting. Hundreds more were killed or severely injured.

While the Canadian government has moved forward with the implementation of sanctions against countries whose corporations continue to participate in the diamond trade in Angola, they have failed to pursue similar sanctions against those that continue to be active in oil production in Sudan. This failure to take action persists even though human rights abuses continue to be documented in the regions where oil development occurs. Moreover, the revenues that go to the Sudanese government from oil are still being used to purchase weapons and equipment that are used against the civilian population of Southern Sudan.

STATE OF EMERGENCY EXTENDED

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir extended the state of emergency, first implemented December 12, 1999, through the end of 2000.