UNICEF Sudan Humanitarian Situation Report, December 2017

Report
from UN Children's Fund
Published on 31 Dec 2017

Highlights

  • In addition to the response to the protracted humanitarian situation, caused by armed conflict, floods and epidemics, UNICEF responded in 2017 mainly to three new emergencies related to the high rates of malnutrition in newly accessible areas, the Acute Watery Diarrhoea outbreak and the high influx of South Sudanese refugees. Also, the year marked a huge step forward in protecting children from violations in armed conflict by implementing the Action Plan signed between UN and the government.

  • In some of the newly accessible areas of Jebel Marra in Central Darfur, UNICEF led an integrated response namely a ‘Find & Treat’ campaign with four rounds to deliver a package of life-saving services. During the campaign, 183,346 children were screened and 3,619 children were identified as suffering from Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM).
    All identified malnourished children were admitted for treatment.

  • Together with the Federal and State Ministries of Health, WHO and other partners,
    UNICEF deployed integrated interventions. UNICEF supported 309 oral rehydration treatment corners (ORTCs) in total that served around 46,350 people to date, as well as WASH interventions that reached two million people (including around one million children) on monthly average across all states of Sudan.

Situation in Numbers

2,300,000 children in need
4,800,000 people
# of people who need Humanitarian Assistance (Source: Sudan Humanitarian Needs Overview 2017)

1,100,000 children
2,300,000 people
# of internally displaced people (Source: Sudan Humanitarian Needs Overview 2017)

126,987 children
192,404 people
# of South Sudanese refugees since January 2017 (Source: ’Sudan: Refugees from South Sudan as of 15 December 2017’ reported by UNHCR. Around 66% of South Sudanese refugees are children)

Situation Overview and Humanitarian Needs

In addition to the protracted humanitarian situation, caused by armed conflict, floods and epidemics, UNICEF responded in 2017 mainly to three new emergencies related to the high rates of malnutrition in newly accessible areas, the Acute Watery Diarrhoea (AWD) outbreak and the high influx of South Sudanese refugees.

Malnutrition in newly accessible areas This year, due to the improvement of the security situation in the Darfur, South and West Kordofan and Blue Nile states, humanitarian organizations were able to reach conflict affected people with dire needs in previously inaccessible areas.

In some of the newly accessible areas of Jebel Marra in Central Darfur, immediate interventions including Child Protection, Education, Health, Nutrition, Food security as well as Water, Sanitation and Hygiene services were required for approximately 200,000 displaced or newly returned people, including an estimated 120,000 children due to the assessments conducted in March. Inter-agency assessments at other newly accessible areas in East Jebel Marra locality (South Darfur) and Blue Nile states continue discovering more people with dire needs.

Acute Watery Diarrhoea An outbreak of Acute Watery Diarrhoea (AWD) that started in August 2016, re-surged throughout 2017 with over 36,000 suspected cases and an average of 30 fatalities per week during the peak at end of June across 143 localities in all 18 states of Sudan. AWD cases in the hardest hit White Nile State reached 8,824 cases, while the cases are contained more than 9 weeks. White Nile states has a low coverage with improved water sources i.e. 33 per cent and sanitation facilities i.e. 39 per cent which consider as some of the main catalysts of AWD outbreak. The overall number of AWD weekly cases remains low since October, yet new suspected cases were observed in Red Sea State during December.

Influx of South Sudanese refugees From January to mid-December 2017, 192,404 South Sudanese refugees arrived in Sudan, including approximately 126,987 children (66 per cent). It is estimated that there are a total of 795,353 South Sudanese refugees in Sudan. UNICEF has been supporting South Sudanese refugees, especially women and children, in camps and also in out-of-camp settlements mainly in White Nile, East Darfur, South Darfur, West Kordofan and South Kordofan states which host the vast majority of the refugees. Important needs for child protection, education, health, nutrition, and WASH services are recognized in out-of-camp refugee settlements that host 79 per cent of the South Sudanese refugee population in Sudan.

In East Darfur, an interagency assessment in out-of-camp settlement areas of South Sudanese refugees conducted through end of September to beginning of October, identified only 93 refugee children (40 girls and 53 boys) enrolled in schools in the urban settlements in Adilla and Abukarinka where approximately 1o,000 refugee school age children are estimated to exist in the assessed four localities6 . In addition, more than 3,000 South Sudanese children have been identified and documented as separated and unaccompanied children during 2017. The conflicts in South Sudan result in large numbers of children separated from their families and caregivers.