Sudan + 1 more

Appeal for Sudanese Refugees Resettlement

Format
Appeal
Source
Posted
Originally published


Adjumani, Uganda
Sudanese Refugees Resettlement - AFUG 81
Appeal Target : US$ 361,000

Geneva, April 27, 1998

Dear Friends,

The protracted civil war in Sudan has, since 1983, resulted in major influxes of refugees fleeing to neighbouring countries and, since mid-1986, there have been significant population displacements across the border into Uganda.

Initially, transit camps were set up to deal with the regular onslaught of displaced persons and, since 1989, local settlements of refugees have been developed allowing the refugees to become more independent and self sufficient.

As of end 1997, Adjumani, Uganda has a caseload of 68,599 displaced persons, with some 51,000 of these in the process of becoming established in local settlements. Food relief is no longer provided to four settlements where the refugees have become self sufficient, whilst in some camps the relief has been greatly reduced. But, all the remaining transit camps and the majority of settlements continue to be partly or fully dependent on food relief. Furthermore new refugee settlements are being developed in an area to the south of Adjumani, where communication and social infrastructure is very poor or non-existent.

Lutheran World Federation/World Service (LWF/WS) working as UNHCR’s main partner, aims to provide refugee assistance in 4 transit camps and 25 local settlements. LWF/WS strives to meet the basic refugee needs of food, water, shelter and protection, aid the transition of those still in transit camps to local settlements and ensure that all refugee households have access to cultivatable land to help in their becoming self reliant and develop basic infrastructual and social facilities such as health, schooling, roads/bridges etc.

ACT assistance is being requested to meet the basic life sustaining needs of those who have not yet attained food self sufficiency and self reliance in the Adjumani district and who, because of the continuing conflict in the Sudan cannot return to their pre-emergency lives.

We thank you in advance for your support. Please kindly send your contributions to the ACT bank account.

For further information, please contact:

ACT Co-ordinator, Miriam Lutz (phone 41 22 791 6032 or mobile phone ++ 41 89 203 6055)
or
ACT Appeals Officer, Dirk Van Gorp (phone +41 22 791 6040)

ACT Web Site address: http://www.wcc-coe.org/act/

Rev. Myra Blyth
Director
WCC/Unit IV
LWF/World Service
Miriam Lutz
ACT Co-ordinator
Rev. Rudolf Hinz
Director
I. REQUESTING ACT MEMBER INFORMATION

A. Lutheran World Federation, Uganda Programme, PO Box 5827, Kampala Uganda.
Tel. (256-41)267297 Fax (256-41)267872
E-mail lwf-uganda@maf.org

B. LWF/WS Uganda has been engaged in relief, rehabilitation and development projects in Uganda since 1979. Emergency relief programmes undertaken have included famine relief in Karamoja, returnee resettlement in West Nile, displaced population assistance in the Luwero triangle, Zairean refugee assistance and cross border assistance into Rwanda, Zaire and Sudan.

II. IMPLEMENTING ACT MEMBER And PARTNER INFORMATION

LWF/WS Uganda, as above

III. DESCRIPTION Of The EMERGENCY SITUATION

Type of emergency - Human made
The protracted Sudanese Peoples Liberation Army - Government of Sudan civil war has resulted in major population displacements since 1983 and refugees fleeing across the border into northern Uganda from mid 1986 onwards. Major influxes were received into Moyo and Gulu districts in 1989, 1991 and again in 1994. The first of 3 adjacent transit camps was opened by UNHCR in Ogujebe on the east bank of the Albert Nile in 1986, on land provided by the Government of Uganda. In mid 1994 a fourth smaller transit camp was opened primarily for Dinka refugees some 30 km away near Adjumani town. Local settlement of refugees was begun in mid 1989 when the first of 25 relatively small settlements was developed in Adjumani district. A further local settlement began to be developed across the Nile in Moyo district in 1995. As of 31 December 1997 the total Sudanese refugee population in Adjumani district was 68,599, with a further 22,000 in the process of being resettled in Moyo district.

Current Situation - Post Crisis Phase
Of the present refugee caseload of 68,599 in Adjumani district, some 51,000 are now in the process of becoming established in local settlements and the transit camp’s populations had been reduced to less that 17,600 by 31 December 1997, with a further 114 unaccompanied minors in institutional care.

Food relief is no longer being provided in four settlements (pop. 1,974) where refugees have reached food self-sufficiency, cereal rations have been reduced to 50% in 8 settlements (pop. 8,090) whilst cereal rations have been cut by 20% in a further 3 settlements (pop. 5,958). Refugees in the more recent 10 settlements (pop 34,887) being developed together with the 17,690 refugees in transit camps and unaccompanied minor centers still require full food rations for survival.

Date of emergency - 1 January - 31 December 1998
It is extremely unlikely that the conditions of civil war and instability in south Sudan will improve in the short term. Furthermore, given the ethnic composition of the vast majority of Sudanese refugees in Adjumani districts, it is most unlikely that they will voluntarily repatriate to their home areas in the short term, even if the SPLA gain firm control of them.

Location of emergency - Adjumani district (formerly East Moyo county, Moyo district) close to the Sudanese border in north-west Uganda. Refugees are located in 4 transit camps, and 25 local settlements scattered throughout the district. The district covers an area of some 3,300 sq. km with an estimated national population of some 85,500; the majority of whom were themselves refugees in South Sudan from 1980 - 86. The area suffered major infrastructual damage and decay in the post-Amin period, which has not yet been fully rehabilitated. The majority of the population is rural and primarily dependent on subsistence agriculture. Soil is moderately fertile with rainfall slightly above 1,000 mm in a bimodal pattern, two crops per annum can be produced. Adjumani town (pop. circa 2,500) is approx. 450km by road from Kampala but only accessible under military escort from Gulu. There are regular charter flights between Adjumani and Entebbe.

Impact On Human Lives
All refugees in transit camps and the majority in local settlements are dependent on relief agencies for food, water, health and education services. Almost 11,000 of the 25,500 transferred to local settlements pre 1996 have insufficient cultivatable land to become food self-sufficient (many are little better off than they were in transit where no cultivatable land is available). The remaining 40,000 in local settlements should achieve food self-sufficiency within the next two years, while further settlements are being developed for the approx. 14,000 refugees remaining in the main transit camps together with 11,000 in unviable old settlements. This will still leave approximately 3,700, primarily Dinka refugees in transit as both the national population and local government authorities are unwilling to provide settlement land for them.

Description of Damages
New refugee settlements are primarily being developed in the now relatively sparsely inhabited south of the district, where communication and social infrastructure was either poorly developed or destroyed in the immediate post Amin period. As there is little that can be rehabilitated, resettlement calls for new basic infrastructure such as roads, bridges, schools, water supplies, health facilities, etc. to be constructed and maintained by the programme. New homes, latrines, etc. have to be constructed by the refugees themselves being transferred to settlements.

Locations For ACT Appeal Response - Adjumani district
LWF/WS is involved in providing refugee assistance in all 4 transit camps and 25 local settlements in the district. As UNHCR’s main partner, LWF is responsible for multi-sectoral assistance including food distribution, transport and logistics (including central mechanical workshop operation) non-food item management, transit camp water operation and maintenance, settlement planning and development (including land demarcation, refugee transfer and settlement, roads/bridges and health facility construction), aspects of social services provision, refugee registration and general camp management. No less than five other international NGOs - ACORD, ACF, AHA, AEF and JRS are, under agreements with UNHCR, involved in the provision of agriculture/forestry, water development, health/sanitation and education assistance to refugees in the district. Food is being provided by World Food Programme to extended delivery points managed by LWF.

Disaster and Emergency Statistics
LWF is responsible for refugee registration and recording population movements, and updated population and demographic data is provided on a monthly basis to UNHCR, government and partners organizations. There is no disagreement on figures. The last registration exercise was undertaken by UNHCR in collaboration with Government and LWF in October 1997.

Current Security Situation
The district including local national and refugee settlements is subject to intermittent insecurity primarily caused by Lords Resistance Army rebels infiltrating from adjoining Gulu district. UNRF II and West Nile Bank Front rebels also occasionally cause insecurity incidents. All project supplies en route to Adjumani have to travel through war torn Gulu district under infrequent military escorts. LWF/WS staff coordinate closely with the Ugandan police and army and are in constant radio contact with them and all other partner organizations. Seven project trucks and several light vehicles were destroyed by LRA rebels who attacked the LWF/UNHCR compound in October 1996. The area is currently under UN security phase III having been reduced from phase IV in mid 1997.

IV. ACT APPEAL GOAL And OBJECTIVES

A. The project goal is to preserve, sustain and rehabilitate life and reduce the suffering of refugees, particularly vulnerable refugees, in Adjumani district whilst concurrently enabling them to become food self-sufficient and self-reliant in harmonious relations with the host community.

B. Project Objectives

to continue to meet the basic needs (foods, water, shelter, protection) of all refugees still in transit and all new refugee arrivals,

to transfer and resettle the remaining 14,000 in the main transit camps and retransfer approx. 11,000 from unviable old settlements to productive settlements.

to ensure that all refugee households in settlements have secure access to adequate cultivatable land to achieve and go beyond food self-sufficiency,

to ensure all resettling refugees basic food needs are met through a combination of their own increasing production and decreasing relief food distributions,

to develop basic infrastructural facilities such as health facilities, roads/bridges, etc., to jointly serve resettling refugees and the impacted national population,

to ensure that all 54 light vehicles, 25 trucks, 60 motorcycles, 16 generators, boat engines, and heavy roads equipment utilised by LWF, UNHCR, Ministry of Local Government and partner NGOs under the project are effectively and efficiently maintained and repaired and that all UNHCR bulk provided fuel is properly managed and accounted for.

to promote increased integration of service provision for refugees and nationals through capacity building of specific government departments and Local Councils.

to promote the support of children at risk, unaccompanied minors, disabled and other vulnerable refugees by their respective communities and meet the specific needs of these particularly vulnerable refugees.

to promote active refugee, and where feasible national community, participation in all project activities thereby contributing to longer term self-reliance,

V. ACT APPEAL BENEFICIARIES

Number & Type Of Your Targeted Beneficiaries

As of 1 January 1998 the total refugee population in Adjumani district was 68,599. Of these 17,576 were in four transit camps, 114 unaccompanied minors were institutionalized in 3 unaccompanied minors centers (orphanages) and 50,909 were in 25 settlements scattered throughout the district. Of the latter some 16,500 were less than one year in settlement whilst only 1,974 had reached full food self-sufficiency. While about 40,000 of these presently in settlements should be able to achieve food self-sufficiency within the next 2 years, approx. 11,000 will have to be resettled in new settlements as the quantity/quality of land they have been allocated previously is insufficient.

Almost 550 refugees are either physically or mentally disabled of whom 310 have either lost limbs or the use of them. Some 1,637 refugees are elderly living alone, as couples or with children under 18 years. Over 40% of families are female headed.

The number of institutionalized unaccompanied minors has been reduced recently with the placement of 26 with suitable foster families and the phasing out of a further 92 who had reached the age of 18 from institutional care.

All 68,599 Sudanese refugees presently in the district together with all new arrivals (estimated 1,000 - 3,000) during 1998 are targeted for general assistance. Unaccompanied minors, foster families, recently phased out unaccompanied minors, the disabled, the chronically ill, elderly living alone or with young children and particularly vulnerable female headed houses are targeted for specific assistance.

The majority of refugees currently remaining in transit have been there for at least 5 years. The average family size in the transit camps is 2.64 but this may be significantly increased through intensive encouragement of family reunions (of the 21,642 refugees transferred from transits to settlements in 1997 the average family size was increased to 4.87). The majority of the refugees have an agricultural background with some being cattle herders and fishermen. A significant number of families have a few chickens, some have goats but very few have cattle. A significant number are from town areas and amongst these are traders and professionals in the medical, educational and technical fields. Ethnically, although 28 groups are represented, 44.6% are Madi, 32.8% are Kuku, 9.0% are Acholi, 5.0% are Dinka whilst the remaining 8% is composed of 24 tribal groups. The district’s national population is almost exclusively Madi.

Demographically, 50.7% of the refugee population is male and the percentage of females only slightly exceeds males in the 18 years and over category. Approximately 20% of the population is under 5, 32% is aged 6-17 years and 47% is above 18.

Criteria used in selecting beneficiaries:

All refugees will continue to be provided general assistance (food, water, settlement infrastructure development, etc.) under the programme. Those targeted for specific assistance are selected according to their specific needs in line with UNHCR guidelines.

Number of Targeted Beneficiaries According To Proposed Assistance

66,600 will continue to be provided monthly food rations with rates adjusted in accordance with periodic assessments of their own food-production.

14,000 in transit will continue to be provided a minimum of 20 ltrs of potable water per person/day (until they are transferred to new settlements).

25,000 will be provided adequate settlement land (0.3 ha per person) and a settlement kit per family (based on family size).

Various infrastructure (roads, bridges, health facilities etc.) will be constructed/rehabilitated to meet the needs of the 25,000 being resettled/re-resettled in 1998 along with the 16,500 resettled in 1997.

All disabled, unaccompanied minors, elderly living alone, in couples or with children under 10 years (pop 2,050) will be provided 5g salt and 20 grams sugar per person/day for he year. Sugar (5.2mton) and salt (0.57mton) will also be provided to Africa Humanitarian Action who are responsible for supplementary and therapeutic feeding.

4,850 vulnerable (disabled, unaccompanied minors, elderly with children, vulnerable female headed households) will be provided one bar of soap each per month during the year.

2,500 particularly vulnerable refugees will each be provided one set of used clothing.

20 particularly needy families lacking their own labour will be assisted to construct basic huts with community support.

Approximately 200-250 physically disabled refugees will be provided items such as crutches, glasses, calipers, chairs wheelchair repair etc.

Scholastic materials, tools, basic raw materials, and training as appropriate, will be provided to phasing-out-unaccompanied minors, disabled and other vulnerable whilst approximately 35 foster families will be provided limited material support as inducement/reward for looking after orphans.

Training of refugee welfare committees and local council representatives should improve service delivery for all 68,600 refugees and the 85,500 nationals in the district.

VI. PROPOSED EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE And IMPLEMENTATION

A. Senior Programme Personnel : Life preserving, life sustaining

While food is provided by WFP and funds have been made available from UNHCR for implementation of most of the general refugee assistance required, LWF/WS is responsible through its Field Coordinator and small team of specialised supervisory and support staff for ensuring that all primarily life sustaining assistance (food water, shelter, infrastructure etc.) is properly planned, managed and implemented. The most critical requirement therefore, is funds to pay salaries and related costs of the senior personnel required for implementing the programme.

B. Houses to be repaired or reconstructed: Life preserving.

The vast majority of refuges ie. new arrivals and those on transfers to settlements, are able to construct their own houses from local materials; bush poles, sun dried bricks and thatch. However, especially vulnerable refugees (disabled, elderly and infirm living alone or with minors) require material and labour assistance in this area. It is planned to assist up to 20 such families to construct their houses through community support.

C. Food and/or nutritional assistance - Life preserving

Although WFP is providing food for general distribution to refugees, sugar and salt has not been available for months and is most unlikely to be provided by them in the foreseeable future. Sugar and salt (20g and 5g respectively per person per day) is required during the year for approx. 2,050 vulnerable refugees (disabled, unaccompanied minor, elderly alone) whilst an additional 5.2 m tons sugar and 0.6m ton salt is required for therapeutic and supplementary feeding.

D. Bedding and clothing - Life sustaining

Approx. 2,500 sets of second hand clothing are required for unaccompanied minors, disabled/chronically ill and the elderly living alone or with minors.

E. Soap - Life sustaining

Although soap should be available from UNHCR for general distribution, in practice refugees have only been provided 3 pcs of soap each over the last 2 years. It is therefore planned to provide one piece of soap per month over the year to the disabled, unaccompanied minors, elderly with minors, and vulnerable female headed houses; a total population of some 4,850.

F. Medical and related assistance - life rehabilitating

A recent detailed refugee survey undertaken by LWF revealed a total of some 550 disabled/chronically ill refugees in Adjumani district. These included people who have lost arms and/or legs, have suffered partial paralysis (eg. through polio), have impaired hearing or sight and lepers. Although a number have wheelchairs many of these need repairs (eg. welding, tires etc.), while other refugees are in need of crutches, calipers, spectacles, etc. or such a basic items as a simple chair.

G. Social/Community Services Support - life rehabilitating :

A number of unaccompanied/potentially unaccompanied minors have been and will continue to be fostered out to relatives/neighbours/clan families as they preferred alternatives to institutional care. Small incentives (eg. clothing, additional food, etc) are required in support of such families. Protection cases also need to be supported while their case is being processed. Institutionalized unaccompanied minors have to leave their institution to join the general refugee population when they reach the age of 18 years. At this stage they need support to continue schooling (eg scholastic materials) or to start-up productive activities. Start up materials and training is also required by the disabled to undertake productive activities (eg. tools, raw materials, training). Refugee welfare committees members require training to become more active in managing their respective settlements.

H. Service Integration/Capacity Building - life rehabilitating

Both refugee welfare committee members and local level elected national leaders need training together in areas such as infrastructure maintenance (schools, roads, water facilities etc.), child rights, national laws, etc. This joint approach will also promote greater integration between refugees and the host national population.

The new Adjumani district administration’s capacity and that of its four sub-county offices needs to be built up also to better enable them to plan and provide services for both nationals and resettling refugee. This will involve provision of basic furniture and office equipment, training on planning and budgeting, and assistance in undertaking surveys (including detailed administrative mapping down to the village level).

VII. DESCRIPTION OF IMPLEMENTATION METHODOLOGY

A. Personnel Required: A total of 226 full time staff are required to plan, supervise, implement and monitor the local settlement programme for Sudanese refugees in Adjumani district during 1998. Of these some 219 are paid directly out of funds received by LWF from UNHCR and WFP. This appeal covers the salaries of the following full-time staff who are not covered under UNHCR and/or WFP funds; one Field Coordinator, (12 months) one Mechanical Workshop Manager (12 months), one Construction Manager (7 months), one Settlement Officer (10 months), one Assistant Social Services Coordinator (12 months), one Monitoring/Reporting Officer (12 month at 50%) and one Driver (12 months). An additional 14 LWF/DWS staff in Kampala are involved in providing logistics, programme and budget/finance support to the refugee settlement programme.

B. Project Administration and Support requirements: At field level the programme is administered from the LWF Pakelle compound consisting of offices, mechanical workshop, carpentry workshop, warehouses, containers, fuel station, etc. A smaller office in Kampala provides administrative support. Some 8 light vehicles, 19 trucks, one tractor, 6 motorcycles and various pieces of heavy roads equipment currently enables LWF/WS to provide services to refugees. To improve the refugee data base and improve mechanical warehouse inventory control two new computers, printers and UPSs needs to be purchased whilst a recently donated HF radio-E-mail system needs to be licensed and installed to improve communications between the programme and LWF Kampala. Stationery, and reference materials for training, also need to be purchased.

C. Transportation Requirements: Eight new 125cc motorcycles with helmets need to be purchased for field staff involved in the provision of social services/community development. As the Gulu-Pakelle road is quite insecure, charter flights need to be used regularly for personnel and urgent cargo transportation between Entebbe and Adjumani. Approx. 40 m ton materials under this appeal needs to be transported from Kampala to Pakelle by hired trucks.

D. Procurement: Whilst most project materials and equipment required can be purchased locally at reasonable prices, motorcycles and computers with accessories will be purchased overseas and airfreighted to Entebbe to save costs. All procurement will be undertaken within the ACT procurement guidelines.

E. Provision and implementation of assistance: LWF is responsible for direct implementation of the various programme sectors including food distribution, emergency water provision, transport and logistics, infrastructure development, settlement development, registration and many aspects of social services/community development programme manager. The programme’s Field Coordinator, with support from section heads with a range of technical expertise, manages the 226 full-time staff and 20 or so casual labourers employed on a daily basis throughout the year.

VIII. PROJECT ADMINISTRATION, FINANCE, MONITORING, REPORTING

A. Management and Administration: The LWF/WS Field Coordinator based in Pakelle is the overall manager of the programme. In this he is assisted by senior section heads responsible for settlement, mechanical workshop and construction whilst administrative support is provided by senior staff in administration, accounts and stores. The section heads in turn are supported by supervisors, assistant supervisors and foremen. The Field Coordinator will be responsible through the LWF Country Representative for the provision of narrative, statistical, financial and audit reports as specified in the ACT reporting guidelines. Financial and audit reports will be provided with the assistance of the LWF Uganda Finance Officer and the LWF Kampala accounts department.

B. Monitoring: The Field Coordinator in conjunction with his section heads is responsible for monitoring all aspects of the programme. Regular monitoring is also undertaken by UNHCR, WFP and Ministry of Local Government. Monitoring is also undertaken through regular field visits by LWF Kampala based staff including the Representative, Monitoring/Reporting Officer, Finance Officer, Chief Accountant and other senior programme staff.

C. Financial Management and Central: Funds will be disbursed and monitored by both the programme accountant in Pakelle and the LWF Accounts department in Kampala under supervision of the LWF Finance Officer in Kampala.

IX. IMPLEMENTATION TIMETABLE

Assessment, Start-up, Implementation, Close-out, Transition

Project start-up date is 1 January 1998 with implementation throughout the year and close-out by 31 December 1998.

X. COORDINATION

Coordination with Other ACT Members
No other ACT members are active in the district in refugee assistance.

Established Coordination Mechanisms
Coordination among LWF, UNHCR, WFP, Ministry of Local Government, other NGO partners and Adjumani district departments is achieved through regular fortnightly meetings at the field level. Specific planning/coordination meetings are also chaired by UNHCR at field level on a very regular basis whilst coordination amongst UNHCR and its partners at national level is achieved through monthly meetings in Kampala.

Coordination with Government:
A refugee Desk Officer is responsible for coordination at the district level. He is assisted by a Camp Commandant and several deputies. The Desk Officer and Camp Commandant participate in all fortnightly general coordination meetings. At the national level the programme is formalised under an annual tripartite agreement between the Ministry of Local Government, UNHCR and LWF. LWF also has a signed agreement with WFP covering management and operation of Extended Delivery Points.

XI GENERAL

Additional Information
Resettlement of refugees on adequate productive land to enable them to achieve food self sufficiency in the space of 2-3 years is an all too rare phenomenon in the late 1990s. Yet the Sudanese refugees population in Adjumani district have this opportunity, thanks to the generosity of the local population and the government of Uganda. The generally good relations that currently exist between the nationals and the resettling refugees can not be taken for granted - these have to be built upon by providing assistance to both the local national population as well as the refugees. In this context capacity building of local national structures is vitally important so that the provision of services to both refugees and nationals can be integrated as far as possible.

XII. APPEAL BUDGET

ANTICIPATED APPEAL And PROJECT INCOME

Category / Description
Cash
Back Donor
In Kind
Total UShs
Total USD
ACT MEMBERS
Request to ACT Network
400,707,275
361,000
OTHER DONORS
* Confirmed Donations & Support (UNHCR and WFP)
1,909,273,260
1,720,066
In-kind Appeal Support
* Other confirmed in-kind donations (UNHCR and WFP)
3,651,900,000
3,290,000
Total Appeal & Project Income
5,961,880,535
$ 5,371,066
(* Full details of these components are available upon request).

PLANNED APPEAL EXPENDITURES

Category / Description
Type Unit
No. Units
Unit Cost UShs
Total Cost UShs
Total USD Budget
POST CRISIS ASSISTANCE
Food Distribution
Sugar
MT
20
987,900
19,758,000
17,800
Salt
MT
4.5
316,350
1,423,575
1,283
Meals, protection cases
families
30
28,000
840,000
757
Sub-total
22,021,575
19,840
Shelter Rehab and Construction
Huts for vulnerables
huts
20
140,000
2,800,000
2,523
Health & Related Activities for Disabled/Vulnerable
Wheelchair repair/maint.
chairs
80
40,000
3,200,000
2,883
Calipers, crutches etc.
persons
120
20,000
2,400,000
2,162
Soap (disabled/vulnerable)
carton
485
16,500
8,002,500
7,209
Used clothing
sets
2,500
8,000
20,000,000
18,018
Other misc. material support
persons
100
12,500
1,250,000
1,126
Sub-total
34,852,500
31,398
Rehabilitation (Vulnerable/Unaccompanied Minors Phase out
Start-up tools & raw materials
persons
100
50,000
5,000,000
4,505
Scholastic materials
persons
50
50,000
2,500,000
2,252
Foster family support
families
35
40,000
1,400,000
1,261
Sub-total
8,900,000
8,018
Training for Service Integration
Refugee Welfare Committees
RWC
25
89,000
2,225,000
2,005
Local Councils on infrastr. maint.
LCs
22
110,000
2,420,000
2,180
Children’s rights, all schools
schools
60
45,000
2,700,000
2,432
LC3s on planning/budgeting
persons
25
250,000
6,250,000
5,631
Socio-economic surveys
nr.
1
1,250,000
1,250,000
1,126
Sub-total
14,845,000
13,374
Local Council Capacity Building
Survey & prod. of detailed Maps
villages
82
140,000
11,480,000
10,342
Basic furniture, district office
lump
1
1,000,000
1,000,000
900
Basic furniture sub-county offices
lump
5
600,000
3,000,000
2,703
Manual typewriters, sub-counties
units
4
500,000
2,000,000
1,802
Filing cabinets LC offices
units
6
280,000
1,680,000
1,514
Sub-total
19,160,000
17,261
Training for Community Rehab.
Project field staff, social/comm service
staff
12
500,000
6,000,000
5,405
TRANSPORT, STORAGE, WAREHOUSE, HANDLING
Transport of Emergency Relief and Response Materials
Truck rental Kampala to Pakelle
MT
40
100,000
4,000,000
3,604
Warehousing, Storage, Handling
Labour loading, offloading (twice)
MT
80
4,000
320,000
290
CAPITAL EQUIPMENT (over $500)
General Equipment
Motorcycle procurement & licensing
pcs.
8
4,051,500
32,412,00
29,200
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
Computers and accessories
pcs.
2
4,995,00
9,990,000
9,000
Duplicating machine
pcs.
1
2,235,000
2,235,000
2,014
Communication Equipment
Sofware for H.F. Radio/ e-mail
units
1
1,110,000
1,110,000
1,000
Sub-Total
45,747,000
41,214
PERSONNEL, ADMINISTRATION, OPERATIONAL & OTHER SUPPORT COSTS
Staff Salaries and Related Support Costs:
Salaries
Field Co-ordinator (1)
months
12
5,089,350
61,072,200
55,020
Technical Section Heads (2)
months
19
4,884,000
92,796,000
83,600
Settlement Officer (1)
months
10
1,300,000
13,000,000
11,712
Asst. Social Services Coord (1)
months
12
510,000
6,120,000
5,514
Drivers (1)
months
12
165,000
1,980,000
1,784
Monitoring/Reporting Officer (1 @50%)
months
12
540,000
6,480,000
5,838
Insurance
National Staff Insurance
persons
3
388,500
1,165,500
1,050
Consultations/meetings (Senior Staff in Kampala)
Accommodation & meals
days
72
85,000
6,120,000
5,514
Staff Housing
House repair and maint.
Houses
3
500,000
1,500,000
1,350
Sub-total
190,233,700
171,382
Staff Travel
International Travel
tickets
2
1,332,00
2,664,000
2,400
Internal flights
seats
72
123,000
8,856,000
7,978
Sub-total
11,520,000
10,378
Office Operational Costs
Stationary and supplies
months
12
185,000
2,220,000
2,000
Training publications
lump
1
1,100,000
1,100,000
991
Office rent and security (20%)
months
12
440,000
5,280,000
4,757
Office utilities maintenance (20%)
months
12
200,000
2,400,000
2,162
Communication Costs
Telephone bills (16%)
months
12
300,000
3,600,000
3,243
Radio licence fees (HF)
radios
3
320,000
960,000
865
HF e-mail installation
radio
1
600,000
600,000
541
Vehicle Operating Costs
Fuel, petrol
ltrs.
2,250
1,110
2,479,500
2,250
Fuel, diesel
ltrs.
5,000
940
4,700,000
4,234
Lubricants, assorted
ltrs.
300
3,800
1,140,000
1,027
Repairs, spares and tyres
spares
lump
10,800,000
10,800,000
9,730
Insurance 8 m.c. & one çWD
months
12
140,000
1,680,000
1,514
Other Personnel, Administration and Operational Support Costs
Audit fees (part)
audit
1
2,220,000
2,220,000
2,000
Bank charges
lump
1
1,110,000
1,110,000
1,000
Sub-total
40,307,500
36,314
TOTAL APPEAL EXPENSES:
400,707,275
361,000
Note: Exchange rate $US 1.00 = 1,110 Ushs

APPEAL FACT SHEET

Appeal Number: AFUG81

Appeal Name:Adjumani - Sudanese Refugee Resettlement

Date Issued: 27 April 1998

Project Completion Date: 31 December 1998

Project Description: Assistance to Sudanese refugees in North East Uganda.

Implementing Partner
Activity Description

Appeal Target (USD)
LWF/WS
Food, Shelter, Health, Rehabilitation/Resettlement
US$ 361,000
TOTAL APPEAL TARGET: US$ 361,000

Pledges can be communicated to ACT by using the Appeal Pledge Form

ACT - Action by Churches Together
Account Number: 102539/0.01.61
Banque Edouard Constant
Cours de Rive 11
Case postale 3754
1211 Genève 3
SWITZERLAND

APPEAL PLEDGE FORM

(Please fax to the ACT Co-ordinating Office - Fax:++41 22 791 6506)

Appeal Name: Sudanese Ref. Resettlement
Appeal Number: AFUG81

Appeal Target: USD 361,000
Project Completion Date: 31 Dec. 1998

Contributing organization: ........................................
Telephone number:..............................

Contact person: ..........................................

.....................................
.....................
Signature
Date
1. Contributions to the ACT bank account: 102539/0.01.61
Amount
Expected
Other Details
(indicate currency)
Transfer Date
and Source of Funding
eg Own Funds, Government, Other
...................................
................................
..........................................................
...................................
................................
..........................................................
2. Contributions direct to an implementing partner:

Implementing
Appeal
Amount
Expected
Partner
Component
(indicate currency)
Transfer Date
.............................
..........................
..........................
......................
.............................
..........................
..........................
......................
3. Applications to back donors - Governments, ECHO, etc:

Application
Implementing
Appeal
Amount
Made to
Partner
Component
(indicate currency)
.............................
..........................
..........................
......................
.............................
..........................
..........................
......................