UNICEF South Sudan Humanitarian Situation Report, 1 - 31 August 2018

Report
from UN Children's Fund
Published on 31 Aug 2018

Highlights

• Since the signing of the peace agreement between the government and the opposition groups on 5 August in Khartoum, incidents of armed conflict have reduced significantly. However, the Ceasefire and Transitional Security Arrangements Monitoring Mechanism (CTSAMM) has accused government and SPLA-iO pro-Machar forces of violating the Permanent Ceasefire, following reported clashes in Unity and Bringi on 19 and 21 August, respectively.

• Despite ongoing conflict in areas of Greater Upper Nile, Greater Equatoria and Western Bahr el Ghazal, UNICEF was able to reopen and resume services at 10 outpatient therapeutic programme (OTP) sites, including in Koch (4), Leer (2), Mayendit (2) and Rubkona (2).

• World Breastfeeding Week was celebrated on 1-7 August, under the theme “Breastfeeding, Foundation of Life.” C4D implementing partners across the country supported the commemoration with activities such as radio messaging, public address systems and traditional dances to raise awareness on the importance of breastfeeding and improved health of new-born babies

Situation Overview and Humanitarian Needs

Since the signing of the peace agreement between the government and the opposition groups on 5 August in Khartoum, incidents of armed conflict have significantly reduced. However, CTSAMM has accused the government and SPLA-iO pro-Machar forces of committing major violations of the Permanent Ceasefire, following reported clashes in Northern Liech state (Unity) and Bringi area, 15 kilometres southwest of Wau town (Western Bahr el Ghazal) on 19 and 21 August, respectively.

Humanitarian aid workers continue to be targets for looting and violence across the country, with incidents reported in Central Equatoria, Jonglei and Eastern Equatoria in August 2018. According to the August 2018 Aid Worker Security Report, violence against aid workers in South Sudan continues to escalate in 2018, with record numbers of aid workers killed by gunfire in addition to a rise in aid worker kidnappings. As these incidents often occur in areas of insecurity/relative inaccessibility, the resulting halt of humanitarian activity that follows denies life-saving services to the communities who are often in greatest need.

According to the 7 August Food Security Situation Update published by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Food Programme (WFP) and UNICEF, persistent conflict, disruption of livelihoods, poor economic conditions and challenges faced in the delivery of humanitarian assistance have pushed nearly 60 per cent of the population into severe acute food insecurity during the peak of the lean season (June-July). Though the nutrition situation in South Sudan has historically improved following the conclusion of the lean period, due to harvest yields, increased livestock activity and access to milk and additional animal products, ongoing conflict is expected to disrupt these activities and impede access to harvest, particularly in areas in Greater Upper Nile, Greater Equatoria (GE) and Western Bahr el Ghazal (WBeG).