South Sudan

South Sudan Health Cluster Bulletin #29, 15 August 2014

Format
Situation Report
Source
Posted
Originally published
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Highlights

  • Health partners are supporting the Ministry of Health with preparedness in Ebola case detection and management Health partners have reported a decline in both cholera cases and deaths.

  • By 11 August 5,697 cases and 123 deaths (CFR 2.16%) had been reported since April 2014.

  • As of 11 August, altogether 5,697 cholera 123 deaths (CFR 2.16%) have been recorded in South Sudan since the outbreak began on 23 April 2014.

  • A total of 2,111,743 medical interventions have been conducted by health cluster partners since 15 December 2013.

Situation update

  • As of 11 August 2014, a total of 5,697 cholera cases including 123 deaths (CFR 2.16%) had been reported in South Sudan. Overall new cholera cases reduced from 825 in week 28 to 121 in week 32. Torit, Juba, Lopa-Lafon, Malakal and Magwi reported the highest number of cholera cases in week 32. Eastern Equatoria State accounts for the majority of cases – 2,404 of the total. Although the outbreak is beginning to plummet, there is need to scale up coverage of social mobilization and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions in the parts of Eastern Equatoria State that persistently report a high number of cases.

  • The food security situation remains precarious in most of South Sudan and continues to deteriorate, with severe malnutrition already being observed in some areas, while the threat of famine looms. Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) was the major cause of death among children under-5 in week 32.

  • The Ebola Viral Disease (EVD) outbreak affecting four countries in West Africa, is of public health concern and has prompted partners to engage in preparedness activities. Health partners are supporting the Ministry of Health through an inter-disciplinary Task Force that has been established and comprises key government ministries and humanitarian partners.

  • Insecurity in some states, namely Nassir in Upper Nile, continues to impede access to communities in need of health care.