Report of the Secretary-General on South Sudan (covering the period from 2 September to 14 November 2017) (S/2017/1011) [EN/AR]

Report
from UN Security Council
Published on 01 Dec 2017 View Original
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I. Introduction

  1. The present report is submitted pursuant to Security Council resolution 2327 (2016), by which the Council extended the mandate of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) until 15 December 2017 and requested me to report on the implementation of the mandate every 90 days. The report covers developments from 2 September to 14 November 2017. A special report will be submitted to the Security Council on the outcomes of the strategic review of UNMISS that I requested in September.

II. Political and economic developments

  1. The implementation of the Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in the Republic of South Sudan (peace agreement) remained minimal during the reporting period. Concurrently, the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) consulted with representatives from all parties to the peace agreement, armed opposition and other stakeholder groups, in preparation for its convening of a high - level revitalization forum. These consultations were aimed at discussing concrete measures to restore the permanent ceasefire, fully implement the peace agreement and develop a revised and realistic implementation schedule towards a democratic election at the end of the transition. While key stakeholders have expressed support for the initiative, there is still little consensus on what “revitalization” of the peace agreement actually entails.

  2. The Transitional Government of National Unity has continued to prioritize reconciliation efforts through the national dialogue, which is scheduled to be concluded by April 2018. Initial consultations at the subnational level have commenced in the largely Government-controlled areas of Central Equatoria, Northern Bahr el-Ghazal and Upper Nile. Challenges persist in ensuring inclusive participation, however, as many stakeholders perceive that the Government is using the national dialogue to override the implementation of the peace agreement.
    Meanwhile, the economy continues to deteriorate, with punishing implications for much of the population.