Somalia

WFP Somalia Activity Report - Oct/Nov 1999

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United Nations World Food Programme for Somalia
HIGHLIGHTS

Distribution to the Bay and Bakool regions: A convoy carrying 1,305 tons of food aid to Bay region on 21 November was re-routed back to the southern port of Merca on 8 December after poor road conditions due to heavy downpour hampered its access into the region. Alternate routes to transport the food are currently being considered.

Suspension of activities in Bakool region: WFP has suspended distribution in the Bakool region (excluding Wajid region) following the theft of part of the approximately 370 tons of food aid being delivered in Hodur early November. Following meetings held with the Somalia Country Director and authorities of the region in Baidoa, it was decided that WFP would stop operating in the Bakool region until the food had been replaced and distributed to identified vulnerable groups.

Food Security Highlights:

Bakool: The lack of Deyr rains has resulted in the lack of water, wild foods, pasture and complete crop failure. Whilst short-term showers have slightly improved the livestock condition, (except for cattle) in the pastoral zones, the food security situation in the agro-pastoral zone is seriously deteriorating. Unseasonal above normal population movements are observed towards the main villages and district centres.

Over the last few weeks, hundreds of very weak families have been arriving in Hodur, Bakool region, from surrounding rural areas and latest reports from Hodur indicate that the agro-pastoral families have now exhausted all coping mechanisms.

Gedo: Deyr rains remain unsatisfactory and are very poor and unevenly distributed throughout the region. Again, serious water shortages accompanied with poor pasture have resulted in pastoral migration within the region and to neighbouring regions where opportunities exist.

Bay: Deyr rains have been scattered and uneven. As a result, some farmers have moved towards crop established zones, like Baidoa, in search of agriculture and self-employment.

Hiran: The expected rains were late and cattle have started to die as a result of drought conditions. Water, pasture and grazing conditions are below normal in pastoral areas.

Deyr crop Establishment Assessment: The FSAU conducted a field assessment from 25 November - 5 December, followed by an aerial survey over main agricultural areas in southern Somalia in order to determine the extent of the 1999 Deyr crop. The Deyr, which is the minor agricultural season, normally accounts for a quarter of Somalia's agricultural production. The unusually late rains have meant a full assessment has been difficult. Results will be consolidated in upcoming weeks, however, preliminary findings indicate that the established area for cereals is 290,000 ha - 11.5% higher than it was during the Deyr 1998.

FOOD DISTRIBUTION SUMMARY - OCTOBER/ NOVEMBER 1999

WFP distributed 3,380 tons of food commodities to Somalia to over 300,000 beneficiaries during the months of October and November 1999. Of this, 67% was distributed to the south and central regions, 25% to the northeast and 8% to the northwest. This brings the total distributed from January to October to some 20,250 tons.

Beneficiaries reached, October/ November 1999

Zone
Metric tons distributed
Beneficiaries reached
Southern Somalia
2,272
227,100
Northeast
827
49,200
Northwest
281
39,160
TOTAL
3,380
315,460
Food distribution by commodity (Mt)
October
November
Maize
1,823
912
Wheat Flour
11
150
Pulses
207
122
Veg. Oil
51
29
CSB
63
12
TOTAL
2,155
1,225

LOGISTICS/ ITSH ASPECTS

Transhipments to Somalia: October and November 1999

The following vessels arrived in Somalia during the month of October. No vessels arrived in November.

Vessel
Loaded from
Arrival Date
Destination
Commodities (tons)
MV Marsus
Mombasa
8 October
Bosasso
Maize: 500
Pulses: 60
Oil: 20
TOTAL: 580 tons
MV Marsus
Mombasa
12 October
Berbera
Maize: 500
Pulses: 60
Oil: 20
CSB: 30.85
TOTAL: 610.85 tons
MV Miltzow
North Mogadishu
25 October
El Maan
Maize: 650
Pulses: 150
Oil: 50
TOTAL: 850 tons


WFP ACTIVITES BY ZONES OF OPERATION

I. SOUTH

Target Populations: Over 220,000 beneficiaries were reached with food assistance in the south during the months of October and November.

Food Distribution and Use: WFP Mogadishu distributed a total of 2,272 tons of food aid to southern Somalia during the months of October and November.

Mogadishu is still hosting close to 300,000 internally displaced persons from Baidoa and Bakool areas. WFP Mogadishu works closely with a number of NGOs in Mogadishu such as Muslim-Aid UK, IARA, AL-Dawa and 'American Friends' in various feeding projects and in the support of 18 camps in the south.

Galgaduud Distribution: In October, WFP distributed 660 tons of food commodities to over 60,000 vulnerable people in the central region of Galagaduud.

Galgaduud has been a victim of prolonged drought, resulting in crop failure, poor pasture and the low prices of livestock and poor purchasing power. Insecurity has compounded the situation and the poor accessibility of the supply routes from Mogadishu has resulted in a precarious food security situation and the exhaustion of coping mechanisms.

Poor road conditions in the semi-desert region hampered the operation as most trucks could not reach EDPs away from the main towns. This resulted in tense negotiations between contractors and elders and led to a WFP food aid monitor being threatened and shot at, at the actual distribution site. Fortunately, he escaped unhurt.

Logistics: The MV Miltzow arrived at the port of El Ma'an in October carrying a total of 850 tons of food commodities: 650 tons of maize, 150 tons pulses and 50 tons of vegetable oil. No vessels arrived during the month of November.

Security: On 25 October, the Somali Marehan militiamen fired on a WFP-charted convoy near the WFP compound in Bardera. The issue was related to guard contracts for the vehicles hired by WFP in the Baidoa area. There were no casualties.

Coordination: A CARE/WFP coordination meeting was held in October to discuss and review geographic locations and strategies with respect to food distribution in Gedo, Bay and Bakool regions. It has been recommended that the following operational divisions apply:

BAY: CARE: Burakhaba, Quansandhere and East Baidoa

WFP: Berdale, Dinsor, Baidoa (town and SW Baidoa)

BAKOOL: CARE: Tieglow

WFP: Wajid and Hodur

GEDO: CARE: Garbaharey, Burdhubho

WFO: Bardera

The meeting decided that no food-for-work activities will be implemented in January pending the onset of the Deyr harvest. CARE would implement emergency food distribution activities in October and start food-for-work activities in November. WFP would provide emergency food rations in its new areas of operation for a further period of two months before switching to food-for-work.

II. NORTHEAST

Target Populations: Over 49,000 vulnerable people were reached through food distributions carried out by WFP Bosasso during the months of October and November.

Food Distribution and Use: WFP Bosasso distributed 401 tons of food aid commodities during the month of October and a further 426 tons during the month of November to various projects. These included the rehabilitation of administrative buildings, construction of water reservoirs and road repairs, the social support of five orphanage centres and the TB hospital in Bosasso and relief distributions to the internally displaced and flood-affected victims of Jeded village.

Monitoring: Puntland Food Security Assessment: Results from an initial FSAU food security assessment for the northeast region of Mudug, showed that better-off pastoralists are now poor, and poor pastoralists have become destitute (with no livestock, or unsustainable small herds). The pastoralists are being supported by relatives in rural areas, in urban centres, and in camps for displaced people.

Food insecurity of the worst affected pastoralist group was found to be aggravated by:

  • Poor livestock conditions in April resulted in no reproduction expected for 'shoats' until April/May 2000 and for camels until October 2000. Herd restocking has been delayed and the scarcity of milk has resulted in the high milk prices.
  • High prices of imported food staples (rice and sugar) due to inflation and hence poor terms of trade for pastoralists, despite high shoat prices.

Livestock condition is expected to improve over the next six weeks, in time for the peak export season this year. However, no restocking of herds can be expected until after the gu rains in April/May next year. In particular, destitute and poor pastoralists in rural areas will continue to require support. In addition, destitute displaced pastoralists will also require assistance to enable them to return from camps to rural areas.

Logistics: The MV Marsus arrived in Bosasso on 8 October carrying 500 tons maize, 60 tons pulses and 20 tons of vegetable oil.

III. NORTHWEST

Target Populations: Close to 39,200 beneficiaries were reached during the reporting period.

Food Distribution and Use: A total of 46 tons of food aid was released through Hargeisa and Berbera during the month of October and 235 tons in November. The food was distributed to various feeding centres, TB hospitals and street children.

Following a food security assessment conducted by FSAU for Somaliland from 13 - 27 October, it was found that most food economy groups were becoming less vulnerable due to the improving economic (livestock) and climatic conditions and the food aid and agricultural assistance delivered to this region.

However, pockets of vulnerability still exist. The current acute food insecurity is concentrated among the poor pastoralists in Hawd areas of Sool and Toghdeer with the affected population estimated to be between 40 – 60,000 people. Levels of chronic vulnerability have been rising and have deteriorated into the present acute food insecurity. It is expected that the acute vulnerability will diminish in two to three months as livestock condition (for sale) and production (for milk) improves. A further assessment will be undertaken.

FSAU has proposed immediate food/cash assistance for a period of six to eight weeks to protect minimal assets and improve nutrition and structural interventions and access to water for poor households.

Monitoring: Monthly monitoring of feeding centres in Boroma took place on 9 November with no major issues reported.

Logistics: The MV Marsus arrived in Berbera during the month of October carrying 500 tons maize, 60 tons pulses, 20 tons vegetable oil and 30.85 tons CSB.

PRRO 6073.00 - Resourcing Status, As at Dec. 17, 1999

DONOR
AMOUNT US$
METRIC TONS
Netherlands
1,625,000
1,775
Switzerland
117,450
102
Denmark
837,682
1,000
Germany
1,103,905
1,500
Ireland
265,957
265
Italy
4,000,000
3,980
Sweden
230,000
150
EU
8,000,000
8,500
Saudi Arabia
118,948
100
CIDA
1,008,062
1,120
Japan
3,900,000
4,622
TOTAL
21,207,004
23,114
PRRO 6073.00 - Requirements July 1999 - June 2000: 29,534 TONS
BALANCE REQUIRED TO JUNE 2000: 6,420 TONS

Close to 6,500 tons is yet to be resourced until June 2000 with a break in the pipeline expected in April 2000 should these requirements not be fulfilled.

COMMODITY TRACKING SYSTEM - CTS

The month of October saw the installation of the Commodity Movement Processing and Analysis System (COMPAS) in the Somalia Country Office in Nairobi. The installation of COMPAS was overseen by a CTS representative from Rome together with the CTS Somalia team. Two observers from the DRC also attended the installation.

COMPAS is WFP’s global commodity tracking system. It is an electronic system for monitoring the progress of commodities from the time of their arrival through to their hand over to implementing partners.

Using COMPAS you can see how much of any commodity is now available, how much is due to arrive and how these commodities compare with the needs.

COMPAS implementation in the Somalia Country Office is planned to be effected as soon as possible, and the main focus will be on food commodities received and dispatched under the PRRO 6073. The immediate emphasis would be to focus on the reporting tool and report formats incorporated into COMPAS. Various departments and persons who usually source information from CTS are being approached to aid in underpinning report requirements that may be feasibly obtained from COMPAS.

INTERNAL MANAGEMENT ASPECTS

  • The Horn of Africa Food Aid Targeting and Distribution in Complex Emergencies Forum was successfully held at the Naro Moru River Lodge - Nanyuki, Kenya, from 29 November to 4 December 1999. The forum allowed for learning, sharing of information, identifying and adopting appropriate and realistic targeting and food distribution methods especially in Somalia and southern Sudan. At the end of it, workplans were produced for Somalia and southern Sudan to guide in application of the agreed best practices.
  • Mr. James Legg joins WFP Somalia as OIC for Bosasso starting 8 November. He replaces Mr. Elmigdad Abdalla who has moved to WFP Rwanda.
  • Ms. Kaniz Khan joins WFP Somalia as OIC for Hargeisa starting 18 November. Kaniz replaces Mr. El Saeid Sirelkhatim who takes up the position as Logistics Officer with WFP Burundi.
  • Ms. Evelyn Etyang joins WFP's Programming Unit as data entry clerk, and will be working on streamlining the flow of data from the various field stations, and the logistics operations.

(All tonnages in the report refer to metric tons)