Somalia

Conflict displaces hundred of thousands in Somalia

Source
Posted
Originally published
Many describe the situation in Mogadishu, Somalia's capital, as the worst fighting in the last sixteen years of the country's troubled history. As the violence continues, over 300,000 people - a third of Mogasishu's population - have fled the city, making this the largest new population displacement in the world this year.

The people forced from their homes are predominantly women, children and elderly people, who now find themselves with no proper shelter, food, clean water, sanitation, health facilities or protection. Some rent space under trees for shelter but such an environment leaves them vulnerable to frequent attacks, harassment, theft and rape. Meanwhile, those who lack the means to leave Mogadishu are trapped in the city, moving from one neighbourhood to the next to try to avoid the fighting.

People fleeing the city are headed to South-Central regions - an area of Somalia already suffering the effects of years of drought and severe flooding. These regions are unable to cope with the sheer number of new arrivals. Health facilities have already been stretched to breaking point leading to cholera and diarrhoea outbreaks. Homeless people are in desperate need of clean water and shelter materials.

CARE has considerable experience in managing emergency operations, however the scope of a crisis such as this means that we need help. Please donate now to CARE Australia's ongoing emergency work.

CARE's response

Although the deteriorating situation makes it increasingly hard to reach the people most in need, CARE continues to operate across Somalia. CARE will assist 150,000 people with food, water and education activities:

Food

CARE will distribute much needed food supplies to 60,000 people when the security situation allows.

Water

- CARE will supply water in trucks to 2500 households

- We are working to maintain existing water sources are free from contamination through proper management.

- CARE has surveyed other water sources and will use these findings to conduct a project to provide water to the displaced populations.

Emergency kits

CARE, partnering with UNICEF, will assist 43,000 people with Family Relief Kits containing items such as plastic sheeting, blankets, water containers and soap.

Education

CARE is identifying local people to become teachers so that children living in camps can keep going to school.

CARE has considerable experience in managing emergency operations, however the scope of a crisis such as this means that we need help. Please donate now to CARE Australia's ongoing emergency work.

CARE has been working in Somalia since 1981 primarily on large-scale emergency relief and refugee assistance activities, construction of water facilities, primary health care, small scale enterprise development, local institution building, primary school education, and agriculture. With the outbreak of civil war in 1991, CARE moved its main office to Nairobi, but continued to maintain sub-offices in Puntland, Somaliland and southern Somalia. CARE has also been providing assistance to refugees in Ifo, Hagadera and Dagahaley camps in Dadaab, Kenya since 1992. Specific CARE programmes also cater to the needs of the surrounding populations in the North Eastern Province of Kenya. In the camps, CARE's activities focus on food security and logistics, water provision, environmental sanitation, community development and education.