Somalia

Cash-based assistance to support displaced families in Bardera

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Displacement continues to be a reality for 2.6 million people across Somalia, while insecurity, droughts and floods exacerbate the humanitarian situation.

ACTED and its partner the Social-Life and Agricultural Development Organization (SADO), provide multi-purpose cash assistance to displaced households affected by the prolonged drought and conflict, in order to ensure they have access to enough food, while boosting their livelihoods.

525 vulnerable displaced families supported through cash-for-work

In Somalia, the recurring droughts continue to impact people’s lives and livelihoods, significantly increasing the number of people in need for immediate assistance. In Bay, Lower Juba and Gedo regions, the below-average gu rainfalls have resulted in the deterioration of the food security situation.

ACTED and SADO have been providing conditional cash transfers worth 60 USD to 525 of the most vulnerable and food insecure households living in IDP sites, with funding from USAID’s Office of Food for Peace (FFP).

A conditional transfer requires beneficiaries to undertake a specific action or activity in order to receive assistance. In this project, the beneficiary households were hired as cash for workers s as a condition to receive the transfer. The rehabilitation works included key livelihood assets such as feeder roads, water catchments, camp fencing and canals.

Meeting displaced families’ most basic needs

Vulnerable displaced people living in Bardera were , taking kids out of the school when they are not able to pay school fees, and taking debts . Following the rehabilitation works, each family received 60 USD per month for a period of six months. This money allowed these very vulnerable families to buy enough food to meet their most basic needs, while also , for example by purchasing goats for milk production. The milk can be sold and also used for the household’s consumption. Some people used the money to open a small business, like tea shops. In addition, the cash transfers also provided the community with the financial means and flexibility to access medical care, and to pay the school fees for their children.

Osman, a 55-year-old father of seven children, has lived in Xabal IDP camp for four years since he was displaced from his home due to recurrent drought and conflict.

It was difficult for me to meet the basic needs of my family. I used to rely on casual labour, with opportunities only once in a while and for very little money. My life has changed since I joined this cash-for-work programme: I received cash on a monthly basis for a period of six months, which allowed me to buy enough food for my family. It also allowed me to open a tea shop which is now a source of livelihood for my family. Thanks to this, I will be able to provide for my family’s need in the future

OSMAN, BENEFICIARY OF THE CASH-FOR-WORK PROGRAMME