Russia

Humanitarian Assistance in the Northern Caucasus (Russian Federation) Information Bulletin: As of 21 Dec 1999

Format
Situation Report
Source
Posted
Originally published


The Number of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs)

IDPs from Chechnya Registered in Ingushetia*
247,000
IDPs who have moved on to other regions*
31,000
Persons who have moved into Georgia**
5,000
Approximate total of IDPs in Ingushetia
211,000
Source:
*Ingushetia Migration Service, as of 14 December 1999
**UNHCR Georgia

The number of IDPs in Ingushtia remains difficult to verify. Several thousand persons have moved on to other regions. Further, there are daily movements of persons move from Chechnya to Ingushetia and from Ingushetia to Chechnya and it is unclear to what extent the same people are moving back and forth. In addition, some reports indicate that as many as 30,000 to 40,000 persons have returned to Chechnya and are staying there.

The UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) conducted an initial survey of 764 IDPs staying with 463 members of host families in Ingushetia on 11-13 December 1999. The survey concluded that the IDPs’ situation is marked by overcrowding, a lack of adequate supplies, and that considerable efforts need to be made to meet the basic relief needs. Data emerging from the survey indicate, for example: an average extended IDP family size in a host family is 8.23 persons; on average, 19 persons share one latrine or toilet; 87% of the IDPs intend to stay in Ingushetia during the next three months; 78% of IDPs are women and children; 45% of IDPs are children under 18 years of age; 8% of displaced children have been separated from their parents; 16% of the IDPs’ family members remained in Chechnya; 7% of the IDPs had relatives who were killed or injured in Chechnya; 57% of the IDPs had to pay for medical treatment. Only every fifth IDP have received a blanket; 1.7% of IDPs have received a mattress; 1.3% IDPs have received winter clothing, 12% of IDPs population have to share a toilet/latrine with 30 or more persons. Only 1.25% of host families have received aid.

The most urgent needs indicated by the IDPs were (in order of priority): food; adequate water supplies; improvement of sanitary conditions; winter clothes and shoes; medical care including vaccination; improvement of shelter conditions; sanitary napkins; beds, mattresses, and sheets; fuel, kitchen sets, and heaters.

The Humanitarian Response

The Federal Migration Service and the Russian Red Cross have launched a relief programme in Stavropol Krai on behalf of the people who have fled from Chechnya since September 1999. The programme, "Aid to the forced migrants from Chechnya staying outside the conflict zone," will be carried out until April 2000 and aims to provide food, hygienic items, clothing and footwear, and bedding to the displaced. All of the relief items will be shipped from Moscow to Mineralnye Vody and delivered to IDPs at 7 distribution points at the district committees of the Red Cross.

The UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) dispatched its sixteenth relief convoy to Ingushetia on 16 December 1999 containing 180 MTs of food and non-food items. The agency is currently averaging two food and non-food convoys per week. UNHCR and the Danish Refugee Council (DRC) have agreed to work together, and are collaborating with Emercom, to establish and manage additional warehouses, deliver relief items from warehouses to village distribution committees, and monitor final distributions.

The UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) has started off-shore and local procurement of relief supplies. The first air shipment consisting of water supplies and sanitation materials, educational supplies, medical equipment, and children’s winter clothing is expected in Vladikavkaz in early January. To ensure effective management and monitoring, UNICEF plans to assign a project officer to Stravropol, a logistics officer to Vladikavkaz, and an assistant project officer to Nazran.

The World Health Organisation, (WHO) held the second health coordination meeting on Friday 17 December, at which several agencies active in health, nutrition, and water and sanitation activities participated. Agencies agreed at the meeting to elaborate and use a common form for health assessment. WHO has now established a presence in Stavropol and will be meeting the Ministry of Health officials of Ingushetia and Dagestan shortly to discuss disease monitoring and coordination. The third issue of WHO North Caucasus Emergency Health Update is available on: www.who.dk/ch/cor/welcome.htm.

The World Food Programme (WFP) and the Emercom of Russia have agreed on a memorandum of understanding, from 17 December 1999 to 16 December 2000, regarding the distribution of WFP supplied food commodities for 150,000 IDPs in the northern Caucasus. WFP plans on posting a liaison officer in Moscow in the immediate future.

The Russian Red Cross dispatched a twelve-member team to Dagestan, North Ossetia, and Kabardino-Balkaria. The team is strengthening the capacity of local Red Cross volunteers to distribute clothing and footwear, the improve the baking and distribution of bread, and to improve the work of medical clinics.

International NGOs are increasingly active in the northern Caucasus: nineteen have carried out or are planning on exploratory missions to the region and seven have started working in Ingushetia. In addition to its work with UNHCR, DRC continues to focus on the distribution of winter clothing and footwear and is targeting some 40,000 persons primarily in spontaneous settlements. To date, DRC has distributed 8,264 coats and boots since its first transport on 27 November 1999. Medecins du Monde (MDM) has four dispensaries which since 9 November 1999 have been providing primary health care and mental care to some 23,000 beneficiaries in five IDP camps in Ingushetia (Severni, Sputnik, and three camps in Karabulak). MDM’s 35 medical staff provided some 6,500 consultations during one month.

UN Inter-Agency Flash Appeal

The flash appeal has received a strong response from the donor community. The tables below present a summary of requirements and the response by appealing agencies and donors.

Table I: Requirements and contributions to specific agencies, as of 14 December 1999

Agency
Requirements
US$
Pledges/
Contributions US$
Shortfall US$
% Needs covered
UNFPA
400,000
400,000
UNHCR
8,300,000
8,453,441
100.0
UNICEF
1,100,000
659,027
440,973
59.9
WFP
5,300,000
1,102,041
4,197,959
20.8
WHO
742,000
330,020
411,980
44.5
OCHA/UN
345,000
322,027
22,973
93.3%
Total:
16,187,000
10,866,556
5,473,885
67.1%
Table II: Contributions by donor, as reported to OCHA, as of 14 December 1999
Donor
Agency
Amount in US $
Canada
UNHCR
266,000
Canada
UNICEF
68,027
Canada
WFP
102,041
Canada
OCHA
68,027
Denmark
UNHCR
405,954
Finland
UNHCR
176,668
France
UNHCR
160,136
Germany
UNHCR
440,399
Japan
UNHCR
500,000
Norway
UNHCR
1,312,102
Switzerland
UNHCR
641,262
United Kingdom
OCHA
100,000
United Kingdom
UNICEF
250,000
United Kingdom
WFP
1,000,000
United Kingdom
WHO
100,000
United States
OCHA
154,000
United States
UNHCR
3,100,000
United States
UNICEF
341,000
United States
WHO
230,020
EC/ECHO
UNHCR
1,050,420
Qatar Charitable Society
UNHCR
400,500
Total:
10,866,556
In addition to the above contributions, several cash and in-kind contributions to the region are being channeled outside the UN system. Donors are encouraged to notify OCHA of their contributions, specifying the value and the agency carrying out the programme.

Produced by the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), Moscow
Tel: 232-3011; Fax: 232-3017; email: ocha.russia@mtu-net.ru

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit https://www.unocha.org/.