Philippines

No more excuses! The next disaster is coming, what are you doing about it?

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*By Robert Kaufman, Head of Philippines Country Office, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. *

Imagine getting hit by six typhoons during a deadly pandemic. For millions of people in the Philippines, this is their reality as 2020 comes crashing to a close. Predictions of the increasing severity and frequency of emergencies have come true.

It's heart-breaking, exhausting, and scary. But most of all it's frustrating as much of this human and economic toll can be prevented.

We have known about the brutal effects of climate change for a long time, yet we haven't been doing enough to fix it. Debates about the effects of climate change or whether partners should support more preparedness are failing people. If your roof blows off three times in one month and this extreme weather happens with relentless certainty, there's nothing to debate. It is time to prepare more for what's coming.

We know that the Philippines is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world, topping the charts with the most disasters of all countries the past two years. It's number two for the past decade just behind China.

We know the number of climate-related disasters has risen almost 35% since the 1990s. The stuff of Hollywood movies has become a reality for tens of millions of people around the world, as they face bigger, more violent storms and more disease outbreaks.

For decades we anticipated another pandemic. Hollywood blockbusters told horror stories of contagious diseases. Since 2008, we've seen fantasy become reality with several pandemics, the H1N1 flu virus, SARS and now COVID-19. Yet somehow, the world has been taken by surprise.

Let's make no mistake, we have made inroads. Governments, humanitarian agencies and countless communities deserve credit for helping to save lives. Just seven years ago, the most destructive typhoon to hit the Philippines on record, Haiyan, killed close to 7,000 people. When Typhoon Goni hit in 2020, a storm as strong as Haiyan, less than 70 lives were lost. Still, I'm frustrated.

Early on in management, I learned that when you spend significant time and money on something, it is a priority. Most of the time and money in the aid sector is still spent on response, as if we don't know what's coming; neither the humanitarian community, the policymakers, nor the big donors.

Why are we not using our extraordinary capacity to anticipate crises to prioritize our time and money? What price do we need to place on the lives of people who have died or had their livelihoods ripped apart by disease and disaster before we change our priorities?

Today, we largely know the types of risks we are going to face, where they are going to hit and even in many cases, when. Many of the answers are clear as day. Typhoons strike the Philippines every November and December. Floods always follow drought in East Africa.

We know the risks and we know what to do about it. The latest study on the value of preparedness confirms what we already knew. Every dollar invested in reducing risks from climate-related disasters saves us $6 when we are fixing up the mess, according to the United States Institute of Building Sciences and the United Nations.

Super Typhoon Goni packed the most powerful winds of any storm in the world last year. Together with typhoon Vamco and other major storms, they came at a huge cost, seriously affecting the lives of more than 8.1 million people. More than 425,000 homes have been damaged or destroyed.

Among the millions whose livelihoods were disrupted, at least 200,000 farmers and fishermen lost their only source of income. The cost of agricultural damages totalled more than ₱12.3 billion (US260m) according to the Philippines Department of Agriculture.

Together, the storms were considered the second most expensive typhoons on record, costing more than $US 1 billion.

Money normally reserved for responding after disasters strike needs to be made available earlier and for longer-term solutions.

We need to stop soil erosion, plant trees and improve drainage. We need to avoid crop wastage with better grain storage and irrigation. We need to build safer houses with stronger and more permanent foundations. We need to protect land rights and strengthen economic development and social protection programs so that people are not dependent on aid when disaster strikes.

There needs to be a public accounting of how well resource allocation aligns with scientific prediction and the lessons we have learned.

We must put our money where our mouth is. Failing is a dereliction of our responsibility to those most at risk and to ourselves.

This past year, millions have faced often insurmountable hardships and heartache. We have a duty to protect the hope and dignity of those we pledge to support by ensuring everyone has a fair chance of a decent life.

There just can't be any more excuses.