Peru + 1 more

Protection Monitoring Peru: Snapshot (October 2021)

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This snapshot summarizes the main findings of the Protection Monitoring exercise that was conducted in Lima, Peru in October2021 as part of the humanitarian intervention of the Danish Refugee Council (DRC) and ENCUENTROS SJM. This project is implemented with funding from the European Union Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid (ECHO) and through a consortium named “Alliance for Protection Programming (AFPP)” which includes two INGOs: the Danish Refugee Council (DRC), and Humanity and Inclusion (HI). To view the interactive dashboard with the findings from this period and since the beginning of the Protection Monitoring program, click here.

INTRODUCTION

During October 2021, DRC and ENCUENTROS SJM interviewed 65 households accounting for a total of 240 persons. Since the beginning of the Protection Monitoring exercise in Peru in October 2020, 950 households have been interviewed reaching a total of 3,223 persons.

CONTEXT UPDATE

IMPACT OF THE VENEZUELAN DIASPORA IN THE ECONOMY OF PERU

  • According to the study* conducted by the Peru-Venezuela Chamber of Business (CAVENPE for its acronym in Spanish) in 2020, the Venezuelan diaspora has contributed over 138 million Soles (approximately 35 million USD) to the Peruvian economy. These contributions were made mostly through the payment of general sales tax (IGV for its Spanish acronym) and income tax, although Venezuelans earn about 16.7% less than Peruvian nationals.

  • In addition, the study highlighted that the economic contribution of Venezuelan nationals to Peru’s Gross Domestic Product could be as high as 292 million PEN (approximately 73 million USD) if more investments were made to incorporate qualified human capital from the Venezuelan diaspora into Peru’s job market. Currently, 47.5% of refugees and migrants over 18 years old residing in Peru hold a university diploma or have technical training. However, they have yet to be incorporated into Peru’s job market as only 10% of them exercise their profession in the country due to hurdles such as lack of documentation, difficulties to regularize their diplomas, and limiting labor laws that distinguish between the hiring of Peruvians and foreigners.

DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS BETWEEN VENEZUELA AND PERU

In October, Presidents Nicolas Maduro of Venezuela and Pedro Castillo of Peru announced the reestablishment of diplomatic relations between the two countries, with the appointment of new diplomatic representatives. This is happening four years after Peru withdrew its diplomatic representation from Caracas and three months after the Venezuelan diplomatic representation in Peru was removed from the country. As a consequence of these renewed relations, both countries are discussing a joint strategy to assist Venezuelan refugees and migrants in Peru and Peruvian migrants in Venezuela.