West and Central Africa: Weekly Regional Humanitarian Snapshot (19 - 25 June 2018)

Infographic
from UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Published on 25 Jun 2018

CAMEROON
GOVERNMENT LAUNCHES RELIEF PLAN FOR WESTERN REGIONS
On 18 May, the Government launched an 18-month emergency humanitarian assistance plan for the conflict-hit North-West and SouthWest regions. The US$22.6 million plan is to provide lifesaving assistance and implement early recovery activities focusing on socioeconomic reintegration, promotion of social cohesion and rehabilitation of damaged infrastructure. Around 160,000 people have been displaced by violence in the regions and more than 20,000 have fled to neighbouring Nigeria.

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC
TWO AID GROUPS RESUME WORK OVER INSECURITY WORK IN KAGA BANDORO
Two international aid organizations resumed operations in the northern Kaga Bandoro town in the week starting on 11 June after a month-long suspension due to insecurity. Attacks against aid workers, armed robberies on aid groups’ premises and personnel persist in much of the country. The security situation remains volatile in Kaga Bandoro. On 21 June members of two armed groups erected barricades in the town following a dispute over illegal taxation, forcing humanitarian actors to limit their activities.

COTE D’IVOIRE
HEAVY FLOODS KILL 18 IN ABIDJAN
Heavy floods triggered by torrential rains on 18 June killed at least 18 people in the commercial capital Abidjan. Flood waters rose up to 2.5 metres high, inundating houses and destroying property across six neighbourhoods in the coastal city. Rescue teams saved 115 people. Several people were forced to seek refuge with other families. A few of them have returned to their homes. The authorities plan to demolish structures in flood-prone areas and compensate the owners. Deadly floods are common during the rainy season that runs from June to October.

DR CONGO
MEASLES ERUPTS IN THREE PROVINCES
Health authorities on 20 June reported measles outbreak in 10 of the 27 health zones across Haut-Katanga, Lualuba and Haut-Lomami provinces in the country’s east. Experts attribute the outbreak to low vaccine coverage, high population mobility and limited access for health workers. There are concerns that the epidemic could worsen the humanitarian situation in the areas that are already hosting a large number of IDPs and returnees.

MALI
SIX AID GROUPS SUSPEND WORK OVER INSECURITY
Six international aid groups suspended operations on 18 June in Menaka region due to rising violence against humanitarian workers and their premises. Attacks on aid workers have been on the rise since November 2017. Security patrols launched late last year were recently halted, leading to new attacks and robberies on humanitarians.
OCHA and the UN Humanitarian Coordinator are in discussion with aid organizations, peacekeeping, foreign and national armed forces on ways to improve humanitarian access.

NIGERIA
OVER 100,000 CHILDREN MISS POLIO VACCINATION
More than 100,000 children in north-east Nigeria are cut off from polio vaccination due to ongoing hostilities that have prevented vaccination teams from reaching many areas, the Health Ministry said on 18 June.
Around 30 per cent of communities in Borno state has not been covered by the vaccination teams. Polio re-erupted in Nigeria in 2016 after two years, prompting a series of emergency vaccination drives in the region and in neighbouring countries.

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:

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