Northeast Nigeria Response (Borno State): Health Sector Bulletin #22, 31 March 2017

Report
from World Health Organization, Government of Nigeria, Health Cluster
Published on 31 Mar 2017

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Despite security challenges in Borno state, more than 14,000 volunteers were deployed to vaccinate 1.9 million children under 5-years old against wild poliovirus. The exercise, which is the first nationwide campaign against polio this year, took place from 25 to 29 March 2017. WHO and partners have trained 1,817 house-to-house, 410 fixed posts and 362 transit teams in addition to 150 health camps across 206 wards in all local government areas (LGAs) except Abadam and Marte due to insecurity.

  • Risk of disease outbreaks looms as temperatures continue to rise over the coming weeks and months. For instance, the rainy season in April will further heighten the risk of cholera and meningitis epidemics and cases of malaria.

  • More than 84 Mobile Health Teams are operational across accessible areas in Borno state providing health services to the affected population.

  • According to the Cadre Harmonisé report released in March, more than 50,000 people could experience famine-like conditions across the North-East from June to August. Food insecurity in the region is projected to rise to 5.2 million people in the three most affected states in the coming months

Situation update:

Boko Haram insurgency continues in the form of suicide bombings (PIED) and armed attacks resulting in casualties especially in the surrounding villages, military locations and IDPs camps in Maiduguri. As of 22 March 2017, it was reported that PBIED attack occurred at Gulumba IDP Camp in Muna Dalti. In Gulumba IDPs Camp, security sources reported that an attack likely involved PBIEDs, which detonated, causing injuries and death.

There were reportedly 20 casualties, 4 dead including the PBIEDs and 14 injured.

Humanitarian access remains a great challenge, and humanitarian partners are also gearing up for the upcoming rainy season to mitigate risks for response delivery. While humanitarian partners have scaled up emergency response in all sectors, gaps remain and new needs continue to emerge in outlying areas due to population movements and returns from inside the Borno sate and neighboring countries Niger, Chad and Cameroon.

According to the Cadre Harmonisé report released in March, more than 50,000 people could experience famine-like conditions across the North-East from June to August. Food insecurity in the region is projected to rise to 5.2 million people in the three most affected states in the coming months. Borno state will be worst affected, with 43,066 persons expected to be in Phase 5, followed by the states of Adamawa (3,690) and Yobe (3,295). Ongoing conflict and attacks have prevented farmers from growing crops for over three consecutive years triggering severe food crisis in the largely agrarian region. The Cadre Harmonisé (CH) is the current regional framework for consensual analysis of food insecurity situations. It aims to prevent food insecurity in West and Central Africa and includes the participation of Governments, UN Agencies, NGOs and donors. Food availability is expected to decline normally towards The recommendations of the framework analysis highlight the need to scale up the emergency humanitarian assistance to improve food and nutrition security situation, save lives and protect livelihood conditions. The framework also suggests to strengthen the ongoing responses to malnutrition in the sixteen states, particularly in the three north east States before the next lean season. Improvement of food access for the poorest people especially those living in the remote areas is also a priority for the humanitarian actors.

Responding to the health needs in remote areas, 84 mobile teams are operational with the support of Federal Ministry of Health, WHO and Health Sector Partners in Borno state. The teams are regularly working in communities and health facilities delivering essential health care including treatment of minor ailments, safe deliveries, nutrition screening, and health promotion across 23 accessible LGAs.
Some of the health partners have started their interventions in the rehabilitation or renovation of health facilities where the health facilities are non-functional due to damages to the infrastructure and assets.
Population displacement and return are ongoing as for the last few weeks there is a continuous daily influx of IDPs in Dikwa LGA due to which the total population caseload has reached to 150,000 people in both camps and host community. The influx is from Bama, Ngala and surrounding villages of Dikwa LGA. Like other services health services are also overstretched. People are living in congested environment in camps and some host communities which create public health risk in terms of disease outbreak. Disease surveillance and monitoring of health situation is an urgent priority. WHO surveillance team is in touch with the state MoH to improve disease surveillance and reporting from Dikwa. Shelter and CCCM sectors are struggling to provide additional shelter support to the new arrivals and improve the living condition of people specially in the camps. ICRC, UNICEF, WHO, FHI-360 and Federal government mobile medical teams are providing health services in Dikwa. UNICEF is supporting three PHC centers including one MCH center in host community and two health clinics in IDP camps.

WHO has deployed a Hard to Reach team providing health services in the surrounding host communities. The referral services are not enough to cater the needs of additional caseload of IDPs.