Nigeria

Nigeria Humanitarian Situation Report - 1 February 2016

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Highlights

  • According to IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) Round VII Report (December, 2015), there are an estimated 1.72 million people displaced as a consequence of the conflict in Adamawa, Borno, Gombe and Yobe.

  • A joint Recovery and Peace Building Assessment (RPBA) will be conducted by the Government of Nigeria, the United Nations, the European Union and the World Bank in the North East. The RPBA will cover the states of Adamawa, Bauchi, Borno, Gombe, Taraba and Yobe. Field missions to the states will begin in February.

  • An outbreak of Lassa fever occurred across 19 states, including Taraba and Gombe. While, no cases were recorded in Adamawa which borders Gombe, emergency response teams were formed in three zones in Adamawa in preparation of possible outbreak.

  • UNICEF and its state partners scaled up the response in health, providing integrated primary health care (PHC) services in IDP camps and host communities through 108 health facilities (31 camp clinics and 105 host community health clinics) in Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states.

Situation Overview & Humanitarian Needs

The conflict between Jama’atu Ahlis Sunna Lidda’awati wal-Jihad (JAS), commonly known as Boko Haram, and the Nigerian Security Forces (NSF) in the North East of Nigeria is entering its seventh year. According to IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) Round VII Report (December, 2015), there are an estimated 1.72 million people displaced as a consequence of the conflict in Adamawa, Borno, Gombe and Yobe. The largest proportion of IDPs are located in Borno state (1.43 million), followed by Adamawa (131,222), Yobe (131,203) and Gombe (24,934).

In an effort to develop a strategy on peace building and recovery as well as support coordinated and coherent assistance to conflict affected people in the North East1, a joint Recovery and Peace Building Assessment (RPBA) will be conducted by the Government of Nigeria, the United Nations, the European Union and the World Bank. The RPBA will cover the states of Adamawa, Bauchi, Borno, Gombe, Taraba and Yobe. Field missions to the states will begin in February.

For children displaced by the conflict, a return to some normalcy by regularly attending school is a critical need. In Fufore transit camp in Adamawa state, for example, there are an estimated 1,700 children without access to education; and in January, an field assessment of their education needs found that about 90 per cent of school age children had never attended school. At present, the transit camp accommodates about 3,000 returnees from Cameroon that will be later relocated to their area of origin (i.e. Borno state). However, plans for their relocation are uncertain.

In January, UNICEF partnered with the British Council’s Nigeria Stability and Reconciliation Programme to begin research on children associated with armed groups (both JAS and Civilian Joint Task Force/vigilante groups). The research will enable UNICEF and partners to design appropriate community-based reintegration and peacebuilding programs for children under 18 years of age.