Nigeria

Nigeria Humanitarian Situation Report - 1 December 2015

Format
Situation Report
Source
Posted
Originally published

Attachments

Highlights

• According to IOM’s DTM Round VI report (October, 2015), there are an estimated 1. 87 million IDPs as a result of the insurgency located in the three North East states of Borno, Yobe and Adamawa, including nearly 1.1 million children.

• In Maiduguri in Borno state, the Cholera Treatment Centre (CTC) was closed at the end of November, after the treatment and discharge of all remaining patients. There have been no reported new cases of cholera in IDP camps and surrounding communities as of the 1st December.

• A total of 1,678 UASC have so far been identified, of which 719 children (242 boys, 490 girls) are living with trained foster parents. An additional 151 community volunteers have been trained on psychosocial support, increasing the number of trained community volunteers delivering psychosocial support to children in the child friendly spaces to 625.

• On the 23rd November, 15 secondary schools were reopened. This marks a resumption of schooling at secondary level after more than a two-year suspension. Children from 19 additional schools located in high-risk areas are also attending the reopened schools.

• A total of 62,685 children under five with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) were admitted to therapeutic feeding programme between January and October in IDP camps and health facilities in host communities in Adamawa, Borno and Yobe states.

• Twenty ECHO funded boreholes drilled in partnership with RUWASA in 3 host communities in Jere LGA in Borno state, were installed with hand pumps and accessed by 12,607 IDP and host community members (3,376 men, 3,509 women, 3,021 boys and 3,607 girls)

• As of 30 November 2015, UNICEF has received around $14. 8 million USD against its 2015 HAC requirements of $ 26. 5 million USD (56% of total requirements); with a funding gap of 44% remaining.

Situation Overview & Humanitarian Needs

Since 2011, the population of the North East of Nigeria has been affected by the insurgency between Jama’atu Ahlis Sunna Lidda’awati wal-Jihad (JAS), commonly known as ‘Boko Haram’, and governmental forces. The government declared a State of Emergency (SoE) on 14 May 2013 in the three North Eastern states of Borno, Yobe, and Adamawa and imposed curfews. The Senate has not yet formally extended the State of Emergency from November 2014 onwards.

According to IOM’s DTM Round VI report (October, 2015), there are an estimated 1.87 million IDPs as a result of the insurgency located in the three North East states of Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states.
Programme accessibility to the 3 North East states remains a challenge due to the current unpredictable security environment. Large areas of Borno and Yobe state and to a lesser extent Adamawa state have been assessed as inaccessible to humanitarian activities as the military conduct large scale counter-insurgency operations. The nature of the conflict has changed from large coordinated attacks by insurgent elements on major urban centres to attacks by smaller groups against isolated settlements and areas with little security presence. Disparate insurgent groupings remain active in Borno, Yobe and northern Adamawa states, although officially the insurgents no longer control any Local Government Areas (LGAs).

In Maiduguri in Borno state, the Cholera Treatment Centre (CTC) was closed at the end of November, after the treatment and discharge of all remaining patients. There have been no reported new cases of cholera in IDP camps and surrounding communities as of the 1st December. Community sensitization and hygiene promotion as well as active surveillance continue and have been intensified to prevent further cholera outbreaks. There have been a total of 1,039 cases with 18 death since the first reported case on 7th September. The cumulative case fatality rate (CFR) has significantly reduce from 6.4% at the beginning of the outbreak to 1.7% as of 1st December.

As a result of efforts made by the Borno state High Powered Committee (HPC) and high level advocacy by UNICEF, the promise made by the Governor of Borno state during a visit by the Norwegian Ambassador to reopen secondary schools has been realized. On the 23rd November, 15 secondary schools were reopened. This marks a resumption of schooling at secondary level after more than a two-year suspension. Children from 19 additional schools located in high-risk areas are also attending the reopened schools. In some cases, 3-4 schools from the high risk areas have been merged with a single reopened school.

In follow-up to the new enrolments recorded in October, monitoring of attendance is ongoing in Borno and Yobe states. Challenges faced by schools in Borno state include the punctuality of teachers, the availability of learning spaces to accommodate children and prevent overcrowding as well as the availability of education supplies to support learning. In order to track out of school children (OOSC) in IDP camps and host communities, a profiling exercise has been undertaken in four LGAs (MMC, Jere, Konduga and Biu).

At Pompomari camp in Yobe state, attendance in class has waned for a number reasons, including the preparation of breakfast at home, the relocation of families out of camps, the loss of interest in education by parents and the preference of older children to engage in economic activity. In Damare School, which meets the education needs of IDP children located in NYSC camp in Adamawa state, attendance and punctuality have been affected by the late preparation of communal meals in the camp. There is a need to advocate for the regular and predictable preparation of camp meals to help prevent the disruption of school attendance.