Nigeria

Nigeria: Complex Crisis in the North East - Emergency Plan of Action Operation Update - One International Appeal (OIA) n° MDRNG022

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Situation Report
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Summary of major revisions made to emergency plan of action:

The operation: Complex Emergency in the North East Nigeria was designed to provide support to the Nigerian Red Cross Society (NRCS) in its response to the protracted humanitarian crisis in the North East of Nigeria where some 4 million people have been experiencing acute food insecurity and 1.9 million people been displaced by the conflict and in need of immediate humanitarian assistance.

This Emergency Plan of Action (EPoA) have so far been revised twice based on operational realities and needs. The first revision was informed by the assessments carried out in the target States of Adamawa and Yobe. It was important to take stock of implementation thus far and align it to the results of the assessments, considering appropriate human, financial and material capacity and needs. Whilst the original EPoA aimed at a response in three states, this first revision downsizes to two targeted states, namely Adamawa and Yobe, where the gap in humanitarian assistance was greater, and the increasing demand for emergency services for returnees have been increasing. The human resources (HR) requirements were also underestimated in the initial plan, hence this revision incorporated the appropriate HR needs to ensure adequate service delivery to the vulnerable communities.

The number of beneficiaries was also adjusted downwards to 300,000 people from the initial 360,000 people. A total of 140,000 affected people will be reached in Yobe and 160,000 in Adamawa, where five local government areas (LGA) are targeted in each state. The modification also requested and extension of the program from 10 to 12 months.

This Emergency Plan of Action (EPoA) was further revised from the December 2017 revision1 in order to accelerate the implementation of the plan, and, based on actual needs, is proposing an extension of operational timeframe by an additional two months from the planned end date of October 2018 to December 2018 so as to give time for finalization of activities. Sectoral and organizational development support will be pursued in 2019 through the IFRC country operational plan.

A. SITUATION ANALYSIS

Description of the disaster

The conflict in Nigeria’s north-east has resulted in widespread displacement, violations of international humanitarian and human rights law, protection risks and a deepening humanitarian crisis. Now in its ninth year, the crisis continues to uproot the lives of thousands of children, women and men and is adding to the long history of marginalization and chronic under-development. Since the start of the conflict in 2009, more than 20,000 people have been killed, thousands of women and girls abducted, and children drafted as so-called "suicide" bombers into the insurgency. Up to 2.1 million people fled their homes at the height of the conflict, 1.7 million of whom are still currently internally displaced and close to 200,000 people are still in Cameroon, Chad and Niger, after having been forced to flee.

In the three most affected states of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe, 7.7 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance, more than 50 per cent of whom are children. Government forces are recapturing territory from the insurgents, but the security situation in the north-east is expected to remain fragile. Over 80 per cent of Borno State is considered high or very high risk for international humanitarian actors, often constraining access to desperately vulnerable communities. As the security situation improves, new areas are becoming accessible and new dimensions of need and hope emerged. In the three most affected states of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe, 7.7 million people are in dire need of humanitarian assistance, more than 50 per cent of whom are children. Government forces are recapturing territory from the insurgents, but the security situation in the north-east is expected to remain fragile. Over 80 per cent of Borno State is considered high or very high risk for international humanitarian actors, often constraining access to desperately vulnerable communities. As the security situation improves, new areas are becoming accessible.