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West and Central Africa: Weekly Regional Humanitarian Snapshot (4 - 10 February 2020)

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CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

PERSISTING TENSIONS AND POPULATION MOVEMENTS

Following an outbreak of violence between armed elements from 25 to 26 January, an estimated 12,000 IDPs have been registered in the neighborhoods of Gobolo, Ndrou and Bria Hospital, in eastern Haute-Kotto prefecture. Inter-communal tensions remain high and fear stricken IDPs travel back home during the day and return to temporary IDP sites in the evening. According to findings from an interagency assessment mission carried out by UN agencies and NGOs, their priority needs include food, healthcare and WASH services. Humanitarian partners are mobilizing resources to respond to the humanitarian needs.

MALNUTRITION REMAINS HIGH

Malnutrition remains high across the country, according to the 2019 SMART survey. While the prevalence of acute malnutrition has decreased from 7.1 per cent to 5.8 per cent, chronic malnutrition has not improved over the past twenty years. UNICEF recommends a strengthened multisectoral approach integrating food security, improved access to healthcare, water and sanitation and cash-based interventions, to address chronic malnutrition. Further coordination between humanitarian and development actors in the nutrition sector is also required.

DR CONGO

POLIO VACCINATION TARGETS OVER 790,000 CHILDREN

On 5 February, a polio vaccination campaign targeting more than 615,000 children under five was launched in Kasai Central Province. More than 177,000 others are to be vaccinated in neighbouring Kasai Province. This immunization response follows the discovery of polio derived from a vaccine strain. DR Congo was declared polio-free a few years ago but cases of vaccine-derived infections continue to be detected.

NIGERIA

NEW DISPLACEMENTS IN BORNO

Escalating armed attacks, clashes between the military and armed groups, and poor living conditions due to lack of access to assistance forced more than 2,000 people to flee their homes between 27 January and 2 February, according to IOM’s latest Emergency Tracking Matrix. Most of the new displacements were recorded in Konduga, Askira-Uba, Gwoza and Dikwa LGAs in Borno. Limited resources, stretched capacities and access constraints hamper the delivery of aid. Regular attacks on civilians and humanitarian actors have contributed to an increasingly unstable environment. Previously accessible locations, such as Nganzai, Magumeri and Guzamala LGAs, are now cut off due to intensified attacks and clashes. It is currently impossible to reach an estimated 1.2 million people in need, depriving them of life-saving humanitarian assistance and services.

NIGER

FIVE KILLED IN ARMED RAID

On 6 February, armed individuals killed five civilians including a teacher in the villages of Molia and Sangara in the western Tillabéri region. The assailants also reportedly broke into the schools of Margamarga and Sangara, but the teachers fled for safety. This incident is the first of its kind, resulting in the death of a teacher in Tillabéri region. School attendance has suffered from attacks and threats by armed groups operating in the area since January 2016. As of 10 January, 111 schools remain closed due to insecurity in the region, according to UNICEF.

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit https://www.unocha.org/.