Nepal

UNICEF Nepal Humanitarian Situation Report No. 3 : Reporting Period: 1 July – 31 July 2021

Format
Situation Report
Source
Posted
Originally published

Attachments

Highlights

• Resurgence of COVID-19 cases was seen this month, as rolling average of daily cases increased by almost 46 percent from 1,604 on 1 July to 2,338 on 31 July, with an average positivity rate of 20 per cent.

• Additional 5.5 million doses of vaccines against COVID-19 arrived in Nepal accelerating vaccination drives. 9.7 per cent of the targeted population are fully vaccinated by end of July. UNICEF continued to provide technical, operational and logistics support to the vaccination efforts.

• UNICEF’s Child and Family Tracker (CFT) survey revealed that only 34 percent maintain social distance of two metres in public, 72 per cent wash hands with soap and water, and 69 per cent wear a mask outside the home. The low adherence to safety measures has further increased the risk of COVID-19 infection. The same survey underlined the concerns of 88 per cent of parents that their children were lagging behind in education.

• The monsoon floods and landslides continue to further exacerbate the hardship already caused by COVID-19. In 390 incidents reported so far, 64 people have lost their lives and 485 families have been displaced. Public properties like schools, roads, bridges, government offices and hydropower stations have been damaged severely, limiting access of relief to affected population.

• Despite the generous contribution from donors, more than halfway through the year, UNICEF Nepal still urgently needs an additional US$ 18,855,042 to ensure a response for families and children in Nepal during the current crisis.

Situation in Numbers

759,307 Confirmed COVID-19 positive cases in Nepal

64,751 Children under the age of 19 years tested COVID-19 positive

1,400,000 people in need of humanitarian assistance

568,000 Children in need

Funding Overview and Partnerships

Based on the UNICEF Nepal Humanitarian Action for Children (HAC) Appeal, UNICEF requires US$25.5 million to meet the needs of children, women and their families in Nepal affected by the COVID--19 pandemic and to respond to the monsoon flooding. To date, UNICEF has received US$6,629,961 including US$3,491405 in 2021. UNICEF is thankful for all the contributions made by donors for families and children in Nepal during the current crisis. Despite the generous contributions, UNICEF Nepal still faces a funding gap of 74 per cent and urgently needs an additional US$ 18,855,042 by July. Without the needed funding, at least 1.4 million people, including 568,000 children will not access the humanitarian support they need in Nepal.

Situation Overview & Humanitarian Needs

Over the month of July, a resurgence of COVID-19 cases was seen, as rolling average of daily cases reported have increased by almost 46 percent from 1,604 on 1 July to 2,338 on 31 July. The total caseload reached 759,307, of which 64,751 were below 19 years old. The positivity rate continues to remain high at around 20 per cent. The already weak health systems of Nepal are now beginning to get increasingly overwhelmed as COVID-19 patients requiring hospitalizations have increased. Following an earlier confirmation of the detection of the new mutation of delta variant known as delta plus variant (AY.1), Ministry of Health and Population (MoHP) issued a press release warning people to follow health protocols and of the threat of the possible third wave in the country. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared on 30 July that the new Delta variant is “dangerous and the most transmissible SARS-CoV-2 virus to date” . Additional 5.5 million vaccines against COVID-19 arrived in Nepal accelerating vaccination drives reaching 9.7 per cent of the targeted population by the end of July. On the other hand, the continuous inflow of vaccines has challenged the existing capacities for cold chain system management. Overcrowding in vaccination centres have been observed due to low management capacity in vaccination centres and high demand for vaccines.