Mozambique

United Nations Inter-Agency Appeal for Flood Relief in Mozambique (March - May 2001)

Format
Appeal
Source
Posted
Originally published


Prepared by the United Nations System in Mozambique in response to the Government International Appeal

Maputo, 8 March 2001

Table of Contents

Executive Summary
Background
Overall impact and response to date
Appeal objective and UN strategy

Sectors addressed in the appeal

  • Health
  • Water & Sanitation
  • Shelter
  • Food & Agriculture
  • Education
  • Logistics & Transportation
  • Co-ordination
  • Summary of requirements by sector

Management of programmes in the appeal

I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Government of Mozambique launched an International Appeal on 21 February for emergency assistance amounting to US$30 million.

The country entered 2001 under the threat of floods in Zambezia province because heavy rain in Zambia had forced the authorities to release water from the Kariba dam. The Zambezi River burst its banks on 3 January, flooding farmland in the north-western province of Tete, while the Cahora Bassa dam in Tete province stored enough water to prevent flooding further downstream. Later in January, a tropical storm brought heavy rain to Quelimane, capital of Zambezia, and other areas of the province. Further Heavy rain in neighbouring countries and high discharges from dams has led to (as of 26 February) 52 deaths, 81,394 people displaced and 406,565 people affected around the Zambezi river valley, within rain affected areas of Zambezia province and in other river valleys of the central provinces of Mozambique.

The United Nations agencies participating in this Appeal are OCHA, UNICEF, WFP, FAO, WHO and UNFPA, as well as UNDP. Assistance is sought for the displaced and affected population in Zambezia, Tete, Sofala and Manica provinces.

Actions are already under way to reduce vulnerability of affected and high-risk populations. In order to maintain and in some areas scale up the response in support of the Government of Mozambique Appeal, the United Nations Agencies (FAO, UNDP, UNFPA, UNICEF, WFP, OCHA and WHO) are appealing for further support in the areas of health, water and sanitation, education, shelter, logistics and co-ordination.

The total budget, broken down by sector for the UN Inter-Agency Appeal for Mozambique is as follows:

SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS BY SECTOR

Sector/Activity
Requirements (US$)
Health
2,437,751
Water & Sanitation
1,865,000
Shelter
200,000
Food & Agriculture
2,410,000
Education
514,000
Logistics & Transportation
2,633,000
Co-ordination
684,000
Total Requirements
10,743,751

Significant funding has already been forthcoming since the 21 February Government Appeal, which contains activities to be executed directly by the Government and/or NGOs. For this reason, the UN Appeal is considerably lower than the Government Appeal of US$30 million and focuses on areas where UN agencies have demonstrated skills and experience.

II. BACKGROUND

Disaster Proneness and Vulnerability

Mozambique lies on the Indian Ocean coast of South-eastern Africa. It has borders with Tanzania to the north, Malawi and Zambia to the north-west, Zimbabwe to the west and Swaziland and South Africa to the south and south-west. Measuring 799,390 sq. km. (308,565 sq. miles), Mozambique is characterised by a broad coastal plain and plateaux and highlands in the interior. The main rivers flow from west to east, emptying into the Indian Ocean. The population in 2000 numbered 17.2 million, giving a population density of 21.6 inhabitants per sq. km. Mozambique is vulnerable to flood, cyclones and severe tropical depressions. The fact that the country is the outlet to the sea for many of the regions rivers means the broad coastal plains are highly vulnerable flooding.

National Disaster Management System

The Co-ordinating Council for Disaster Management (CCGC) is the government body responsible for policy decisions relating to disasters. The Prime Minister chairs the CCGC and his deputy is the Minister of Foreign Affairs & Co-operation. The other four members are the ministers of Public Works & Housing, Transport & Communications, Health and Agriculture & Rural Development.

Day-to-day management of matters relating to disasters is the responsibility of the National Disaster Management Institute (INGC). This is an autonomous institution under the Ministry of Foreign Affairs & Co-operation. Currently INGC has delegates in each of Mozambique’s provinces, excluding Maputo City.

The Disaster Management Technical Council (CTGC) provides technical back-up to INGC. Its members represent the ministers on the Co-ordinating Council for Disaster Management, and it normally meets four times a year. The CTGC should co-ordinate sector and ministry warning systems on imminent disasters. It is also expected to define the national warning system, and propose the declaration of an emergency. The government’s National Policy on Disaster Management was approved in October 1999.

III. OVERALL IMPACT AND RESPONSE TO DATE

Impact of the disaster

Mozambique entered 2001 under the threat of floods in Zambezia province because heavy rain in Zambia had forced the authorities to release water from the Kariba dam. However, the Zambezi River burst its banks on 3 January, flooding farmland in the north-western province of Tete, while the Cahora Bassa dam in Tete province stored enough water to prevent flooding further downstream. Later in January, a tropical storm brought heavy rain to Quelimane, capital of Zambezia, and other areas of the province. By 26 January, 17,000 people were reported to be affected by floods in six districts, as well as the provincial capital.

Within the space of a week, the number of people directly affected in Zambezia province had risen to 23,600. The situation is under control, although continued heavy rain hampered the distribution of relief supplies and the assessment of needs.

Mozambique’s National Meteorological Institute reported heavy rain in the centre of the country in the week from 8 to 14 February. The heaviest rain fell on Tete province (305.7 mm in Tete city), followed by Manica (112.22 mm in Chimoio), Zambezia (85.4 mm in Quelimane) and Sofala (64.2 mm in Beira) provinces.

From the end of January, the level of the Zambezi river continued to rise because of local heavy rain in the Zambezi valley, as well as discharge from Kariba dam upstream between Zambia and Zimbabwe. By 13 February, the water was above flood level in several districts in the lower Zambezi valley, Caia and Marromeu in Sofala province and Chinde in Zambezia province, Mutarara district in Tete province and Tambara in Manica province.

The release of water from the Cahora Bassa dam on the Zambezi River was increased on 26 February. The river measured 6.91 metres at Tete city (flood level 7 metres) and 6.14 metres at Mutarara (flood level 6.9 metres). Nevertheless, the offices of the Mozambique Red Cross in Tete city were reported to be under water on 26 February. At Caia, the river measured 7.9 metres (flood level 5 metres). The Zambezi remained above flood level until 2 March.

The levels of other rivers in central Mozambique fluctuated in the period from January to 2 March. There was some localised flooding on the Pungoe, Buzi and Save Rivers, with reports of people displaced in Buzi and Nhamatanda districts of Sofala Province. The road west from Beira, Sofala Province, was closed along a stretch of about 10 km from 20 to 26 February because of flooding on the Pungoe River.

The INGC announced that as of 26 February, 52 deaths had been confirmed and 81,394 people had been displaced from their homes out of a total of 406,565 people affected by the floods.

UN agencies in support of the Government of Mozambique and other implementing partners have been conducting assessments within their sectoral areas. WFP staff on the ground have also been providing vital information about levels of vulnerability. All of which has been assisted by the development (pre-flood) of an inter-sectoral rapid assessment form and monitoring system.

According to FAO and the Ministry of Agriculture & Rural Development, by mid-February, over 33 thousand peasant farming families were affected and more than 22 thousand hectares of crops lost.

UNICEF staff have been working with provincial and district Government to identify threats and have completed implementation plans and are responding. Displacement increases vulnerability to immunisable disease. Moreover, many of the affected areas are now without access to safe drinking water and sanitation facilities, especially those under the influence of the Zambezi, Licungo, Pungoe, Buzi and Chire river basins. Extensive flooding has taken place and rural water and sanitation systems have been flooded or in many cases completely washed away. The poor state of sanitation and hygiene due to the floods has increased the number of cases of diarrhoea and also the risk of an outbreak of cholera. Over the next weeks to months those displaced will be returning to their homes, providing water and sanitation facilities is an immediate public health priority.

Preliminary estimates by UNICEF and the Ministry of Education indicate that the flooding in the provinces of Zambezia, Tete, Sofala and Manica has prevented over 50,000 primary school pupils from attending school, just as the school year was beginning. It is estimated that 183 schools in the four provinces have been forced to remain closed. Failure to ensure that these children have access to learning and schooling in a safe and healthy environment threatens their chances of completing their studies this year, and could lead to high rates of dropout.

National / Government Initiatives

In response to the disaster, the Government of Mozambique mobilised all resources and personnel to mitigate the suffering of the victims. It immediately set in motion the prevention and response mechanisms contained in its contingency plan, prepared in partnership with the United Nations, donors and NGOs.

With the rise in the level of the Zambezi River, the government despatched a group of navy personnel to Zumbo and Mutarara to conduct the rescue and evacuation of people at risk. In addition, technicians posted by the maritime administration were operating in Mopeia and Caia, assisted by a navy platoon and sailors trained locally.

Given the impact of the floods on road communications, the government boosted the efforts of the Mozambique armed forces, which were operating with one military helicopter, by chartering commercial aircraft to transport humanitarian assistance. The rescue operations managed to move 8,000 people from areas at risk by 21 February. Since the evacuations are still going on, the final figure is not yet available.

The INGC sent food, shelter materials and other basic survival items to the affected areas and are managing the co-ordinated response efforts.

On 21 February 2001, the Government of Mozambique issued an international appeal covering the requirement of emergency flood relief and rehabilitation. The appeal listed requirements for US$ 30 million for immediate relief and rehabilitation.

United Nations Initiatives

The United Nations Resident Co-ordinator is co-ordinating the UN system response to this disaster through the United Nations Disaster Management Team (UN-DMT), and is in close contact with the Government, to help co-ordinate assistance from the wider donor community. In addition, OCHA Geneva has funded an emergency co-ordination team to support UNRCO in Maputo and to co-ordinate assistance in Beira and Quelimane. A technical working group on food requirements has been established by WFP to arrive at a consolidated picture of food needs. Technical working groups have also been formed in the Ministries of Health, Education, Public Works and Housing. These groups are led by Government and UN agencies, donors and NGOs take part together.

The UN system (and most individual agencies) completed contingency planning last year and have been implementing preparedness actions for many months. For example WFP and UNICEF both propositioned food and non-food items in high risk areas and have been responding to the floods since their onset.

Other International Assistance

Some response has already been forthcoming to assist the survivors of the floods in central Mozambique. USAID and DFID (UK) have supported assessment, rescue and logistics in general through provision of air assets and boats and the South African Air Force has sent in a flying team to take part in rescue and supply missions, funded by the Netherlands. The UK’s Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) has drawn up a programme of assistance for Zambezia province of over US$ one million. In addition, the Mozambique Red Cross has received donations from the Red Cross Societies of Germany and China, as well as a donation from the Mozal Aluminium company in Maputo. On the ground DEC agencies, Food for the Hungry International, ACF, International and National Red Cross agencies and World Vision (among many) have been providing vital support to response implementation.

IV. APPEAL OBJECTIVE AND UN STRATEGY FOR RELIEF

Appeal Objective

The objective of the United Nations Inter-Agency Appeal is to raise funds for immediate emergency relief for people affected by floods in Mozambique.

Context

On 21 February the Government of Mozambique appealed to the international community for US$30 million to assist rescue and subsequent relief operations for three months for the survivors of the floods in central Mozambique. This United Nations Inter-Agency Appeal is intended to support the efforts of the Government of Mozambique to deal with the emergency situation caused by flooding on the Zambezi, Chire, Licungo, Buzi and Pungoe Rivers.

The UN Inter-Agency Appeal. The appeal concentrates on providing emergency relief to the most vulnerable, particularly those left homeless and destitute. It covers the needs for immediate emergency humanitarian relief and prevention of secondary problems (in health, water and sanitation, food, shelter).

(ii) A Joint Assessment of Continued Relief and Early Rehabilitation Needs. Before the end of the 3-month period, UN agencies, counterpart ministries and relevant NGOs will conduct a revision of continuing humanitarian relief needs. They will also carry out the assessment of the longer term rehabilitation requirements at community and national level.

V. SECTORS ADDRESSED BY THE APPEAL

1. HEALTH

Threat of outbreaks of immunisable diseases

Objective: To protect children and women from vaccine preventable diseases

Rationale

Displacement increases vulnerability to immunisable disease. To ensure full protection of 40,000 children and of women of reproductive age, immunisation campaigns will be implemented.

Partners: Ministry of Health and NGOs

Strategies:

  • Support measles vaccination campaign for children in flood affected areas
  • Support meningitis immunisation campaign for the general population in epidemic prone areas
  • Support to Vitamin A supplementation campaign

Main activities

1. Development of provincial workplans

2. Procurement and distribution of vaccines and consumables

3. Implementation of vaccination programme in flood affected areas

4. Follow-up and monitoring

Budget

UNICEF
WHO
Assessment, supervision and technical assistance
2,000
Development of provincial workplans
5,000
Procurement and distribution of vaccines and consumables
160,000
Implementation of vaccination programme in flood affected areas
40,000
Follow-up and monitoring
15,000
Transport and Freight
30,000
250,000
2,000

Threat of Diarrhoeal Diseases

Objective: To prevent and control the outbreak of diarrhoeal diseases

Rationale

Many of the affected areas are now without access to safe drinking water and sanitation facilities, especially those under the influence of the Zambezi, Licungo, Pungue, Buzi and Chire river basins. Extensive flooding has taken place and rural water and sanitation systems have been flooded or in many cases completely washed away. The poor state of sanitation and hygiene due to the floods has increased the number of cases of diarrhoea and also the risk of a cholera. Over the next weeks to months those displaced will be returning to their homes, providing water and sanitation facilities is an immediate public health priority. Areas of chronic flooding need stronger support to ensure greater preparedness and vulnerability reduction of communities.

Partners: Ministry of Health and NGOs

Strategies:

  • Support hygiene education and Oral Rehydration promotion
  • Support and strengthen Ministry of Health’s outbreak response, including training and establishment and pre-positioning of cholera treatment centres.

Main activities
  • Support hygiene education and Oral Rehydration promotion for cholera prevention and management, initially in the temporary accommodation centres and as people begin to move home or as close as possible to their area of residence, in the affected provincial capitals, smaller urban centres and rural areas
  • Strengthen epidemiological surveillance
  • Preposition equipment for cholera treatment centres, train personnel in clinical management and payment of CTC costs
  • Support the Ministry of Health through the provision of key health consumables and drugs (Ringers, ORT, catheters, nalidixic acid)

Budget
UNICEF
WHO
Assessment, supervision and technical assistance
2,000
IEC for prevention of diarrhoea diseases
30,000
Support hygiene education and Oral Rehydration promotion
50,000
Strengthen epidemiological surveillance
30,000
Prepositioning of equipment for cholera treatment centres
160,000
Training of personnel in clinical management
45,000
Payment of CTC costs
120,000
Provision of health supplies
150,000
Programme Support
75,000
Transport and freight
25,000
655,000
32,000

Threat of Malaria

Objective: To prevent increased malaria morbidity and mortality in children and women

Rationale

Malaria is a major cause of mortality in children under five in Mozambique. Flooding tends to create mosquito breeding sites and thus increases malaria transmission. Activities conducted during the emergency in 2000 contributed to the prevention of a major malaria outbreak. Activities in 2001 will ensure adequate treatment and prevention of malaria.

Partners: Ministry of Health and NGOs

Strategies

  • To reduce mortality and severe morbidity due to malaria by ensuring the availability of effective antimalarial drugs for affected communities
  • To protect inhabitants from increased risk of malaria transmission through implementation of a residual insecticide spraying programme and ITNs
  • To create capacity within communities to prevent malaria through appropriate use of ITNs, and to recognise signs and symptoms

Main activities:
  • Strengthen epidemiological surveillance
  • Procurement and distribution of ITNs
  • Malaria communication campaign
  • Support to improved case management (including modification of first line treatment if appropriate)
  • Support to indoor residual spraying activities

Budget
UNICEF
WHO
Assessment, supervision and technical assistance
2,000
Strengthen epidemiological surveillance
10,000
1,500
Procurement and distribution of ITNs
85,000
IEC prevention for malaria control
30,000
Malaria communication campaign
20,000
Support to improved case management (including modification of first line treatment - training, consumables)
140,000
Laboratory supplies
40,000
Support to indoor residual spraying activities
55,000
Transport and freight
10,000
360,000
33,500

Threat of Malnutrition

Objective: To prevent increased malnutrition and micro-nutrient deficiencies in children and women

Rationale

It is estimated that around 16,000 children under five years old are displaced and 80,000 affected. Damage to crops and loss of food stocks mean increased risk of malnutrition. Provision of supplementary feeding to children under-five years and lactating women and monitoring of nutritional status are priorities. Food support is being provided by WFP. UNICEF will support key prevention and care activities to reduce children’s vulnerability to malnutrition.

Partners: Ministry of Health, WFP and NGOs

Strategies

  • Support on-going surveillance of nutrition status
  • Support supplementary feeding activities for displaced/isolated children under-5, pregnant and lactating women
  • Support active detection and treatment of micro-nutrient deficiencies in existing health units
  • Support treatment of severe malnutrition
  • Vulnerability reduction and preparedness for future flooding/cyclones of high risk groups

Main activities:
  • Support to nutritional monitoring
  • Supplementary feeding activities for women and children including staff costs, distribution, monitoring
  • Therapeutic feeding activities, provision of therapeutic milk and equipment in collaboration with NGOs

Budget
UNICEF
WHO
Assessment, supervision and technical assistance
2,000
Nutrition surveillance
30,000
1,500
Support to nutritional monitoring for children under 5
55,000
Follow-up monitoring of supplementary feeding input for women and children (staff costs, distribution, monitoring)
40,000
Support Therapeutic Feeding for severely malnourished children
125,000
3,500

Threat to reduction in access to basic health care facilities

Objective: To avoid increased mortality and morbidity, especially among women and children.

Rationale

Heavy flooding has left over 80,000 people displaced - the majority is children and women. Isolated and displaced populations are vulnerable to disease and may lack access to key basic health services due to movement, isolation or flood damage.

Partners: Ministry of Health and NGOs

Strategies

  • Support continuity of access to basic health services in isolated areas and in accommodation centres
  • Support re-establishment of basic and referral health services, including reproductive health
  • Prevent psychological trauma, social and sexual violence
  • Vulnerability reduction and preparedness for future flooding/cyclones of high risk groups

Main activities:
  • Purchase and delivery of equipment and consumables
  • Support the increase in the number of health workers at district level
  • Conduct health promotion activities (including mental health)
  • Preparedness, planning and response institutional support to Ministry of Health

Budget
UNFPA
UNICEF
WHO
Assessment, supervision and technical assistance
2,000
Procurement of equipment and consumables
450,000
Procurement of emergency reproductive health kits
75,000
Training materials/prevention of STDs
50,000
Support to partners for additional staff costs
80,000
Field communication equipment to support health system
30,000
Institutional support to MISAU, DPS. DDS and NGOs
25,000
80,000
Transport and Freight
50,000
Operating and administrative costs
50,000
43,751
200,000
690,000
45,751

Threat of outbreak of bubonic plague

Objective: prevention and control of plague (Tete Province only)

Rationale

Mutarara District is affected by plague and flooding. Concentration of human and rodent populations increases the risk.

Partners: Ministry of Health

Strategies

  • Support and strengthen outbreak response, including surveillance, training of staff in clinical management and reinforcement of treatment.
  • Vulnerability reduction and preparedness for future flooding/cyclones of high risk groups

Main activities:
  • Purchase and distribution of equipment and consumables
  • Monitoring and surveillance
  • Training and additional staff costs of Ministry of Health

Budget
UNICEF
Procurement of equipment and consumables
25,000
Monitoring and surveillance
1,000
Training and additional staff costs
10,000
Transport and Freight
5,000
41,000

2. WATER AND SANITATION

Threat of Diarrhoeal Diseases

Objective: To prevent and control the outbreak of diarrhoeal diseases

Rationale

Many of the affected areas are now without access to safe drinking water and sanitation facilities, especially those under the influence of the Zambezi, Licungo, Pungue, Buzi and Chire river basins. Extensive flooding has taken place and rural water and sanitation systems have been flooded or in many cases completely washed away. The poor state of sanitation and hygiene due to the floods has increased the number of cases of diarrhoea and also the risk of a cholera. Over the next weeks to months those displaced will be returning to their homes, providing water and sanitation facilities is an immediate public health priority. Areas of chronic flooding need stronger support to ensure greater preparedness and vulnerability reduction of communities it is therefore important that

Partners: Ministry of Health, Ministry of Public Works and NGOs

Strategies:

  • Support hygiene education and Oral Rehydration promotion
  • Provide adequate sanitation facilities and solid waste control
  • Support the supply of sufficient potable water
  • Vulnerability reduction and preparedness for future flooding/cyclones of high risk groups

Main activities
  • Support rapid assessments of overall situation and identification of water and sanitation facilities damaged by flooding and areas for future intervention for preparedness measures.
  • Support hygiene education and Oral Rehydration promotion campaign focussing on personal hygiene and cholera prevention and management, initially in the temporary accommodation centres and as people begin to move home, in the affected provincial capitals, smaller urban centres and rural areas
  • Support the provision of supplies and equipment, including chlorine and chlorofloc sachets, to ensure safe water supplies in the temporary accommodation centres of the affected areas.
  • Construction of temporary sanitation facilities in the accommodation centres.
  • Strengthening of capacities in the Low Cost Sanitation Construction Projects (PLMs) to respond to the expected increased demands for reconstruction of destroyed sanitation facilities.
  • Support the clean-up of the social infrastructure, hospitals, schools, civic buildings, some roads and drains, and the appropriate disposal of solid waste in the affected provincial cities and rural areas.

Budget
UNICEF
Rapid assessments of water and sanitation systems
10,000
Support hygiene education and Oral Rehydration promotion campaign
50,000
Provision of emergency water supplies
1,000,000
Provision of sanitation facilities
200,000
Environmental clean-up operations
365,000
Programme Support
105,000
Transport and freight
135,000
1,865,000

3. SHELTER

Threat of inadequate Shelter

Objective: To reduce vulnerability to threat to survival and development that is aggravated by lack of adequate shelter

Rationale

In order to ensure key supplies are in country for children UNICEF will support purchase and delivery of basic shelter items to ensure key needs of children and women are met. -The bulk of these supplies are being managed through the Ministry of Public Works, UNDP within the UN system and implementation and supply procurement and delivery through the national and International Red Cross organisations. UNICEF has supported initial distribution of supplies and will deliver key additional supplies to ensure holistic support to vulnerable children and women. Further stocks will be needed as a contingency for future flooding as part of preparedness actions.

Partners: Ministry of Public Works and Housing, MRC, IFRC

Strategies

  • Support to Government and UN partners in designing adequate response to shelter needs in order to protect vulnerable children and women
  • Provision of key basic shelter materials to reduce immediate vulnerability
  • Vulnerability reduction and preparedness for future flooding/cyclones of high risk groups through provision of a contingency stock of shelter kits for rapid response in chronic flood areas.

Main Activities
  • Provide technical support to the existing shelter sector co-ordination mechanisms Government of Mozambique and UN
  • Assist in planning and response to the Shelter sector
  • Provide a small supply of basic shelter materials for immediate response actions
  • Assist the sector with logistical support
  • Technical support to Government and UN shelter cluster groups in effective preparedness planning for future flooding and provision of basic contingency supplies for protection of vulnerable children and women.

Budget
UNICEF
Provision of basic shelter materials
170,000
Transport/Freight
30,000
200,000

4. FOOD AND AGRICULTURE

Food requirements for a planned caseload of 155,000 people, covering the period from March to 31 December 2001 have been fully resourced.

Threat of hunger from crop losses

Objectives

  • Assure in the short-term that the affected farming families receive agricultural inputs to be able to plant during the second growing season of the 2000/2001 crop season. It would assure them a minimum food security until the next harvest.
  • Ensure in the medium-term that the beneficiary families will be able to produce some seeds for planting during the next season (2001/2002).

Rationale

Up to mid February 2001 more than 33 thousand farmer families were affected and more than 22 thousand hectares of crops were lost. Because heavy rain continues to fall both in Central Mozambique and neighbouring countries and river levels remain high, it is feared that up to mid March the number of affected families could increase and more areas be lost. A rough estimate indicates that more than 25 thousand new families can be affected in the central provinces. It is estimated that up to mid February 33 thousand kits of agricultural inputs including seeds and tools are needed. The cost per kit is US$ 30.00 and the distribution cost is US$ 9.00 per kit. Livestock losses and needs are being assessed and evaluated.

Partners: Ministry of Agriculture & Rural Development/FAO//WFP/NGOs

Planned activities

  • Continuous monitoring and assessment of the affected farmers and areas
  • Preparation of a general plan for assistance in the agricultural and livestock sectors
  • Coordination with donors for information sharing regarding intentions and type of interventions, as well as for funding purposes
  • Coordination with NGOs willing to participate in the input distribution process
  • Vulnerability reduction and preparedness for future flooding/cyclones of high risk groups

Budget
FAO
Seeds
950,000
Agricultaural tools
460,000
Vetinary Drugs
n.a
Coontingency seeds and tools
1,000,000
2,410,000

n.a. - Not available (assessment in process)

5. EDUCATION

Threat of not keeping children in school (Education)

Objective

To re-establish education services in the community, restore a sense of normalcy into children’s lives and promote the further development of basic education.

Rationale

Preliminary assessments have estimated that flooding has prevented 50,000 primary school pupils from attending school, just as the school year was beginning. Support will be needed to provide training to teachers and key educational materials (kits) to pupils and teachers, as well as materials for school cleaning/rehabilitation.

Partners: Ministry of Education

Strategies

  • Ensure rapid assessments with government partners to identify flooded locations, schools, numbers of teachers, and numbers of students affected.
  • Purchase and delivery of appropriate quantities of education materials in each location.
  • Support the transition from emergency back to normal schooling, while promoting the further development of education in the community
  • Ensure a safe and hygienic environment for schooling;
  • Vulnerability reduction and preparedness for future flooding/cyclones of high risk groups

Planned Activities
  • Provision of technical support for a rapid assessment of the numbers of children, teachers and schools affected and the status of schools’ readiness for re-opening as the water subsides.
  • Provision of learning and teaching materials to affected children and teachers: In order to get children back to school as soon as possible, learning materials for over 52,000 children, materials for over 183 schools and 1000 teachers will be purchased and distributed through the UNICEF/MINED distribution system;
  • Conduct teacher training programme in affected areas;
  • Provision of basic cleaning kits for 180 schools where necessary (buckets, mops, disinfectant, soap) and support to minor repairs;
  • Provision of temporary classrooms: If necessary, this includes the provision of tents to use as temporary schools/classrooms;
  • Preparedness planning activities with provincial and district counterparts and pre-positioning of key supplies prior to flood/cyclone season.

Budget
UNICEF
Learning materials
60,000
School Equipment
144,000
Supplies for cleaning
10,000
Tents for temporary schools
200,000
Rapid Assessment
20,000
Technical support & operational costs
40,000
Transport/freight
40,000
514,000

6. LOGISTICS AND TRANSPORTATION

Objective

Hiring of helicopters and fixed wing aircraft to ensure the search for and rescue of stranded flood victims and bring them to safer ground in numerous accommodations centres set up along the south bank of the Zambezi river; and delivery of food and non food items (i.e., medicine clothes, shelter, equipment)-rapid placement of health/sanitation supplies will help prevent an imminent cholera epidemic; and transport of humanitarian aid personnel to and from the flood affected areas.

Rationale

Much of the road network in the flood zones is impassable. Air support will therefore be required to ensure timely delivery of food and other essential relief supplies to the displaced and affected population.

Partners: INGC

Planned activities

  • An estimated 30 days of emergency relief air operations, working in full coordination with INGC.

Budget
WFP
Aircraft, crew, and navigation fee (30 days)
2,394,000
Operation and Support Costs (30 days)
189,000
2,583,000

Objective

Building shared communications networks.

Rationale

To provide access to communications networks on a shared basis by installing and maintaining the network to facilitate the provision of humanitarian assistance, and hire appropriately qualified personnel to keep it running until the operation is declared complete.

Budget

WFP
Field communications equipment
50,000
50,000

7. IN-COUNTRY COORDINATION

At the onset of the emergency, in agreement with the Government of Mozambique, the Office of the UN Resident Coordinator with support from the UN Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) facilitated the establishment and functioning of Co-ordination Centres based on recommendations from the UN Disaster Management Team (UNDMT). The Coordination Centre in Maputo is operational in the Office of the Resident Coordinator and consists of a national emergency coordination advisor, a communications officer, a data assessment, analysis, and mapping specialist and a public relations/media officer. Regional coordination offices in Beira and Quelimane have also been established with INGC. Logistics, food, water, health and shelter are coordinated through INGC working groups and UN flood sector clusters coordinated by UN agencies. Assessments of immediate needs are provided to a Joint Logistics Coordination Centre by 15:00 daily to plan transport assets for priority delivery of goods and services the following day.

Partners: All UN agencies, INGC, DEC, Red Cross, DFID, USAID, NGOs (UNDMT)

Coordination Objectives:

  • With INGC, promote the coordination of emergency activities of UN, NGO and bilateral partners
  • Create conditions for monitoring and evaluation in the field and mapping of relevant information for action
  • Assist in the dissemination of information and daily reporting of all relevant materials through situation reports and posting on common UN website
  • Enhance warning and alert systems with INAM (National Meteorology Institute)
  • Work with Government to ensure quickest response, coordinated activities, and lessened bureaucratic obstacles to facilitate immediate delivery of goods

The UN/INGC coordination of the overall flood assessment and response will be carried out through:
  • Data gathering, analysis, and mapping established through OCHA specialists with the INGC
  • Communications network nationwide with INGC, WFP, and UNDP to facilitate region-to-region radio communication for immediate problem solving and delivery of needed services for flood victims
  • Coordinated information sharing and reporting through a public relations/media centre with INGC and the daily maintenance of the UN common website floods page and the INGC website upgrading, and publication of UN and partners situation reports
  • Coordinated joint logistics centres for use of all transport assets
  • Regional coordinators to coordinate activities in logistics, communications, health, water, food, and shelter assessment and delivery of services coordination

The overall monitoring and co-ordination of the relief and rehabilitation work funded by this appeal will be the responsibility of the UN Resident Co-ordinator and OCHA, the UNDMT, the INGC, and of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

The UN Resident Co-ordinator, in collaboration with INGC and in-country UN agencies, will organise regular co-ordination meetings with UN agencies, donors, government ministries and NGOs, to exchange information on the progress of the relief and rehabilitation programme, assessment of immediate needs, and delivery of goods and services. Moreover, These coordination meetings will develop collective strategies to meet urgent humanitarian needs as they evolve. OCHA will assist in mobilising financial resources for the relief effort and tracking contributions, ensuring a full-scale dissemination of information through situation and monitoring reports.

Budget

OCHA
Communications coordination and equipment for national coverage
125,000
Vehicles and transport needs
55,000
Data gathering, assessment, mapping and processing
100,000*
Central and Regional coordination office support and equipment
105,000
Reporting and Documentation
65,000
Monitoring and supervision
234,000*
$684,000*
* Partially funded

8. Summary of Requirements by Sector

The total budget, broken down by sector for the UN Inter-Agency Appeal on behalf of Mozambique is as follows:

SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS BY SECTOR

Sector/Activity
Requirements (US$)
Health
2,437,751
Water & Sanitation
1,865,000
Shelter
200,000
Food & Agriculture
2,410,000
Education
514,000
Logistics & Transportation
2,633,000
Co-ordination
684,000
Total Requirements
10,743,751

9. Project Details

Donors are requested to contact the headquarters of the respective implementing UN Agency, for further details of the individual project inputs in each sector.

V. MANAGEMENT OF PROGRAMMES OUTLINED IN THE APPEAL

All components of the UN Inter-Agency Appeal will be implemented by in-country UN agencies, in co-ordination with their respective counterpart government ministries and/or partner NGOs. At the field level the appropriate UN agencies will be responsible not only for local procurement, but also monitoring and reporting on the progress of work, and the budget for each sector has included their operational support costs.

1. Channelling of cash contributions

In response to this appeal, donors can make their contributions directly to the United Nations agency which has been identified as responsible for implementation of programme inputs in the desired sector, or to the Government of Mozambique or to NGOs engaged in relief and rehabilitation in these sectors. OCHA is willing to serve as a channel for un-earmarked contributions that will be allocated in consultation with the UN Resident Co-ordinator and with relevant UN agencies to meet priority needs. Donors are requested to inform OCHA-Geneva of details of the contributions they make.

2. In-kind contributions

The requested relief items are available in the region, and cash contributions are therefore most suitable. There is a possibility that the huge demand for these items over the next few months may lead to temporary shortages. In this case appropriate contributions in-kind can also be considered and donors are requested to contact OCHA-Geneva or the responsible sectoral agency for guidance.

3. Reporting

For funds channelled through the United Nations system, appropriate UN agencies will be responsible for monitoring, co-ordinating and reporting on the efforts to their donors. A summary report on the progress of work will also be prepared as a co-ordinated effort by the UNDMT under the guidance of the United Nations Resident Co-ordinator.

OCHA will track contributions and ensure general reporting, both through continuing situation reports and specific reports to donors on the implementation of the appeal, as appropriate. The entire inter-agency emergency relief and initial rehabilitation will be formally reviewed at the end of the period.

4. Contact details

For further details, please contact: OCHA Geneva

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit https://www.unocha.org/.