Mozambique

Special Appeal by the Govt. of Mozambique to deal with floods in the centre of the country

Format
Appeal
Source
Posted
Originally published

Attachments


Government of Mozambique - United Nations

Table of Contents

Executive Summary
Background
Justification of the Appeal

  • Weather
  • River Basins
  • Social and economic impact

Action undertaken
  • Before the floods
  • The onset of the crisis
  • Evaluation of the response

The components of this appeal
  • Food aid
  • Logistics
  • Fuel & Energy
  • Roads & Bridges
  • Shelter & Accommodation
  • Agriculture
  • Health
  • Education
  • Water & Sanitation
  • Women & Social Welfare
  • Coordination

Final considerations
Financial summary

Annex 1: Distribution of rescue boats
Annex 2: Zambezia Contingency Plan (2000/2001)
Annex 3: Mozambique & UN Contingency Planning Groups

Executive Summary

The forecast made by the Southern African Climate Outlook Forum (SARCOF) last September of normal to above-normal rainfall in the centre of Mozambique during the 2000/2001 rainy season has proved correct. The country has been facing an emergency situation since 23 January, initially in Zambezia Province and then in northern parts of Sofala Province, resulting from the passage of a tropical storm.

The situation then spread to Tete and Manica provinces, because of heavy rainfall in the country, discharge from dams on the Zambezi River and increased flows on its tributaries. Thus districts in four provinces have been affected in the Zambezi Valley.

As a result of the combined effects of the rain and the floods, some 77,000 people have been displaced and about 389,000 in the four provinces are affected. Moreover, by 19 February the number of confirmed deaths stood at 41.

Many roads in the centre of the country have become impassable, wells in rural and peri-urban areas have been flooded and the sanitary conditions in urban centres have deteriorated.

Immediately following the SARCOF forecast, the government began working on the preparation of a contingency plan, in partnership with the United Nations, donors and NGOs. From October to December 2000 public awareness campaigns were conducted in areas at risk and the National Institute for Disaster Management (INGC) and the World Food Programme (WFP) positioned stocks of food and relief goods, including boats, in strategic locations.

Besides heavy rains inside Mozambique itself, neighbouring Malawi and Zambia have also experienced torrential rain, producing enormous volumes of water that increased the flows in the Zambezi, Pungoe, Revubue and Ligonha Rivers. While it is not expected that floods this year will reach the scale of 2000, nevertheless conditions must be prepared in the affected districts to avoid this emergency from becoming a catastrophe.

Floods increase the risk of outbreaks of disease, such as cholera, and of higher incidence of malaria. The health authorities estimate that US$ 5.9 million will be needed to replenish stocks of essential drugs, to provide basic health services in the accommodation centres, and to support epidemiological surveillance and preventive response.

Moreover, torrential rain and floods have damaged roads and bridges, which must be repaired to allow access to isolated communities. Some US$ 6.4 million is required for road and bridge repair.

Furthermore, displaced people need to be sheltered and fed while they are in accommodation centres. The cost of supplying blankets, plastic sheeting, kitchen kits and other essential relief items is estimated at US$3.6 million.

With regard to fuel needs, the cost of this is estimated at US$3.0 million, to cover requirements for rescue and relief operations and for electricity generation in areas isolated by the floods. This sum includes generators of varying power that will be needed to ensure electricity supplies to hospitals, accommodation centres, water pumping stations and communications centres.

Clean water supplies and good sanitary and hygiene conditions are also vital to ensure that displaced people remain healthy. The requirements for the provision of safe water and sanitation and the promotion of good hygiene amount to US$2,400,000.

The economic and social effects of this excessive rainfall have likewise been huge. Preliminary estimates from the Ministry of Agriculture & Rural Development indicate that about 33,300 peasant farming families have been affected, with the loss of 22,400 hectares of crops, mainly maize, rice and cassava.

The cost of providing seeds and tools so that farmers can plant a second crop is estimated at US$2.3 million. The Ministry of Agriculture & Rural Development is already in contact with donors and part of these funds have already been allocated.

The funds required to enable the INGC to coordinate emergency operations, monitor and evaluate the situation on the ground, produce and disseminate information on the development of the situation and coordinate alert and warning systems with the National Meteorological Institute (INAM) and the Ministry of Public Works & Housing, as well ensuring flexible mechanisms to allow people and goods to enter the country in the context of humanitarian assistance, amount to US$700,000. However, the estimate could rise if conditions deteriorate sharply.

Because of the upheaval of the emergency, the government is seeking US$200,000 for social programmes among the displaced population in the accommodation centres.

The statement of needs in the Mozambique government appeal does not include food. This is because the WFP had pre-positioned food stocks in strategic locations and is still working with carry-over supplies from 2000. In fact, the requirements expressed in the appeal are in addition to assistance provided and pre-positioned by the other United Nations agencies and are part of implementing the UN Contingency planning process finalised in December 2000.

The United Nations agencies are now working on the preparation of a Consolidated Inter-agency appeal in support of the relief efforts to assist the survivors of the floods.

Financial Summary

Sector / Activity
Requirements
Logistics
5,500,000
Fuel & Energy
3,000,000
Roads & Bridges
6,400,000
Shelter & Accommodation
3,600,000
Agriculture
2,300,000
Health & Education
5,900,000
Water & Sanitation
2,400,000
Women & Social Welfare
200,000
Coordination
700,000
Total
30,000,000

I. Background

The basis of this appeal document is the activities foreseen, carried out or already under way in the context of the Contingency Plan prepared and approved by the Government in December 2000. The plan is based on two scenarios, one extreme one contemplating the simultaneous occurrence of floods and cyclones and the other moderate, with the occurrence of floods alone. All of this was based on the long-range weather forecasts produced in Gaberone by SARCOF (Southern African Regional Climate Outlook Forum) specialists and other experts.

The SARCOF forecast of last September of above-normal rainfall in the centre of Mozambique during the 2000/2001 rainy season has proved correct. The forecast was reconfirmed by SARCOF in December, and with this in mind the Government began a broad and decentralised process to prepare a contingency plan, which was completed and approved in December. The plan was immediately put into operation, involving government institutions, community leaders and authorities, the United Nations, NGOs and donors at every stage.

The effects of these floods, foreseen in September, can now be observed. Their direct impact has been deaths, people displaced and affected, food crops submerged, homes destroyed and access roads cut. Thus the Government took the decision to put into action the mechanisms for response contained in the contingency plan. It has also prepared this appeal on the basis of risk indicators, specifically meteorological, hydrological and socio-economic indicators, which are presented below.

The various agencies of the United Nations are now working on the preparation of a Consolidated Inter-agency appeal to support the efforts of the Government and strengthen relief assistance to the survivors of the floods.

II. Justification of the appeal

a) Weather conditions

Higher than normal rainfall has been recorded in the central region in the current rainy season (2000/2001), confirming the earlier forecasts. At the Quelimane meteorological station, the accumulated rainfall measures 924.1 mm, compared to the normal average of 509.7 mm (and 90.5 mm in 1999) - see tables 1 and 2. Of the 924.1 mm at Quelimane, 271.2 mm fell in the period from 22 to 29 January, showing why this torrential rain had such a severe impact on the population, on the flow of rivers in the central region, as well as on the roads. The rain in Zambezia Province fell initially from 23 to 25 January as a result of a tropical storm.

Table 1: Accumulated rainfall from the 1st decade of October 2000 to the 3rd decade of January 2001, showing deviation from the normal average
Zone
Station
AR'00/’01
NOR AR
Deviation
Mean deviation
(mm)
(mm)
(mm)
South Maputo observatory
399.5
396.3
3.2
58.6
Maputo Mavalane
455.4
396.3
59.1
Changalane
421.7
396.6
16.4
Xai-Xai
680.1
391.3
288.8
Inhambane
280.7
360.5
-79.8
Vilanculos
430.1
366.2
63.9
Beira
918.6
679.1
239.5
Centre Chimoio
569.2
569
0.2
160.1
Tete
356.6
370.2
-13.6
Quelimane
924.1
509.7
414.4
North Nampula
660.2
625.8
34.4
157.1
Pemba
356.1
333.6
22.5
Montepuez
440.2
Lichinga
Source: INAM
Table 2: Accumulated rainfall from the first decade of October 2000 to the third decade of January 2001, showing deviation from the period 1999-2000
Zone
Station
AR'00
AR'99
Deviation
Mean deviation
(mm)
(mm)
(mm)
South Maputo observatory
399.5
107.8
291.7
378.9
Maputo Mavalane
455.4
135.1
320.3
Changalane
421.7
27.1
385.6
Xai-Xai
680.1
74.7
605.4
Inhambane
280.7
39.4
241.3
Vilanculos
430.1
0.9
429.2
Centre Beira
918.6
7.7
910.9
563.8
Chimoio
569.2
7.5
561.7
Tete
356.6
60.6
296
Quelimane
924.1
90.5
833.6
North Nampula
660.2
143.9
516.3
418.2
Pemba
356.1
36
320.1
Montepuez
69.6
Lichinga
67.6
Source: INAM

b) The river basins

Heavy rains in Mozambique and in neighbouring countries have caused the levels of rivers in the centre of the country to rise since January. In particular, the flows in the Licungo (Zambezia), Zambezi and Pungoe (Sofala) Rivers and their tributaries have gradually risen and reached flood level at measuring stations, such as Caia, inundating low-lying areas, most notably in Maganja da Costa (Zambezia) and Nhamatanda

The flow of the Zambezi River has risen above flood level in Zumbo, Magoe and Mutarara districts (Tete Province), Tambara district (Manica Province), Caia and Marromeu districts (Sofala Province) and Mopeia, Morrumbala and Chinde districts (Zambezia province). The river levels on 21 February 2001 are shown below in metres.

River levels on 21 February 2001

Location
Current level
Flood level
Zumbo
6.45
6.00
Tete city
6.27
7.00
Mutarara
6.53
6.90
Caia
7.89
5.00
Marromeu
7.35
6.00

These river levels could rise even further, given that the reservoir behind the Cahora Bassa dam reached 324.88 metres on 20 February, when the flood level is 326 metres. Moreover, water is flowing into the dam at the rate of 11,938 cubic metres per second, compared to a discharge rate of 4,197.4 cubic metres per second.

c) Social and economic impact

The direct effects of the floods and rains on social and economic activities are 41 deaths, some 77,000 people displaced from their homes and about 389,000 people affected in the four provinces of Zambezia, Tete, Manica and Sofala. An estimated 30,000 hectares of food crops are inundated and many roads have become impassable, isolating a number of districts and administrative posts.

About 33,300 peasant farming families have lost their of food crops, mainly maize, beans, rice and cassava. This could lead to malnutrition in the short term because of lost food reserves.

III. Action undertaken

a) Before the floods

The Government immediately set in motion the prevention and response mechanisms contained in the contingency plan, in partnership with civil society, the United Nations, donors and NGOs. Putting the contingency plan into operation took account of the participatory and decentralised nature of its preparation, from district, through province to ministry, with the involvement of community leaders and authorities.

The main focus of the Contingency Plan in the period before the start of the rains is to:

  • Identify populations and areas at risk in each district;
  • Identify safe places for accommodation and evacuation routes to them;
  • Make an inventory of existing resources and their location;
  • Pre-positioning of a minimum of resources for evacuation and relief in places at risk;
  • Prepare mechanisms to advise and warn the population of the possible occurrence of a disaster;
  • Determine what additional resources are needed for response.

The various state and other organisations involved then harmonised their strategies on the basis of the inventories of existing resources at each level, in the light of the possible scenarios. These foresaw the provision of assistance overall to some 2,720,000 people, or 16% of the total population in the provinces at risk from floods and cyclones.

The Contingency Plan approved in December and distributed among donors foresaw needs amounting to US$62,000,000.

The requirements for intervention were aimed at ensuring actions towards preparation, readiness and response, should the extreme or moderate scenarios of the Contingency Plan happen.

The Government secured financial resources that permitted constant monitoring of the unfolding flood situation from the very start, with support from the Mozambique Armed Forces. Teams from the Technical and Coordinating Councils for Disaster Management went into the field to check on the levels of readiness in the districts and administrative posts.

The United Nations, for its part, began its preparation through the Resident Coordinator’s Office by activating the Disaster Management Team that is composed of all agencies represented in Mozambique. Eight activity clusters were formed to make an appropriate assessment of the situation and prepare a contingency plan accordingly, in collaboration with the Government. The UN agencies pre-positioned food and non-food items in areas foreseen to be at risk in order to be able to meet the immediate needs of people who might be affected.

To put the Contingency Plan into operation, the Government took a series of measures.

  • 28 December: approval of a plan for cabinet members to be on stand-by during the flood alert period.
  • 29 December: Ministry of Defence and INGC fine tune operational aspects of the Contingency Plan, strengthening the Ministry’s representation on the Technical Council.
  • 29 December: inventory of pre-positioned stocks updated.
  • 4 January: more warnings broadcast on radio and television and in the newspapers.
  • 9 January: Zambezia Technical Council monitors floods on the Chire River at Megaza.
  • 9 January: Tete provincial government creates a solidarity committee with representatives of civil society and NGOs.
  • 11 January: the Technical Council for Disaster Management and the provincial governments of Sofala and Tete fly over the Zambezi valley and conclude that the situation is not yet one of alarm.
  • 11 January: sailors contracted in Tete to work in Zumbo and Tete.
  • 12 January: The Technical Council participates in a regional seminar in Pretoria on readiness and response to possible floods on the Limpopo.
  • 16 January: three more motorised boats placed in Mutarara.
  • 17 January: INGC, USAID and WFP make reconnaissance flight over Zambezi valley.
  • 20 January: INGC positions fuel in Mutarara.
  • 24 January: The Technical Council makes another reconnaissance flight over the Zambezi valley.
  • 28 & 29 January: joint assessment by the Government, USAID, UK & UN of the impact of floods in Zambezia province.
  • 31 January: local flood response group formed in Inhambane province.
  • 2 February: INGC resumes weekly meetings with cooperating partners and NGOs
  • 4 February: INGC begins weekly press briefings.
  • 6 February: Council of Ministers discusses the flood situation and the Zambezia provincial government’s appeal for assistance.
  • 8 February: members of the Council of Ministers make reconnaissance flight over the Zambezi valley.

b) The onset of the crisis

With the rise in the level of the Zambezi River, the government despatched a group of navy personnel to Zumbo and Mutarara to conduct the rescue and evacuation of people at risk. In addition, technicians posted by the maritime administration were operating in Mopeia and Caia, assisted by a navy platoon and sailors trained locally.

Given the impact of the floods on road communications, the government boosted the efforts of the Mozambique armed forces to alleviate the suffering of the population by chartering commercial aircraft to transport humanitarian assistance.

In addition, USAID and DFID (UK) funded a helicopter and a Cessna Caravan for operations by WFP.

The combined efforts of the Government, the United Nations and and NGOs managed to maintain the pace of humanitarian assistance and to evacuate 8,000 people from areas at risk to safer areas, thus reducing the loss of life.

c) Evaluation of the response

The Government considers the response opportune and effective. Moreover, the coordination mechanisms put in place have proved functional in that flood warnings have been heeded, although there has been some localised resistance, resulting in loss of life.

Bearing in mind that some 77,000 people have been forced to flee their homes and live displaced and 389,000 remain in the areas isolated by flood water or blocked roads, the Government prepared this emergency appeal. Moreover, the weather and river conditions could deteriorate further and the Cahora Bassa dam, now almost full to capacity, could be forced to open its sluice gates. Thus the Government would like to mobilise extra support from civil society and the international community for humanitarian activities to assist the survivors of the floods. The final objective of the appeal is to mitigate such outcomes as epidemics, malnutrition and other diseases prevalent in the rainy season.

The meteorological, hydrological and socio-economic indicators have reached such levels that the capacity of the Government is now not sufficient to deal with this crisis unaided.

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At the same time, judging by the degree of vulnerability of the population in the affected areas, and considering that we are technically still within the rainy season

more rain or cyclones could yet occur, according to the forecast from INAM (National Meteorological Institute).

The weather conditions that caused floods in the provinces of Zambezia. Tete, Sofala and Manica are moving southwards and endangering people in the Buzi, Pungoe and Save River valleys. Thus the Government of Mozambique wants to maintain an acceptable level of response to the current emergency situation.

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The purpose of this emergency appeal is to:

  • Maintain and accelerate humanitarian missions, particularly to isolated areas;
  • Mitigate the possible impact of the current situation, especially in relation to outbreaks of disease and the depletion of food stocks;
  • Maintain continuous monitoring of the situation in order to take appropriate action.

The Government wants this appeal to mobilise support for humanitarian assistance for the period from February to May 2001, as detailed in the following sections.

IV. The components of this appeal

1. Food aid

Current information from the World Food Programme indicates that immediate food needs are guaranteed. However, this situation could change according to the numbers of people affected by the floods and the crop areas destroyed during the remainder of the rainy season. The WFP Emergency Operation No. 6225/02, approved in September 2000, is still under-funded by 24% or US$1.4 million. This is equal to approximately 4,000 tonnes of food (maize, beans and oil).

Moreover, pregnant and lactating women, as well as children under five years of age, will be specifically targeted for complementary feeding programmes.

2. Logistics

In line with the Contingency Plan, food supplies, as well as shelter materials were distributed in advance to areas at risk from flooding. In addition, boats donated in the context of last year's floods in the south of the country have been distributed among the various operators in emergency activities.

To strengthen this capacity in the short term, some donors, such as USAID, UK, and UN agencies (the WFP and UNICEF) are funding air assets to distribute humanitarian assistance and conduct aerial assessments of the provinces with emergency conditions.

Considering the problems with access to the affected zones and in the light of past experience, the Government, through the INGC as well as other operators, is coordinating the use of the available air assets in order to maximise their utility.

Existing assets

Type
Operator
location
Helicopter MI 8 :FADM
INGC
Beira
Cessna Caravan
INGC
Beira
Cessna Caravan
INGC
Zambezia
Puma (DFID)
UN
Zambezia
Puma
UN
Beira

Given that the rainy season is not over until after the end of March, this will delay the rehabilitation of access roads for some time. It is thus assumed that 30 days of flying time will be required.

Moreover, work in these first 30 days will focus on transporting relief goods to the population in need, so that further freight capacity will have to be chartered, specifically ships and trucks to transport drugs, water treatment chemicals and other goods from Maputo, Beira and Quelimane to Macuse and Chinde, both isolated, as well as to other relief distribution points.

However, as soon as road traffic is possible, relief goods to assist the population in need for a period of three-months will be dispatched.

Various different groups are carrying out relief and rescue operations, including the Mozambican armed forces, notably the navy and the air force, as well as the police, the fire brigade and the maritime administration. The Mozambique Flying Club is also prepared to participate. Funds are required to ensure that these activities continue and increase, as the crisis deepens. Under the present conditions, air operations are the most effective, but should be replaced by surface transport as soon as the situation allows.

Logistics requirements

Type
Operator
Period
Cost (US$)
Helicopter MI8:FADM
INGC
30 days Beira
20,000
C 130
INGC
3 days
95,000
Puma Helicopter
INGC
15 days Beira
241,000
Puma Helicopter
INGC
15 days Beira
241,000
Puma Helicopter
INGC
15 days Beira, Caia
241,000
Puma Helicopter.
INGC
15 d Beira/Marromeu
241,000
Puma Helicopter
INGC
15 days Beira,Caia
241,000
Puma Helicopter
INGC
15daysTete,Zumbo
241,000
Cessna Caravan/ Bell Helicopter
INGC
15days /Beira, Caia
180,000
Cessna Caravan/ Bell Helicopter
INGC
15 days Quelimane
180,000
Sub Total*
1,921,000
Puma (DFID)
UN
15 days + 7days
462,000
Puma (USAID)
UN
15 days
321,300
Puma
UN
15 day + mobilisation & demobilisation
351,300
Buffalo
UN
7 days + mobilisation & demobilisation
151,160
Sub Total
1,285,760
Sub-total
3,206,760
Other transport
800,000
Total for Response and Rescue
1,500,000
Total
5,500,000
*The INGC costs shown in the table do not include fuel, while the UN costs do.

3. Fuels & Energy

The estimated fuels necessary for rescue operations, distribution of relief goods, evaluation and monitoring and the production of electricity in areas isolated by the floods are shown in the following table. These requirements include generators, that will be used to guarantee power supplies to hospitals, accommodation centres, water pumping stations and communications centres.

It should be noted that the fuel requirements shown in the table below do not include fuel for UN operated aircraft, the cost of which is included in the logistics table above.

Fuel & Energy requirements

Quantity
Unit Cost
Total Cost
m3
US$/m3
US$
Diesel
1,400
560
786,600
Petrol
980
580
568,400
Jet fuel
3,000
400
1.200,000
Paraffin
250
400
100,000
Generators
15
23,000
345,000
Total
3,000,000

4. Roads & Bridges

Much of the road network in the affected provinces is impassable because of flooding and damage to bridges. The economic costs to the country are enormous because goods and people are prevented from travelling.

Where possible, roads and bridges should be repaired in order to restore traffic. In cases where repair would involve costly solutions, alternative routes will need to be opened.

Road and Bridge repair needs

Province
Repair cost (US$)
Sofala
1,500,000
Tete
1,400,000
Zambezia
2,800,000
Manica
700,000
Total
6,400,000

5. Shelter & Accommodation

Shelter and cooking sets must be provided to people made homeless by the floods and torrential rain. Moreover, some basic planning is required for accommodation centres, as well as the installation of rudimentary shelter infrastructure.

Needs for Shelter & Accommodation

Province
Cost (US$)
Sofala
194,000
Manica
94,000
Tete
576,000
Zambézia
2,736,000
Total
3,600,000

6. Agriculture

The 2000/2001 farming season was delayed by about one month, since the first rain fell only in the third week of October. However by the end of February, the Ministry of Agriculture & Rural Development estimated that 33,300 peasant farming families had lost at least some of their crops. The crop area lost is estimated at 22,400 hectares, planted mainly with maize, beans, rice and cassava (see map 3).

In Tete Province, 7,300 with 3,400 hectares of crops were affected in the districts of Zumbo, Mutarara, Magoe and Changara.

In Sofala Province, 6,700 families with 4,300 hectares of crops were affected in the districts of Caia, Chemba, Dondo and Machanga, and on the outskirts of the city of Beira. Many of the families affected had their homes on islands in the Zambezi River.

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In Zambezia Province, 17,300 families with 13,200 hectares of crops were affected in the districts of Morrumbala, Mopeia, Chinde, Nicoadala, Namacurra, Maganja da Costa and Pebane.

In Tambara district, Manica Province, 2,000 families lost 1,500 hectares of crops.

The inputs necessary to assist the affected families restore their livelihood is based on a kit composed of seeds and tools. The cost of each kit is US$30, to which US$9 must be added for distribution costs. Thus, the requirements to cover the number of families who have lost crops amounts to US$ 1,300,000. However, given the continuing deterioration of the situation and the probable rise in river levels, a further 25,700 families are at risk. Another US$1,000,000 is needed to meet these requirements, making a total of US$ 2,300,000 required for emergency needs in agriculture.

Affected population, flooded crop areas and needs by province

Province
Affected families
Crop area lost (ha)
Budget (US$)
Tete
7,300
3,400
285,000
Sofala
6,700
4,300
262,000
Zambezia
17,300
13,200
675,000
Manica
2,000
1,500
78,000
Sub-Total
33,300
22,400
1,300,000
Contingency
25,700
1,000,000
Total
59,000
2,300,000

7. Health

Floods bring the risk of outbreaks of disease, such as diarrhoeal diseases (including cholera), measles, bubonic plague and malaria. By the week ending 17 February, Maputo city and province and Gaza and Manica Provinces had recorded cases of cholera. The number of cases in Maputo rose by 30% in that week.

Incidence of Cholera since January 2001

Province
Cases
Deaths
Case fatality rate
Maputo city
914
9
1%
Maputo province
77
1
1%
Gaza
24
0%
Manica
75
2
2%

The remaining provinces occasionally register cases of acute diarrhoea, on average two to four a week, that could be cholera.

This situation could deteriorate rapidly, given that flood conditions tend to contaminate water supplies and ruin sanitation systems.

Health requirements

Activity
Cost (US$)
Assessment, Supervision and Assistance at central, provincial and district level for malaria, cholera and malnutrition prevention, immunisation and maintenance of basic health services
150,000
Drugs/vaccines medical and other materials
3,980,000
Surgical materials
400,000
Laboratory reagents for malaria and cholera
50,000
Malaria control (mosquito nets, spraying)
350,000
Material for prevention of diarrhoea and malaria (incl. training materials and operating costs)
300,000
Staff training (malaria and cholera treatment and therapeutic feeding)
100,000
Operating costs for the above activities (incl. local transport and staff)
475,000
Epidemiological/nutritional surveillance
45,000
Distribution monitoring, complementary feeding
50,000
Total
5,900,000

8. Education

Preliminary estimates indicate that the flooding in the provinces of Zambezia, Tete, Sofala and Manica has prevented over 50,000 primary school pupils from attending school, just as the school year was beginning. Failure to ensure that these children have access to learning and schooling in a safe and healthy environment threatens their chances of completing their studies this year, and could lead to high rates of dropout.

Schools affected, by province

Province
Primary Schools
No. of Pupils
No. of Teachers
Zambezia
140
45,500
946
Tete
16
2,500
42
Sofala
19
3,050
51
Manica
8
1,300
22
Total
183
52,350
1,061

In order not lose the gains in education, particularly enrolments, over the past few years, UNICEF will provide support to the Ministry of Education to restore learning in schools to the levels that prevailed prior to the flood emergency.

The objective of this assistance is twofold: to restore basic education for children directly affected by the floods; and to ensure a safe, clean environment for schooling.

The first step in this assistance will be to provide technical support for a rapid assessment of the overall situation in affected provinces. The second step is to provide learning and teaching materials and cleaning materials. Tents for temporary classrooms may also be provided if necessary The following table shows the breakdown and budget for requirements in education.

Requirements in education

Description
No. kits
Unit Cost (US$)
Total Cost (US$)
Learning materials
52,350
1.70
88,995
School Equipment
183
1,165.55
213,296
Supplies for cleaning
915
14.67
13,423
Tents for temporary schools
20
15,000
300,000
Rapid Assessment
30,000
Transport/freight/logistics
60,000
Tech. support & operational costs
55,000
Total
760,714

9. Water & Sanitation

With regard to the supply of clean water and the provision of adequate sanitation facilities to the displaced and affected population, it will be necessary to provide technical assistance for the coordination of assistance in accommodation centres. Furthermore, plastic water tanks will be needed, as well as motorised water tankers and generators to power small water systems. New wells with hand pumps will be required, together with chemicals to treat drinking water. Latrines are needed in the accommodation centres and public awareness campaigns on hygiene and sanitation will help to protect the health of the displaced people. In the end, public places in flooded towns and villages will require clean up activities.

Water & Sanitation requirements

Item
Cost (US$)
Technical assistance
83,600
Emergency water supplies
1,695,500
Sanitation / clean-up
562,900
Hygiene promotion, education and training
58,000
Total
2,400,000

10. Women & Social welfare

Lessons drawn from the floods of 2000 show everyone involved in humanitarian assistance that this should not be limited to the provision of relief goods to the affected population. A holistic approach should be taken so as to cover physical and social issues, both at institutional and community levels. The purpose of this approach is to mitigate the psycho-social impact of the event.

The Government and its cooperating partners consider it pertinent to ensure that activities are carried out in the context of women and social welfare, given the role of women within the life of communities.

Requirements for Women & Social Welfare

Activity
Cost (US$)
Family reunification (children & elderly)
10,000
Psycho-social & material assistance
50,000
Day centres (children & elderly)
20,000
Public awareness for solidarity
20,000
Public awareness of flood risks
20,000
Monitoring & Evaluation
10,000
Capacity building in provincial Government
70,000
Total
200,000

11. Coordination

The main aspects in this sector are:

  • To guarantee technical coordination of emergency operations as a whole;
  • To create conditions for monitoring and evaluation in the field, as well as ensuring a steady flow of information on the emergency situation, in collaboration with the relevant institutions;
  • To establish in coordination with INAM (National Meteorology Institute) and the Ministry of Public Works & Housing warning and alert mechanisms;
  • To ensure the establishment of flexible mechanisms to allow the entry of people and goods into the country in the context of humanitarian assistance;
  • To guarantee readiness and response.

Requirements for Coordination
Activity
Cost (US$)
Material resources
175,000
Public awareness
120,000
Vehicles
100,000
Data gathering and processing
70,000
Equipment
100,000
Current materials
10,000
Translation & printing
10,000
Motorcycles
28,000
Monitoring & Supervision
53,000
Sub-Total
666,000
Contingency(5%)
33.300
Total
700.000

VII. Final Considerations

As happened in the preparation phase of creating a minimum of capacity for readiness, the Government now deems it wise to call once more on the various sections of civil society, NGOs, donors and United Nations Agencies to provide every assistance in implementing this appeal by means of already established mechanisms at various levels.

The Government, through the Coordinating Council for Disaster Management, will maintain a permanent link to evaluate the level of response and of later fine tuning, by means of the mechanisms set out in the Contingency Plan for the current rainy season.

Financial Summary

Sector / Activity
Requirements
Logistics
5,500,000
Fuel & Energy
3,000,000
Roads & Bridges
6,400,000
Shelter & Accommodation
3,600,000
Agriculture
2,300,000
Health & Education
5,900,000
Water & Sanitation
2,400,000
Women & Social Welfare
200,000
Coordination
700,000
Total
30,000,000

(zip file)

Instituto Nacional de Gestão de Calamidades
Rua de Resistência, 1746/8a
Tel: (258 1) 416007/8
Fax: (258 1 ) 417576
www.ingc.teledata.mz
United Nations Resident Coordinator’s Office
Av. Kenneth Kaunda, 931
Tel.: (258 1) 499674
Fax:: (258 1) 499674
www.unsystemmoz.org

Bank Account:

Banco Comercial de Moçambique
A/C No. 202 55551501 (US$)
Av 25 de Setembro, 1800
Maputo